Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Nevada couple that went missing and amateur radio  (Read 9269 times)
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« on: December 11, 2013, 02:30:36 PM »

I was relieved to hear of the Nevada couple and the children that were with them being found yesterday afternoon, without any serious complications.  It seems the couple and children decided to go play in the snow in a rather rugged and remote part of the state.  The jeep that they were riding in overturned, and they became stranded in the cold wilderness, some 70 miles from any city where they could get help.  What apparently helped in the rescue effort was the fact that they told someone where they were going, and they took plenty of food and water, though no blankets, along.  This, along with heating rocks at night to stay warm, very likely saved their lives.  Rescuers tracked the "ping" from the man's cell phone, until it became too weak to get a fix.  It seems they were in an area so remote and mountainous that the cell coverage was very spotty.
     This is not the first time something like this has happened, and I have to wonder if they would have been rescued a lot sooner had they had even a simple HF radio, VHF or UHF transceiver, or even a SSB CB radio.  I remember reading a story in S9 Magazine from around 1980 of a somewhat similar event that occurred in Nevada to two men.  It seems the men decided to go out exploring in a remote part of Nevada in their jeep or truck.  The men became stuck in some mud, and were unable to get the truck free.  The truck was equipped with a CB radio, and one of the men decided to try calling for help on Channel 9.  Their distress call was received by a REACT monitoring station in Frankfort, Kentucky.  The men were soon found and the truck was freed from the mud.  While I am not familiar with the part of Nevada where the couple and children were lost, it seems that even something as simple as taking along a QRP CW rig or 2 meter HT would be better than nothing.  They also now sell something akin to an EPERB for emergencies like this.  The most important thing in a situation like this is to always let someone know where you are going, which the couple did.  If I can extol the value of ham radio for a second, I would have taken even a simple rig like the ones I suggested along.  The SFI has been relatively high the last week or two, and 10 meters was open somewhat today, so even trying to put out a MAYDAY call on an SSB CB radio where some of the skip shooters hang out would probably have worked.  Just wanted to get some other thoughts on the issue.  Thanks gang!

73,
Mike KU4UV
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1714




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2013, 03:07:04 PM »

 Yes, any type of communications such as you mentioned may have helped for a quicker rescue, but the crucial point is that they were prudent enough to take care of necessities first such as letting some one know your plans,  shelter(jeep), water, and heat, you can survive without food for a couple weeks but they were prepared for that as well.   
Logged
WI8P
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2013, 04:06:01 PM »

In the case mentioned, unless the Jeep had an AGM battery, how long would you expect the one in it to last upside down?  Same question would apply if the battery case had cracked or broken during the accident.  I'm not trying to be a smart azz, just asking.
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2013, 04:27:53 PM »

In the case mentioned, unless the Jeep had an AGM battery, how long would you expect the one in it to last upside down?  Same question would apply if the battery case had cracked or broken during the accident.  I'm not trying to be a smart azz, just asking.

 :-\Yes, I get that, but you could also bring along a couple of lantern batteries or something similar.  An HT with fresh batteries wouldn'tneed a car battery necessarily.
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2557




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2013, 04:50:52 PM »

Quote
What apparently helped in the rescue effort was the fact that they told someone where they were going, and they took plenty of food and water, though no blankets, along.

This week's Darwin Award winner. At least they wouldn't die of thirst... in the snow.

Then there was that Euro rocker last summer who decided he and his girlfriend needed to visit a remote Death Valley landmark in his rented car. They weren't so lucky. Ever see a map of those remote areas?  They are full of warnings, usually in the form of skulls and crossbones.

Every car in our family is stocked with spare gloves, hats and clothes. And I've never heard of any motorist dying from exposure in suburban St. Louis.
Logged
N7BMW
Member

Posts: 117




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2013, 05:12:42 PM »

The newest versions of the 406 Mhz EPIRBs are called PLBs - Personal Locator Beacons.  They are very compact and not expensive.  A very good service for people going on excursions would be to be able to rent one for a few days of weeks.  Due to the PLB's low cost and the high cost of search and rescue these would even be an economic advantage for parks authorities to make them available.  Maybe even just lend them out for a fully refundable security deposit.

Boat/US was (maybe they still do) rent EPIRBS for boaters to take on their cruising holidays.
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2013, 06:12:02 PM »

Quote
What apparently helped in the rescue effort was the fact that they told someone where they were going, and they took plenty of food and water, though no blankets, along.

This week's Darwin Award winner. At least they wouldn't die of thirst... in the snow.

Then there was that Euro rocker last summer who decided he and his girlfriend needed to visit a remote Death Valley landmark in his rented car. They weren't so lucky. Ever see a map of those remote areas?  They are full of warnings, usually in the form of skulls and crossbones.

Every car in our family is stocked with spare gloves, hats and clothes. And I've never heard of any motorist dying from exposure in suburban St. Louis.

Yes, the boy scout motto holds true, be prepared.  Unfortunately, in a lot of these tragic situations, people don't prepare.
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3860




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2013, 07:29:46 PM »

Has anyone else noticed that these "Darwin Award Winners" seldom, if ever, prepare for an emergency?

Along with the situation these folks found themselves in, there are those who are also Darwin Award contenders that will follow a GPS route to hell!  Invariably they will follow a GPS route on a nice road and when it indicates they should turn off onto a narrow, dirt and road full of ruts, they will do it "because the GPS says this is the way were supposed to go!"

I'm beginning to this is a natural culling process.

Al - K8AXW
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2013, 11:21:29 PM »

Has anyone else noticed that these "Darwin Award Winners" seldom, if ever, prepare for an emergency?

Along with the situation these folks found themselves in, there are those who are also Darwin Award contenders that will follow a GPS route to hell!  Invariably they will follow a GPS route on a nice road and when it indicates they should turn off onto a narrow, dirt and road full of ruts, they will do it "because the GPS says this is the way were supposed to go!"

I'm beginning to this is a natural culling process.

Al - K8AXW

Excellent point.  Anyone remember that episode of "The Office" where Michael and Dwight drove the rental car into the lake because the GPS told them to do so?
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2557




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2013, 06:38:25 AM »

They were easy to find. Just look for the two dumbest people on Earth.

"The Jeep had been seen Sunday “doing wheelies or doughnuts” [with the 4 kids inside?] at a mining camp in Seven Troughs, a dispatch supervisor said. Officials said the couple had not taken food or water with them."

Did they have seat belts for all 4 kids? That small Jeep model is known for being top heavy


Logged
K7RBW
Member

Posts: 392




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2013, 09:06:19 AM »

I'm all for being prepared, but being prepared includes knowing how to avoid situations that cause you to use your preparations.

I used to have a 4WD and go wheelin' a bunch and it seems like on every trip we'd encounter someone in a Jeep wondering how in the world they could get stuck when they had "4-wheel drive"--like it was some sort of magic, get-out-of-trouble device. I would argue that the reason you don't hear about prepared people getting into trouble as often as unprepared people is that the prepared people have thought about the problems and contingencies enough to not only be ready for them but to avoid them.

I'm glad no one was hurt.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5887




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2013, 10:15:31 AM »

I'm all for being prepared, but being prepared includes knowing how to avoid situations that cause you to use your preparations.

I used to have a 4WD and go wheelin' a bunch and it seems like on every trip we'd encounter someone in a Jeep wondering how in the world they could get stuck when they had "4-wheel drive"--like it was some sort of magic, get-out-of-trouble device. I would argue that the reason you don't hear about prepared people getting into trouble as often as unprepared people is that the prepared people have thought about the problems and contingencies enough to not only be ready for them but to avoid them.

I'm glad no one was hurt.

A Jeep on snow on trails like that is a accident waiting to happen. Driver used poor judgement. If he had chained up at least one axle with tire chains this would not of happened. A short wheelbase Jeep gets in trouble quick with it is slippery and rolls easy. I once say a accident about 8 miles from here where a Jeep spun out on a icy overpass on highway and went into median. It was okay but then less than a minute later ANOTHER Jeep did same thing and slammed into side of one in median. Only thing that saved that drive was it slammed into his passenger side and no one was in it too and it was crushed to center of cabin from side. Driver was bloody but okay. I stayed with him till medics got there. He though he was fine in his Jeep till that day and did not plan to replace it.   
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2557




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2013, 12:16:42 PM »

Here's "Mom" from her Facebook page. The press has praised the couple for their ingenuity. Is that a topo map I see? It even shows the ravine the Jeep was stuck in. 
Logged
WI8P
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2013, 12:31:08 PM »

Here's "Mom" from her Facebook page. The press has praised the couple for their ingenuity. Is that a topo map I see? It even shows the ravine the Jeep was stuck in. 


LOL!!!
Logged
KU4UV
Member

Posts: 376




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2013, 01:06:51 PM »

Here's "Mom" from her Facebook page. The press has praised the couple for their ingenuity. Is that a topo map I see? It even shows the ravine the Jeep was stuck in. 


Yes, I have to agree with you on that point.  The couple didn't look like the sharpest tools in the shed by a long shot!
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!