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Author Topic: Mississippi River SSB  (Read 20249 times)
W8JJI
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Posts: 291




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« on: October 13, 2013, 02:11:35 PM »

I've been away from the hobby for a few years and was wondering if there is still any SSB radio traffic that can be heard from the barges and tugs that travel the mississippi river and gulf region ?

I used to listen to them on the 6 mhz marine channels during the daytime , it's been a few weeks and   I haven't heard anything.

Are they still on the air ?

Thanks
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N4NYY
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2013, 04:06:00 PM »

Marine freq were moved up to 2M. Off course, unless you have some stragglers around. The problem with the Mississippi is it is not in international waters, so FCC rules are in effects.
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 342




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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2013, 11:13:46 AM »

Marine freq were moved up to 2M. Off course, unless you have some stragglers around. The problem with the Mississippi is it is not in international waters, so FCC rules are in effects.

2 meters? Then some of the Chinese non-Part 90 compliant HTs sold on Ebay should receive those freqs. I think the dual band Baofengs cover 136-174 Mhz.
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AC4RD
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2013, 04:57:36 PM »

I used to listen a lot to river traffic on 156mHz, and also to marine SSB frequencies.  This was 25-30 years ago, not long after my own summer as the "World's Worst Deckhand, Lower Missippi Division."  :-)   I rarely heard the towboats on the sideband frequencies even back then; probably VERY little of it left these days.  The last time I was in my home town (just east of Baton Rouge Reach), I could hear plenty of VHF FM towboat traffic.  I didn't even try the HF SSB frequencies, that trip, though.

I used to enjoy listening to the boat captains chatting in low voices on the marine VHF frequencies, late in the night, keeping each other company during the night watches.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2013, 04:53:49 PM »

Marine freq were moved up to 2M. Off course, unless you have some stragglers around. The problem with the Mississippi is it is not in international waters, so FCC rules are in effects.

2 meters? Then some of the Chinese non-Part 90 compliant HTs sold on Ebay should receive those freqs. I think the dual band Baofengs cover 136-174 Mhz.

Marine band is 156.0 and 162.025 MHz, so it appears you are correct. I do not think you need a license for that band, right?
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W9GB
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2013, 07:05:22 AM »

Quote from: N4NYY
Marine band is 156.0 and 162.025 MHz, so it appears you are correct.
I do not think you need a license for that band, right?

FCC Wireless Services: Ship Radio Services: Licensing
http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=licensing&id=ship_stations

Who Needs a Ship Station License?
You do not need a license to operate a marine VHF radio, radar, or EPIRBs aboard voluntary ships operating domestically. The term "voluntary ships" refers to ships that are not required by law to carry a radio.
Generally, this term applies to recreation or pleasure craft.
Ships that use MF/HF single side-band radio, satellite communications,
or telegraphy MUST continue to be licensed by the FCC.


The term "voluntary ships" does not apply to the following:

1.) Cargo ships over 300 gross tons navigating in the open sea;
2.) Ships certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry more than 6 passengers
for hire in the open sea or tidewaters of the U.S.;
3.) Power driven ships over 20 meters in length on navigable waterways;
4.) Ships of more than 100 gross tons certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry
at least one passenger on navigable waterways;
5.) Tow boats of more than 7.8 meters in length on navigable waterways; and,
6.) Uninspected commercial fishing industry vessels required to carry a VHF radio.
7.) Ships required to carry an Automatic Identification System (AIS) transceiver by the U.S. Coast Guard regulations enacted pursuant to the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2000.

Ships are considered as operating domestically when they do not travel to foreign ports or do not transmit radio communications to foreign stations. Sailing in international waters is permitted, so long as the previous conditions are met. If you travel to a foreign port (e.g., Canada, Mexico, Bahamas, British Virgin Islands), a license is required. Additionally, if you travel to a foreign port, you are required to have an operator permit.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 07:11:31 AM by W9GB » Logged
KD9VV
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Posts: 26




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« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2013, 02:19:16 PM »

Ya..They are still there but not what it once was.

In the 6 and even 8 Mhz region I still hear deck hands mostly speaking in spanish late night. Most of the commercial and interesting traffic has moved to satellite where most of the hands on board are not allowed access to.
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KB1LHE
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« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2013, 09:16:10 AM »

   During the mid 80s I used to hear a lot of river traffic on 4.125 MHz USB but listening recently, I have not heard anything. I even checked up and down a bit in case band use changes occured since. Where did they go on HF?
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2295




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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2013, 03:49:52 AM »

Where did they go on HF?  They went to VHF and Satellite, and no doubt cellular for business traffic.

*Go directly to the top of the page, re-read the thread.  Smiley
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1619




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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2013, 07:02:45 AM »

Mostly all marine VHF working channels for ( River conditions, pilot changes, meeting, passing situations etc. info.) with exception of ch.16/13 which is for emergency/ distress and calling. Cell phone as noted by QAA for Company business. SSB mostly as backup to satellite for offshore fishing/commercial shipping fleets.
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