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Author Topic: Would you tell someone they have a bad fist?  (Read 50623 times)
KH2BR
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Posts: 103




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« on: September 22, 2013, 06:22:52 PM »

Some fists are really really bad but it could be due to a disability. They could be using there foot
But I would be ashamed to ask. So would you dare tell the other op that there fist sucks really bad?
What kind of excuse would you use to bail out of a bad fist qso?
Would you hang in there and help him  get his fist working better.
What's the right thing to do?
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WX2S
Member

Posts: 735




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« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2013, 06:32:34 PM »

What purpose would it serve? It'd be like telling someone that their baby was ugly.

I find it a bit frustrating to work hams who can't go very fast, but I do it to build their speed.

-WX2S.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2013, 06:35:48 PM by WX2S » Logged

73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
K7KBN
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Posts: 2805




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« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2013, 07:18:58 PM »

WX2S - I think he meant that the speed was okay but the fist was just bad: poor spacing, misadjusted bug, etc.

I have used QSD many times.  Might as well be I who tells the station about the problem- if everybody was "nice" about it, how would he ever know?
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K8AXW
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Posts: 3860




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« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2013, 08:36:34 PM »

2S has a point.  This problem falls into the same category as telling someone they have bad breath.....B.O......etc.

If you really get frustrated you might send him a QLF  (Now try sending with your LEFT food!)

Actually the answer is basically the same as dealing with bad breath..... don't answer them, or if his fist turns to crap sometimes after the QSO starts, drop him. 

After he checks his antenna, power output and SWR for the 50th time, he might think, maybe it's my sending.  Uh-huh....

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GW3OQK
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Posts: 148




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« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2013, 01:27:04 AM »

I use QSD to indicate a faulty transmission such a slow switching where the beginning of the transmission is lost. I have heard people calling FQ FQ. Ocasionally I use it when they can not control their keyer and keep sending extra dots and can not even send their call sign correctly. If its a someone using a straight key trying his best I'd persevere and try to make my own morse perfect and error free so he/she knows what it should be. What would you say to LX1NJ who insists on sending the "1" with an extra dash as dit dah dah dah dah dah dah?
Andrew
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1716




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« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2013, 02:21:34 AM »

    No, since I operate qrp I simply use the typical canned QRT excuses or try to bow out gracefully with the all to frequent QSB/QRM excuse. Not that my own fist is that great either.
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K9AIM
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Posts: 1047




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« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2013, 02:29:19 AM »

i have yet to tell anyone, but will probably do so before too long.  The one thing that bugs me the most though is when i hear an op sending dahs BARELY longer than their dits...   maybe i am wrong, but it seems to be a modern problem as i don't remember hearing that issue three decades ago but now i hear it more than i should. 

i guess one could look their email up via qrz.com and send them this video with its beautiful keying and tell them they really 'need' to check this out  Tongue ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOqbjbzC9V8
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AC4RD
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Posts: 1235




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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2013, 04:13:06 AM »

... I use it when they can not control their keyer and keep sending extra dots and can not even send their call sign correctly.

Oh, you HAVE worked me, then.  :-)   I've got a problem with muscle tremor, the last few years.  It makes it hard for me to send by hand unless I slow WAY down.  I can work CW just fine as long as my memory buttons on the keyer are working--they cover a lot of standard exchanges for DX and contesting.  But if you ask me "UR COUNTY?" and I don't have that in one of my memory buttons, instead of "WAKE" you're likely to get "W A DAH DITDITDIT SRI " and another try.

It's embarrassing, but I'd rather not give up CW because of this, not yet, at least.
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WX2S
Member

Posts: 735




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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2013, 07:27:50 AM »

KBN: My point was that the polite thing to do is to just work through the frustration, whatever it's source. Take a look at my QRZ.com page if you want to see what I'm talking about. 30 years QRT didn't do my fist any favors. I'm slowly getting it back, but I still make a lot of mistakes. And I'm very aware of when I muff it.

73, wx2s.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 07:33:56 AM by WX2S » Logged

73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




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« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2013, 07:56:28 AM »

I've got a problem with muscle tremor, the last few years.  It makes it hard for me to send by hand unless I slow WAY down.

It's embarrassing, but I'd rather not give up CW because of this, not yet, at least.

I'm almost in the same boat.  My tremors come and go.  It helps when I send around 10 or 11 wpm.  Last night I was using my iambic key and 3 different times I couldn't make a dah while calling CQ and sent a string of dits when trying to send the 'A' in my call sign.  I just shut off the radio for the night.  Yeah, it's embarrassing when I mess up CQ or even my call sign but I really like CW.  I have another rig that will do SSB and I have a matching microphone for it.  I'd rather leave them on the shelf though.

As for the OP statement, I've run into people that seem to only send dahs but you can pretty much tell from their timing what they are trying to say.  Personally, I wouldn't dream of saying anything to them on the air.  If I had a friend in a face-to-face QSO I would probably tactfully mention some ways of improving such as using cwget  on a computer to copy code from his code practice oscillator speaker.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 08:01:52 AM by KA0HVE » Logged
K8AXW
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Posts: 3860




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« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2013, 08:18:08 AM »

Perhaps I'm wrong.....callous....whatever you wish to call it..... but I think if you have a handicap, rather it's tremors or whatever, it's time to set aside the key. 

This is no different than poor eyesight requiring one to give up the car keys or put away the pistol. 

There is usually an alternative with CW though fellow keybangers.  That's a keyboard keyer.  While physical problems might limit the use of our hands, our minds quite often can continue to copy and enjoy using Morse code. 

As for a keyboard keyer, a person can continue using CW with just one finger.  The "I can't find the keys fast enough" excuse is just that.  It might take a short learning period but it's really easy. A lot shorter than learning to use a key.

I've built three keyboard keyers and they're an incredible device.  Instead of banging a key, which in some cases is synonymous with banging one's head against a wall, try a keyboard keyer. 

Put some fun back into your hobby both for yourself and those who you want to work.

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KC8Y
Member

Posts: 245




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« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2013, 09:10:33 AM »

I am handicapped and totally agree with all the comments.

Have a rare form of MS: late-onset muscle atrophy/advancing deteriation of all muscles in body.

Going to try to perform CW (first-keyer, second-keyboard) but i can only do about 12WPM, after being  25-years away from it!

K8AXW-since your in WV (not too far from me), kinda interested in your keyboard keyerss.  E-mail me at kc8y@arr.net

.


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KC8Y
Member

Posts: 245




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« Reply #12 on: September 23, 2013, 09:16:13 AM »

MY typing error Sad

e-mail---- kc8y@arrl.net
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NI0C
Member

Posts: 2406




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« Reply #13 on: September 23, 2013, 09:24:49 AM »

My experience is that most people with bad fists know it all too well, and are grateful to make QSO's with people who can copy them.  I am not talking about those who try to send way faster than they can reliably control their keyers. 
73,
Chuck  NI0C
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KA0HVE
Member

Posts: 117




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« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2013, 09:37:14 AM »

There is usually an alternative with CW though fellow keybangers.  That's a keyboard keyer.  While physical problems might limit the use of our hands, our minds quite often can continue to copy and enjoy using Morse code.

As for a keyboard keyer, a person can continue using CW with just one finger.  The "I can't find the keys fast enough" excuse is just that.  It might take a short learning period but it's really easy. A lot shorter than learning to use a key.

Put some fun back into your hobby both for yourself and those who you want to work.

A keyboard keyer is definitely next on my list.

I can type all day long and I've always been good at it.  Tremors cause me to double strike a key now and then but I assume I can edit my message before I hit the key (enter?) to send the message.  I know the day is coming when I have to give up the regular keys and go to a keyboard and that day may be here a lot sooner than I had hoped.
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