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Author Topic: Chinese broadcast SW on 40m?  (Read 16880 times)
KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 340




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« on: November 24, 2013, 05:30:34 PM »

The last few days, I've been hearing what sounds like Chinese (or a variant) on 7250 and 7300. It's definitely broadcast stations and not Chinese-speaking hams. It only fades in after 0100 UTC and is gone by 0300. I know that the signal path to East Asia is mostly in daylight at those times, so it's rather surprising. What isn't surprising is that the Chinese would plunk broadcast stations down on the ham bands, although in Asia hams can only use up to 7200 khz so it's acceptable as far as ITU rules go. I know that the US uses 7300-7500 for supposedly "private" religious stn's. Any idea what stations these are? I suppose they're CNR (Chinese domestic network) stations.
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AA4HA
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2013, 07:22:22 PM »

They are up there, along with India and the Vatican.

http://www.short-wave.info/?freq=7250
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
KB4QAA
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Posts: 2260




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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2013, 10:43:36 AM »

International broadcast is authorized from 7200kc and up.

No, the US does not use 7300-7500kc for 'religious broadcast'.  The FCC does not care what the content is!  Wink

I have read last year that the Chinese lease time on a Texas broadcast station for their 40m transmissions around 7300kc, which would account for the strong signal. I typically hear this in beginning late afternoon East Coast time.  I haven't done any digging to confirm that, though I saw it mentioned several times.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2013, 01:40:47 PM »

They are up there, along with India and the Vatican.

http://www.short-wave.info/?freq=7250

Looks like I'm hearing the 0100-0200 tx in Chinese from Urumqi in Xinjiang (East Turkestan). Theoretically, I shouldn't be able to hear it at that hour, as the tx site and most of the path is in daylight. Must be some sort of gray line propagation going on.
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 340




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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2013, 01:43:50 PM »

International broadcast is authorized from 7200kc and up.

No, the US does not use 7300-7500kc for 'religious broadcast'.  The FCC does not care what the content is!  Wink

I have read last year that the Chinese lease time on a Texas broadcast station for their 40m transmissions around 7300kc, which would account for the strong signal. I typically hear this in beginning late afternoon East Coast time.  I haven't done any digging to confirm that, though I saw it mentioned several times.

LOL, not what I meant.  Grin Cheesy I don't remember seeing a question on my General exam about sharing 7200-7300 with international SW bc. I thought that was weird, since the General question pool makes sure to say that 30m is only 200 w PEP allowed and that ham radio is secondary, and makes note of 60m restrictions.
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 459




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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2013, 03:34:44 PM »

International broadcast is authorized from 7200kc and up.

No, the US does not use 7300-7500kc for 'religious broadcast'.  The FCC does not care what the content is!  Wink

I have read last year that the Chinese lease time on a Texas broadcast station for their 40m transmissions around 7300kc, which would account for the strong signal. I typically hear this in beginning late afternoon East Coast time.  I haven't done any digging to confirm that, though I saw it mentioned several times.

I was under the impression that the only SW broadcasts allowed from the USA were the religious ones!  This impression has been formed by listening over the last decade or so.
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K5TEN
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Posts: 143


WWW

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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2013, 07:43:10 PM »

Not all of the signatories of the "evacuate 40m and go above 7.300" deal have complied.

They are playing the gambling odds that most regular people arent radio nerds and that they can continue to QRM the living snot out of Region 2 hams and no one will care. 

I completely DETEST talking about political things on forums/internet because it is a worthless action.
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RENTON481
Member

Posts: 59




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« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2013, 05:27:21 AM »

The last few days, I've been hearing what sounds like Chinese (or a variant) on 7250 and 7300. It's definitely broadcast stations and not Chinese-speaking hams. It only fades in after 0100 UTC and is gone by 0300. I know that the signal path to East Asia is mostly in daylight at those times, so it's rather surprising. What isn't surprising is that the Chinese would plunk broadcast stations down on the ham bands, although in Asia hams can only use up to 7200 khz so it's acceptable as far as ITU rules go. I know that the US uses 7300-7500 for supposedly "private" religious stn's. Any idea what stations these are? I suppose they're CNR (Chinese domestic network) stations.

The Chinese use numerous frequencies on the 41 meter band for domestic and some regional broadcasts. During early morning on the West Coast the 41 meter band (from 7200-7400 or so) is usually covered with Chinese stations, many of them CNR1 or other CNR stations.

Like you mentioned, you may have heard the 41 meter band under the equivalent of grey line or sunset skip conditions.  It usually stays in until several hours after daylight here on the West Coast.
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VK3DWZ
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Posts: 37




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« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2013, 03:09:34 PM »

A quick perusal of the World Radio TV Handbook shows any number of stations (not only Chinese) using 7100-7300kc/s.  Shortwave stations are being shifted above 7300kc/s so that the 40 meter band can be reserved exclusivly for Amateurs.  When this wil  happen is anybody's guess.
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NU1O
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Posts: 2594




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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2014, 11:11:18 PM »

I've heard domestic Chinese broadcasts below 5 Mhz and I live in New England.  Many of their programs run on multiple frequencies and they often broadcast outside of traditional broadcast band allocations.  That's one of the ways you can identify them if the signal is not very strong. 

Get a copy of WRTVH.  They may have the frequencies a given broadcast is in parallel with.  If you have two VFOs you can switch back and forth between frequencies.  It makes it easy to see which are the same programs.

In my winter it's common to hear broadcasts from China and elsewhere several hours before sunset on frequencies from 31 meters and below.

73,

Chris  NU1O
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YO9IRF
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Posts: 29


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« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2014, 12:31:08 AM »

Over here in Eastern Europe these broadcasts are recieved daily, sometimes as low as 7.190, especially strong in summer evenings. There's also a broadcast station somewhere in Africa around 7.115 or so, it was supposed to cease activity since last year but I recieved it just a few weeks ago.
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ZL2MC
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2014, 11:47:49 AM »

The 40m band above 7.200MHz allocation here in NZ clearly states:
Quote
These frequencies are, or may be, allocated for use by other services. Amateur operators must accept interference from, and must not cause interference to, such other services.

WRTVH is out of date by the times it's published. Up to date info is obtained daily from...

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/swskeds/

Cheers - Martin
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NU1O
Member

Posts: 2594




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« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2014, 02:57:03 PM »

The 40m band above 7.200MHz allocation here in NZ clearly states:
Quote
These frequencies are, or may be, allocated for use by other services. Amateur operators must accept interference from, and must not cause interference to, such other services.

WRTVH is out of date by the times it's published. Up to date info is obtained daily from...

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/swskeds/

Cheers - Martin

Thanks for the tip, Martin.  That looks like a very good site and I've bookmarked it so I can join.  I agree WRTVH can be irrelevant with a big broadcaster that's always changing their schedule but I don't think the Chinese domestic broadcasts do a lot of frequency hopping or make many time changes.  I'm far from an expert, however.

73,

Chris  NU1O

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