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Author Topic: what does hrd do verus dxlab?  (Read 22653 times)
AA6YQ
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« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2014, 09:01:30 AM »

I have downloaded DXLab, but I haven't had time to take it for a spin.

If you have questions about DXLab, Marty, don't hesitate to send them my way.

       73,

             Dave, AA6YQ
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W4PC
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« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2014, 10:43:19 AM »

Ham Radio Deluxe is a crappy digital modes program.
It hy jacks your computer and it installs programs that are mostly hidden that you will have a real hard time deleting unless you have a software program such as REVO to remove it.

Even if you try to delete it and install another digital program such as FlDigi, it will interfere with how it works and you will have problems as long as the artifacts are still in your computer.


1. Your call please? hams dont use CB handles! Smiley
2. The above is total falsehood, please stop spreading misinformation
3. Without your call, everything you stated is invalid, even with your call, it still is.


DM-780 doesnt need any 3rd party programs to any of the supported digital modes, it's all in DM-780.  For support of 3rd party programs, you'd have to talk to the author of the main program, then to the author of the 3rd party program. Many times, this turns into finger pointing and drives the end user mad!

Since HRD is all inclusive, full radio support, Logging, Digital modes, satellites, rotor control and more, you have all you need in the one suite and one place to go for support.

Thanks to the support of the 13,000+ hams (I havent counted last weeks sales, so it could be closer to 14,000 now) we've been able to create jobs for 13 hams that were either retired or bored, or out of work and needed a job,

75% of HRD revenue went to paying them, 20% was for hamfests and advertising and the remaining 5% was for incidentals, like making CDs, website costs...and software purchases for programming and testing (we use VS 2013 Ultimate for the development environment. Which includes Test and other QA tools).

I know we have 1.4 million lines of code.  My guess is the other products have a smaller code set since they have less features, as well as they are written in higher level languages like Basic and Pascal.  When I was coding LogWindows back from 1999-2003 (in C++ btw) it only had 195,000 lines of code, and all that did was logging.

At any rate, back to creating keys while Erin and Time take the weekend off, while I typed this we got 6 orders...  amazing.

BTW, Erik , I and the team are hard at work on 6.2 and hope to have an open beta next week. Then it's off to hamfests in Puerto Rico, Miami and finally Orlando.

Rick - W4PC

« Last Edit: January 05, 2014, 11:16:15 AM by W4PC » Logged
WA9PIE
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« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2014, 11:25:57 AM »

Ham Radio Deluxe is a crappy digital modes program.
It hy jacks your computer and it installs programs that are mostly hidden that you will have a real hard time deleting unless you have a software program such as REVO to remove it.

Even if you try to delete it and install another digital program such as FlDigi, it will interfere with how it works and you will have problems as long as the artifacts are still in your computer.

Wow... while the quality of HRD as a digital modes program is subjective... the remainder of this account is COMPLETELY false.

I may just create a video up on our YouTube channel just to prove this false.

www.youtube.com/hrdsoftware

But this post is likely not from a registered HRD user.  So I would give it very little credibility.

Mike, WA9PIE
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N0IU
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« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2014, 11:55:23 AM »

Here is what he said in another thread:

Or they held a tech plus license, which means that they passed the written portion of the exam but could not pass the code.

And here I thought that when someone was a Tech Plus (way back in the dark ages) that they had passed the Novice and Technician written tests PLUS the 5 wpm code test.


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W4PC
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« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2014, 01:29:28 PM »

Here is what he said in another thread:

Or they held a tech plus license, which means that they passed the written portion of the exam but could not pass the code.

And here I thought that when someone was a Tech Plus (way back in the dark ages) that they had passed the Novice and Technician written tests PLUS the 5 wpm code test.




I was a tech in 1981.. 5 WPM code, general class exam.... tech plus was with code, tech was not.

He's clueless, and wrong.. again Wink

from http://www.w5yi.org/page.php?id=16

Technician Plus Study Materials
The next step used to be called the "Technician Plus" class. This level was eliminated as a separate operator class on April 15, 2000 -- but not the privileges. A Technician Class operator who passed the 5 words-per-minute Morse code (Element 1) exam received CW (telegraphy) and 10-meter voice privileges in four long distance short-wave bands in the HF range (3-30 MHz), the same as the Tech Plus operator did previously but they do not get issued another license. Their authorization to operate on four CW bands below 30 MHz is conferred by the Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination (CSCE) issued by the VE (examining) team.

And like the Novice and Advanced Class, operators who held a Tech Plus license on April 15, 2000 may modify their license (change their address, call sign or name) indefinitely. Their new modified Tech Plus license will still show the Tech Plus Class when it arrives.

But (unlike Novice and Advanced Class operators) Tech Plus licensees who renew their licenses will be issued a Technician Class license. Again, it still authorizes HF privileges just as the Tech Plus license did previously. Their authorization to operate on four CW bands below 30 MHz and 10-meter voice segment is conferred by the:

(1.) Certificate of Successful Completion of Examination (CSCE) previously issued by the VE (examining) team or
(2.) a previous copy of your Tech Plus license.
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N0IU
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« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2014, 02:20:33 PM »

He's clueless, and wrong.. again Wink

I lived through that era too! I am well aware of the differences but was just pointing out that Mr. Hurr E. Caine does not!
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W4PC
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« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2014, 02:33:14 PM »

He's clueless, and wrong.. again Wink

I lived through that era too! I am well aware of the differences but was just pointing out that Mr. Hurr E. Caine does not!

Yup and I got your back on that one.

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HURRICAINE
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« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2014, 07:35:04 PM »


But I don't have to use HRD. I have DigiPan, EhoCW, FLdigi, Airlink Express, and a few other also installed. I don't run them at the same time, but they all function properly and work through the same ports that HRD uses. With the exception of the serial port that talks to the IC-735. I keep that separate. My interface to the sound card in the PC is a couple of shielded cables with appropriate connectors. PTT and CW keying is done by a USB to Serial port converter and a 1 transistor interface.


Digipan is good if you have a old computer and you do not want to dedicate a lot of memory space to a digital program, or if you have a old computer with a slow clock speed.  You don't need to have much of a computer to use DiGiPan - but it doesn't do all of the modes and neither it nor HRD does everything necessary to do NBEMS..
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K7MEM
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« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2014, 04:06:35 AM »


But I don't have to use HRD. I have DigiPan, EhoCW, FLdigi, Airlink Express, and a few other also installed. I don't run them at the same time, but they all function properly and work through the same ports that HRD uses. With the exception of the serial port that talks to the IC-735. I keep that separate. My interface to the sound card in the PC is a couple of shielded cables with appropriate connectors. PTT and CW keying is done by a USB to Serial port converter and a 1 transistor interface.

Digipan is good if you have a old computer and you do not want to dedicate a lot of memory space to a digital program, or if you have a old computer with a slow clock speed.  You don't need to have much of a computer to use DiGiPan - but it doesn't do all of the modes and neither it nor HRD does everything necessary to do NBEMS..

But for me, that doesn't matter. I don't use NBEMS. But if I wanted to use NBEMS, I have FlDigi, Flarq, and Flamp. You can get more information on NBEMS from http://www.arrl.org/nbems. I just choose the application that works for me.

I do have several old computers. It just depends on how old is old. Of the PC variety, but not my oldest computer, I have a Sub Note Laptop that runs Windows 3.1. I think it has a whopping 8 or 16 MB of memory (I don't remember which.). On it I run a DOS based CW RX/TX program that was written in C. I built the system about 20 years ago and it runs through a home brew interface. It still does better at copying CW than any of the new sound card based decoders. It still has old versions of Turbo-C, MSWord, Excel, and MSDraw.

But I do have newer computers. I have all of the programs previously mentioned on a Windows 7, 64 Bit, Laptop, and on a Windows XP desktop (shack computer). The DOS program mentioned above also works on these computers. I have never really had any issues with memory or speed, but then, I don't run them all at the same time. The only issue I have ever had is with my virus scan software on the XP desktop. When the system is booted, the scanner is very active and runs at a high priority. I either have to wait for it to calm down, which it does after a few minutes. I can also simply turn off the virus scanner or raise the priority of the program I am running.
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Martin - K7MEM

http://www.k7mem.com
N3DT
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« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2014, 08:15:53 AM »

I've used a few digi programs, and the one I like best is HRD.  I'm using the old free version because it does everything I want.  Also use MULTIPSK which works fine for what it is. also some stand alone PSK programs.  I've tried DXLab, but find the interface not much to my liking.  The more I use HRD, the more I get used to it. It certainly doesn't seem to hog my computer.

.02
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N0IU
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« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2014, 08:30:20 AM »

Also use MULTIPSK which works fine for what it is.

The GUI on MultiPSK gives me a headache!
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K9IUQ
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« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2014, 09:43:19 AM »

I've tried DXLab, but find the interface not much to my liking.

The GUI on MultiPSK gives me a headache!

The worst Ham software GUI is a close race between MultiPsk and DxLabs..  Cheesy
Neither give me a headache because I would have to be desperate to use either one.

Ham Radio Deluxe is a crappy digital modes program.

FALSE. Anyone who does not know how to spell Hurricane to be anonymous has NO VALIDITY whatsoever. Your lack of ham knowledge here and in other threads only shows why you have to be anonymous. I would be ashamed making posts like yours too and would want to be Hilltopper or Bigboy or Bubba or anything but K9IUQ..... Cheesy Cheesy

Stan K9IUQ

« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 09:45:30 AM by K9IUQ » Logged
KD8MJR
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« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2014, 10:53:00 AM »

I have used both and I decided to pay the money and get HRD 6.X
It's vastly superior and is really the only ham radio program you will ever need.
I have never had any problems installing it or removing it from a PC, so I don't know where that other poster got his info from.

The thing I like about HRD the most is that it's a fully integrated program so you don't have to load several completely different pieces of software to do something.  HRD transfers information from one module to another, so if you contact a station in the digital mode it will add the contact to the logging module.

There is a lot of bitter feelings toward HRD 6.x because HRD 5.x was a free piece of software and many thousands of Hams helped to develop it, but the software writer ran out of steam and after years of stagnation the software was bought out and rewritten by the new owners and was no longer free.

You can get 5.x but 6.x is so much better and I should know I have both on my computer.

The numerous bugs and problems in 5.x plus the lack of support makes it a non starter for me.  Yes you have some forum support but in the end for most problems the answer you will get is that it "Does not do that" or "Its a known issue".  These 5.x guys are great but they don't have the source code to fix the problems and even if they did it's a moot issue because even the HRD  creator could not fix the issues, the simple fact is that the software got so big and complicated it out grew the dated computer language it was written in and hence why the new owners had to rewrite it from scratch in a more modern PC language.   

I would say try 6.x for 30 days and if you don't like it or don't think it's worth the money go get 5.x but I am pretty sure that after using 6.x you will not be happy with the lack of features and the numerous bugs in 5.x and you will find out like I did that 6.x is well worth the money.
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AA6YQ
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« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2014, 12:09:19 PM »

I have used both and I decided to pay the money and get HRD 6.X
It's vastly superior and is really the only ham radio program you will ever need.

Every user is entitled to his or her opinion of what they need, and what's best for them. Many DXLab users started with an application they paid for, and then switched; for some examples, see the eHam reviews. For more examples, join the DXLab Yahoo Group, and ask.

Functionality that DXLab provides above and beyond the usual "logging and transceiver control" is summarized in What Makes DXLab Different.

As the reviews demonstrate, DXers choose DXLab because it's reliable and effective at enabling them to achieve their DXing objectives. That means minimizing time spent on "paperwork", and maximizing time spent in band openings where the DX stations you need have been active.

    73,

          Dave, AA6YQ
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K9IUQ
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« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2014, 01:07:42 PM »

Functionality that DXLab provides above and beyond the usual "logging and transceiver control"
          Dave, AA6YQ

Blah blah, advertisement, blah, more DXLab blah blah. Give it up Dave. eham needs to spank you like Wiki did.....  Wink

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:AA6YQ

Stan K9IUQ
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