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Author Topic: Franklin Converter Company??  (Read 7717 times)
WB4IUY
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« on: December 04, 2013, 07:45:22 PM »

Anyone know what this is, or have a link to info on it? I've been searching, but having no luck. It looks like it is some sort of ham radio audio interface build into an old serial port A/B switch housing. I think it was a kit, because they had custom stickers to overlay on the front panel that say 'Franklin Converter Company', 'Bypass', 'Interface', and such. The rear panel has extra ports for audio in, audio out, and transmitter key.

Dave WB4IUY
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N3QE
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2013, 03:30:37 AM »

"Franklin Converter" is mostly associated with WEFAX and SSTV interfaces. It's possible I suppose they could also do RTTY but mostly they were for those slow video modes.
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WB4IUY
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2013, 05:43:49 AM »

Thanks for the info. Do you know if there is a specific software it uses? I'm guessing not stuff like DM780 and such, being they're for soundcard modes. Thanks!

Dave WB4IUY
www.WB4IUY.net

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N3QE
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« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2013, 11:36:28 AM »

Thanks for the info. Do you know if there is a specific software it uses? I'm guessing not stuff like DM780 and such, being they're for soundcard modes. Thanks!

Ooh, I dunno what all is in the "Franklin Converter", I thin if you look at some 80's and 90's era articles about SSTV and WEFAX stuff you will find that it is similar and has some dedicated decode or encode hardware for such modes, before PC's commonly had sound cards.

Really, for a soundcard interface, you don't need much. I had been slightly involved in RTTY back in the 1980's but I abandoned all that old stuff long ago. When I got on for RTTY roundup in early 2012, my "interface" was nothing more than alligator clips between PC sound card connectors and rig connectors, and have since made some better (more permanent) cabling.
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