Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: An informal poll regarding contesting, ethics and regulations  (Read 29613 times)
N4OI
Member

Posts: 210




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2014, 05:41:08 AM »

CW: cross-mode

73
Logged
K8AC
Member

Posts: 1477




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2014, 07:28:33 AM »

Quote
But seriously folks, who really gives a RA?

Thanks to all who commented on this question.  In response to the person who asked the question quoted above, EVERYONE should care.  If everyone operated where they chose, regardless of regulations, the result would be even more chaos than we hear today.  About half of the stations I've written OO cards to regarding the 7.125 MHz band edge admitted to either being careless or not understanding that their lower sideband extended below the frequency shown on their digital readout.  The other half respond with comments like: "mind your own business", "you can't tell me what to do", "your receiver must be off calibration", etc.  In using the 7.126 frequency as an example, I was being conservative.  It's not unusual to hear a pileup of US stations calling  a DX station on 7.123 MHz in a contest.  In one SSB DX contest earlier this year, I decided to see how many stations I could copy in one hour who were operating out of the band.  During that period, two strong stations, one in Europe and one in South America, were calling CQ DX just below the band edge and I copied a total of 105 U.S. station calls in one hour.  I missed another ten or so because the call couldn't be understood.

As many of you know, the chances of any of the violators ever hearing from the FCC are just about nil.  Even if they do, the worst that will happen is they'll get a letter of warning asking for an explanation.  One would think that the contest sponsors might care about this behavior, but apparently not.  So, guess that leaves us with just one good reason to follow the rule in this case - it's just the right thing to do.  And, the CW guys who operate just below 7.125 even during SSB contests will probably appreciate it. 
Logged
NM0O
Member

Posts: 7




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2014, 06:46:05 PM »

I've been a ham for 35 years, and in all that time I've never understood those who hold the hobby too lightly. It took a lot of work for me to become and remain a licensed operator, and it would be very disturbing to lose my privileges for anything that could properly be described as "stupid."

Jon
NM0O
Logged
K5TED
Member

Posts: 748




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2014, 08:19:13 PM »

There will always be those who choose not to abide by the rules or even gentleman's agreements, or basic ethics. We hear them every day, jumping in with their calls in the middle of DX QSOs', gorilla calling, and generally being horses asses. They are morons.
Logged
KV7W
Member

Posts: 136




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2014, 09:38:30 AM »

You're a continental USA station operating in a SSB DX contest and a multiplier you need badly (in fact, a new country overall for you) is calling CQ contest on 7.126000 MHz.  Which of these options would you choose?

1. Not bother calling him because to do so would mean you were operating out of the SSB band segment for the USA
2. Work him - it's OK because your transceiver readout says it's above your SSB band segment edge
3. Work him - you'd be out of the band, but there are no consequences to that

What would you do?

Quote
CW: cross-mode

N4OI - that's how I would do it.

Work him just a little below 7.126 using cw. He'll either respond, so you can ask him to move up, or he'll move up to get away from you.

Just curious - say he was on 7.123 ssb and it was pretty apparent he didn't know cw, would it be QRM to chase him to the US voice portion using cw? I'm not asking if it's good operating practice, but is it legal?
Logged
NS0R
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2014, 05:59:04 PM »

Another reason to go to CW, no amateur band limits.
Logged
K1DA
Member

Posts: 514




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: July 16, 2014, 10:16:49 AM »

How about an "ethics" question on operating "low power" on Field Day but using KW amps to "overcome line loss".  Yes, there is a club which does it,  admits it, and has ARRL "officials" as members.  Just look at a certain Field Day score from Vermont. 
Logged
KB3LIX
Member

Posts: 1113




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2014, 09:32:57 PM »

I roll right past him and chalk it up to "better luck next time"
Logged
N7SCC
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2014, 12:49:16 AM »

I agree, answer #1... It took a long time to acquire skill and knowledge; I worked very hard to get to the Extra Class. Besides, it's very good operating practice to stay in the band using SSB. Anyone and everyone who worked hard at passing the FCC exams and code tests... knows about the aspect of SSB being out of the band limits. Having previously been an OO with ARRL/FCC, I really learned a lot more about operating and came to further appreciate what we have as operators within the US Amateur Service. I'm grateful to those who have kept privileges available to US Amateurs. Sincerely, and '73; N7SCC George.
Logged
KK5DR
Member

Posts: 84


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2014, 03:20:02 PM »

You must understand that as far as contesting, dxing, and dexpeditions go, there are NO rules.
At least that's what a large number of operators act like.
The most powerful stations (usually running at or well above legal limit), are the top on the contester food chain. The "little guys" (everyone else that is participating), get the scraps.
Courtesy, ethics, playing by the rules, all go out the window when the heat of competition reaches it's peak.
These are the reasons why most dx stations do not engage in ragchews, because they can't. Every time they end a transmission, there is the angry beehive roar that fills their receiver, all coming from North America! The only dx stations that still get in the air during these contests instruct those wanting a confirmation QSL card, to "be sure to include SASE and green stamps", so basically they are making money because the stations in the US are foolish.
It's all for what? A piece of paper to put on your wall, or your name in CQ mag?
I can think of a million other things to do that are more constructive.
Logged
SHORTWIRE
Member

Posts: 30




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2014, 03:05:59 PM »

You must understand that as far as contesting, dxing, and dexpeditions go, there are NO rules.
At least that's what a large number of operators act like.
The most powerful stations (usually running at or well above legal limit), are the top on the contester food chain. The "little guys" (everyone else that is participating), get the scraps.
Courtesy, ethics, playing by the rules, all go out the window when the heat of competition reaches it's peak.
These are the reasons why most dx stations do not engage in ragchews, because they can't. Every time they end a transmission, there is the angry beehive roar that fills their receiver, all coming from North America! The only dx stations that still get in the air during these contests instruct those wanting a confirmation QSL card, to "be sure to include SASE and green stamps", so basically they are making money because the stations in the US are foolish.
It's all for what? A piece of paper to put on your wall, or your name in CQ mag?
I can think of a million other things to do that are more constructive.

VERY Well said!

If they can't ragchew, they are just a Noise-Bot.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!