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Author Topic: Type-N Quick Connector - does it exist?  (Read 4885 times)
WS4E
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Posts: 234




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« on: November 22, 2013, 07:02:49 AM »

I was thinking about building a patch panel in the shack for easy switching of antennas/rigs, and I was wondering if there was such a thing as a slip-on style quick connector for Type-N like there is for PL-259.  

I could use all PL-259 I guess, but I like the idea of using Type-N for the rigs, and PL-259 for the antennas, in order to ensure you could not make a rig-to-rig connection on the patch panel with any of the PL-259->N cables.


On second thought, maybe I will just use BNC and PL-259 or just all BNC for the patch panel.  I always liked BNC anyway.  It's a shame they are not used more in HF.

« Last Edit: November 22, 2013, 07:13:50 AM by WS4E » Logged
AF6WL
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Posts: 146




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« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2013, 07:33:12 AM »

That would be the QN connector http://www.rosenberger.com/documents/headquarters_de_en/ba_communication/catalog_coax/14_Chapter_QN.pdf

NB: however QN will not mate with normal N connectors :-(
« Last Edit: November 22, 2013, 07:35:32 AM by AF6WL » Logged
W6UV
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Posts: 540




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« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2013, 09:51:36 AM »

A normal male N connector is a press fit to a female BNC.

Put BNC connectors on the panel and use cables terminated on both ends with N connectors.
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AF6WL
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2013, 12:36:05 PM »

A normal male N connector is a press fit to a female BNC.

Put BNC connectors on the panel and use cables terminated on both ends with N connectors.

Not recommended for anything other than a quick bodge : there is nothing really holding the mating halves together.
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W6UV
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Posts: 540




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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2013, 01:08:05 PM »

A normal male N connector is a press fit to a female BNC.

Put BNC connectors on the panel and use cables terminated on both ends with N connectors.

Not recommended for anything other than a quick bodge : there is nothing really holding the mating halves together.

Works fine for an in-shack patch panel, which is what the original poster was asking about.
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KF5JOT
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2013, 07:58:05 AM »

Much easier to build a two row panel. In the production video world, we had multiple rows of signal patching. Sources were always on one row or panel unit and everything else was on another row or unit. Ireconfigured a couple of our test benches with sources on one panel and the test gear or switcher inputs on a second panel. The second panel was seperated from the first by a blank panel about 4 rack units high. Everythng used the same conenctor...Trumpeter J3's
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W6UV
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Posts: 540




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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2013, 11:30:19 AM »

The C connector is an N connector that uses a bayonet lock just like a BNC does. This is probably better mechanically than using female BNC panel mount connectors and patch cords with male N connectors, but C connectors are a little harder to find.

Digikey has them, but make sure you get the 50 Ohm version, not the 75.
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1586




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« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2013, 07:04:59 AM »

The internals of the Type-N, BNC and TNC connectors are all the same. Of the three the BNC is not rated the same way, due to the construction of the bayonet connection you can get RF leakage through the fingers of the inner shield, past the bayonet keyway. Also it is not as rugged mechanically as it relies upon spring pressure to hold the outer shield in place. You also could get a slight misalignment on a small bayonet connector.

N and TNC are threaded "twist" connectors where there is 100% RF shielding of the inner conductor from outside of the shield(s). The threading covers 100% of the connection and also is a very robust mechanical connection that can be tightened down to keep things in alignment and the center pin under mating contact.

As mentioned there is the QN and Snap-N connectors but they are pricey and not that easy to find. I would not even suggest the GR Type 874 connector (a brain-fart from the 1970's) or APC-7 (designed by someone who wanted to make HP lots and lots of money on test gear).

There are patch-bay connectors and cables that are for video distribution but they are all 75 ohm impedance.

It is evil to say this but an RCA plug "could" be used for a patchbay but the performance would be terrible. BTW, that was one of the original inspirations for the UHF connector that is just an RCA plug with a threaded shell.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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