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Author Topic: Wow what a Asian Feast this weekend.  (Read 7563 times)
KD8MJR
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Posts: 2523




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« on: September 09, 2013, 12:03:30 PM »

With band conditions this bad I would have predicted a total bust but instead I got

Numerous JA contacts
numerous middle east countries
3 From China (all deaf but loud)
Mongolia (Wow he was 58 at 9pm EST on 20M)
Micronesia
Philippines

Thank you AA contest  Smiley


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NU1O
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Posts: 2691




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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2013, 12:10:49 PM »

The All Asian has always been a favorite of mine and there were plenty of stations from all over Asia in the contest. 

The Chinese stations have to put up with all sorts of QRN so it's not the fault of the operators but the conditions they must operate in.  Growth is the number one priority in China and that comes at the expense of USA-like regulations against equipment which generates RFI.
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WH7DX
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2013, 12:11:31 PM »

Yes, there were a bunch of nice ones in there.  Looks like the Mongolia Ham (don't have call sign with me) decided to spend some time on the air!  

You can see how big China will become with Ham Radio if the government allows it.  

I was happy with Somalia working the contest yesterday.  Didn't seem to care wether the QSO counted or not.   QSL card in the mail - going to EU.

Good fun.

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W1NK
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Posts: 437


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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2013, 01:52:18 PM »

I was amazed at the offering of the AA contest (I haven't paid it much mind in the past) and really wanted to snag a few Qs for Marathon points and mults.  JT5DX coming thru S5-S6 on 20 on Saturday afternoon was a surprise, but as usual, time constraints and family obligations kept my butt everywhere but in the chair!

Frank, W1NK
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2013, 01:55:44 PM »

While I spent most of my weekend outdoors I did get a few mins to spin the VFO around. I heard China calling CQ. I tried calling him a few times but he wasn't hearing any replies. I fired up the amp but just as I put it in-line he qsy'd. That was the extent of my contest work... if I had the time I would have loved to go for some band fills. Oh well.. next year..
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N2NL
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Posts: 338




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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2013, 02:49:28 PM »

My noise floor is three S-units (18 dB) louder when pointing northwest (China region) than any other direction from here on Guam.  This is all white noise - garbage - generated by cheap Chinese electronics.  I can't imagine how bad the noise floor actually is while operating in the more populated areas of China.

73, Dave KH2/N2NL
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WD4ELG
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2013, 05:32:09 PM »

Worked XWOYJY for ATNO #313, on 2 bands! Couldn't believe it.  Had a blast.  Need to put a calendar for next year.
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NU1O
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2013, 08:57:39 AM »

Worked XWOYJY for ATNO #313, on 2 bands! Couldn't believe it.  Had a blast.  Need to put a calendar for next year.

Nice catch! I worked him on 15 meters.

Have you noticed how much younger the hams from the developing world are compared to the US and Japan?  Over the next few decades I think most new hams will come from China, Brazil, and Indonesia.  Most people know China has more than a billion citizens but Brazil has about 200 million and Indonesia's population is about 1/4 billion.

I worked the CVA contest a few weeks ago and the number of Brazilian hams was very impressive.

When 15M closed during the All Asian I moved to 20M and the Brazilians were as strong as many of the Asian stations I was working and they were coming in off the back of the beam.

I got a new shipment of QSLs last week from the buro.  The two major differences from when I started in the hobby 25 years ago was the quality of the cards (almost all looked to be done by a commercial printer), and the number of Brazilian QSLs I received in the shipment. The Brazilian cards outnumbered all European countries except Germany and Italy.
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W6GX
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Posts: 2785




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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2013, 11:02:43 AM »

Over the next few decades I think most new hams will come from China, Brazil, and Indonesia.

With all due respect I don't think we'll see an explosive growth in ham radio activities in China.  I recently visited China and what I observed go against your prediction.  There are two main reasons, one is a physical limitation and the other is culture.  On the physical limitation most of Chinese who are wealthy enough to buy a ham radio live in the city.  Within the city the price of land is so high and the density is so high that ham radio antennas are reserved for clubs, schools, and contest stations.  While I was in China I didn't see a single ham radio antenna.  Secondly, regarding culture, here in the U.S. we like to spend money on our hobbies.  Wealthy retirees move to the countryside and erect massive antenna farms.  Conspicuous consumption is not the norm here.  In China conspicuous consumption is the norm because social status is a big deal in a country where majority of the population lives on $5 a day.  Wealthy Chinese retirees (who has the time for ham radio) live in high rise condos and drive an Audi A8L.  You think they will put a screwdriver/bug catcher antenna on their Audi Cheesy  The countryside is reserved for the farmers and the poor.  I think India, Brazil, and Indonesia would likely follow the trends in China.  I understand that there are serious hams in any country.  However take a look at the dxpedition stats. on Clublog and see how many contacts are from S.A. and Africa.  Then take the number of contacts and divide it by the population.  Do the same math on the U.S. and compare the data.  Population and increasing wealth alone don't make a good case for ham radio popularity.  Just my $0.02.

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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N3QE
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Posts: 2288




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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2013, 11:31:16 AM »

In China conspicuous consumption is the norm because social status is a big deal in a country where majority of the population lives on $5 a day.

I got to visit many places in China last summer. It was a great trip! Horrible RFI in the major cities, and not easy to hear much other than buzzes and hash in the countryside either. Smog everywhere except for Kunming. Even the mountainous small towns in western china, were afflicted by smog from nearby cities/industries.

On conspicuous consumption - yes, all the big cities had major shopping districts constructed around luxury EU/US brands and sports car dealerships. Yes, there has been a huge change in the past couple decades as country kids move to the city, and the standard of prosperity has changed from radio+bike to sports car+big screen TV. Yes the consumerism is flashy in a surprising way... sorta reminds me of what young men and women buy in formerly communist eastern block countries in EU. But I hardly feel that represents the core Chinese culture or values.

I have been using qrz.com to track my China QSO's and trace down the addresses, at least in Beijing. I had become moderately familiar with large swaths of Beijing and some of the suburbs. In the city, there are club stations with beams (in some cases stacks of beams!) on school roofs. There are also a few with a beam on a balcony (this tends to be a common theme for Shanghai area stations). Further out, there are suburban/country type homes owned by the wealthy where they have an antenna up.

I certainly don't think that ham radio shops will pop up in Beijing next to the downtown sports car dealerships. I hope and am confident it will take a more sustainable path, probably through clubs.

Tim.
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NU1O
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Posts: 2691




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« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2013, 11:50:58 AM »

With all due respect I don't think we'll see an explosive growth in ham radio activities in China.  I recently visited China and what I observed go against your prediction.  There are two main reasons, one is a physical limitation and the other is culture.  On the physical limitation most of Chinese who are wealthy enough to buy a ham radio live in the city.  Within the city the price of land is so high and the density is so high that ham radio antennas are reserved for clubs, schools, and contest stations.  While I was in China I didn't see a single ham radio antenna.  Secondly, regarding culture, here in the U.S. we like to spend money on our hobbies.  Wealthy retirees move to the countryside and erect massive antenna farms.  Conspicuous consumption is not the norm here.  In China conspicuous consumption is the norm because social status is a big deal in a country where majority of the population lives on $5 a day.  Wealthy Chinese retirees (who has the time for ham radio) live in high rise condos and drive an Audi A8L.  You think they will put a screwdriver/bug catcher antenna on their Audi Cheesy  The countryside is reserved for the farmers and the poor.  I think India, Brazil, and Indonesia would likely follow the trends in China.  I understand that there are serious hams in any country.  However take a look at the dxpedition stats. on Clublog and see how many contacts are from S.A. and Africa.  Then take the number of contacts and divide it by the population.  Do the same math on the U.S. and compare the data.  Population and increasing wealth alone don't make a good case for ham radio popularity.  Just my $0.02.

73,
Jonathan W6GX

Jon,

You wrote a very interesting post.  I have not been to China (my back couldn't tolerate the long flight) but my youngest brother has been there and although he knows nothing about ham radio he did predict the collapse of the Soviet Union when he visited the country as a high school senior. That was when the CIA's position on the USSR was there wasn't going to be any change in the foreseeable future.

I know many of the hams in China operate from clubs but why couldn't there be a sizable increase in clubs?  I recall when there was one club station in all of China and I believe there are now at a minimum 20,000 licensed amateurs in China so their growth rate has been tremendous.

A ham needs two things: spare time and disposable income.  Assuming you are correct about China why would India, Brazil, and Indonesia follow China and not Western Europe, Japan, and the USA.  BTW, Japan has the same problem as China with regard to very high property prices and limited space but there is not a shortage of hams so I guess we will have to wait a few decades and see what actually happens in China. Those in the city could erect stations in the countryside and operate them remotely, or they could buy second homes in the rural areas to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life.  I've worked many Japanese hams who live in the city and set up a station on ancestral property in the rural areas.

I disagree that conspicuous consumption is not normal in the US.  You should visit my town and take a look at the luxury cars and the new McMansions which have dramatically increased during the past two decades. You should also visit Manhattan, The Hamptons, Cape Cod, or take a trip to Florida's Gold Coast.  I've only been to Vegas so my firsthand experience on the Left Coast is nonexistent. I don't think there is much difference between China and the US when it comes to showing off one's wealth but you have the big advantage of having been to China.

It will be fascinating to see how this plays out over the coming decades, and once again you wrote a very thought provoking post!
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WH7DX
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2013, 12:09:13 PM »

Yes, China, Brazil, Indonesia..  all growing in Ham Volume.   The sheer size of the population.   The young have much more interesting in Ham than in America.   I was surprised at the age as well.   I'm going to pull up some data later today on age groups.   I stopped at 100 QSOs but there was a clear pattern.

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W6GX
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Posts: 2785




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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2013, 12:12:35 PM »

Hi Chris,

Thanks for the reply.  Prior to my visit to China I have read and watched as much as I could about this up and coming country.  However actually being there it gives one a new perspective that is unmatched by other means.  To sum up my experiences on ham radio in China, ham radio is just not a priority for the majority of the Chinese, yet.  Most of the middle class is trying to save up for their first car.  I'm not old enough to experience this but the Americans at one point were saving up for their first TV or washing machine.  I doubt ham radio/antenna towers were a priority then.  I do hope one day ham radio will take off in developing countries.

Regarding your comments on Japanese hams.  Yes I could never figure out how the JAs managed to put up beams despite the limited space.  Every QRZ page I visited on a JA ham I see big antennas and nice QTHs.  It seems there are endless number of well-equipped JA stations Cheesy

73,
Jonathan W6GX
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NU1O
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Posts: 2691




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« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2013, 12:15:39 PM »

Yes, China, Brazil, Indonesia..  all growing in Ham Volume.   The sheer size of the population.   The young have much more interesting in Ham than in America.   I was surprised at the age as well.   I'm going to pull up some data later today on age groups.   I stopped at 100 QSOs but there was a clear pattern.



I was going to do some averaging for Japan and the other Asian countries but haven't got around to it yet.  The youngest ham I worked was from Thailand and he was all of 25.  Most of the Japanese I worked were in their 60's or 70's.  The hams in the other Asian countries were in their 30's and 40's. Quite a difference.

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WH7DX
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Posts: 1029




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« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2013, 12:18:59 PM »

Yes, China, Brazil, Indonesia..  all growing in Ham Volume.   The sheer size of the population.   The young have much more interesting in Ham than in America.   I was surprised at the age as well.   I'm going to pull up some data later today on age groups.   I stopped at 100 QSOs but there was a clear pattern.



I was going to do some averaging for Japan and the other Asian countries but haven't got around to it yet.  The youngest ham I worked was from Thailand and he was all of 25.  Most of the Japanese I worked were in their 60's or 70's.  The hams in the other Asian countries were in their 30's and 40's. Quite a difference.



Yep - that's what I saw - same pattern.   I worked the same 25 year old.   I remember feeling old at times or young.
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