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Author Topic: Do you call CQ or pounce?  (Read 16569 times)
WA9CFK
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Posts: 98




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« on: January 24, 2014, 08:30:18 AM »

I am curious. When working QRP with CW do you call CQ or do you wait for others to call, then answer them?

I do both but I have had better luck answering the other persons call. 
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12907




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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2014, 08:42:09 AM »

I've done both but am most successful when calling other stations. If I'm running QRP levels there's usually not a lot of point in calling very weak stations who are running 100W or more.
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WB0FDJ
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Posts: 147




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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2014, 09:09:02 AM »

A lot of QRPers recommend hunt and pounce. I've found that it will usually produce some results if I really want to make a QSO.

But with the QRP watering holes so well known amongst the brethren, I find myself sitting in the shack, doing other things and monitoring 14.060 during the day. If I were tempted to call CQ (which I rarely do), I'd do it on one of the known QRP frequencies first. My luck there has been good, even with the Rockmite.

WB0FDJ Doc
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3910




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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2014, 10:03:32 AM »

I really don't want to get into another QRP vs. QRO discussion but let me explain the facts of life about QRP.

You call CQ.  Ops tuning around the band hear your CQ and walk on by because it's human nature to go for or look for the loudest signal because it's just easier to copy a loud signal vs. a weak one. As humans we are basically lazy.

If you hear and pounce.....rather it's answering a CQ or tailgating, most times the station will respond to your call out of courtesy.  This is why the success rating for the later is much higher than calling CQ. 

 
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1777




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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2014, 10:28:33 AM »

  I do both about equally, mostly on the 20/30/40m QRP H2O holes and have fun either way especially when I CQ on a supposedly dead or quiet band and get a call back out of nowhere like early this morning before the 20m grey lines opens up from Europe I sent out a CQ on 14.060 (band was dead?) and got a call back and 20 min. QSO with Doug K9DLT in Lake Havasu City AZ. from here in ME. with 5 watts and my Hex beamed NE to Europe. You never know.
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F8WBD
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Posts: 74




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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2014, 01:07:05 AM »

I would say that my ratio is 30% call, 70% pounce. I never advertise "QRP" after my call...except when CQing on the accepted QRP frequencies. Reason, I have observed more and more QRO stations there (they have the right). Listening to their traffic, 100 watts frequently given. So, I let others know I am running 5 watts and less.
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WA9CFK
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Posts: 98




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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2014, 04:57:55 PM »

I think many hams go for the strongest signal, it is easier. I will go for the rather weak signal because it may be another qrp or dx.

However, if there NO weak signals I will jump on the strongest CQ also.

I have never figured out why the qro ops park on the qrp call frequencies?


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LA9XSA
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Posts: 376




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« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2014, 01:37:09 AM »

I don't call CQ a lot, mostly I respond. I mostly work voice though, just a few CW and digital contacts in my log.

I usually try to call even the weak sounding stations a couple of times. Sometimes they have better ears, a better receiver or more quiet locations than the stronger sounding ones, so even if the weak sounding station is running 100 watts or more I might get a 55 while I hear him just 42 or 53.
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W7ASA
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Posts: 260




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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2014, 07:19:21 AM »

BOTH -

I am fortunate to live in a low RF noise area and have a Windom up at a bit over 90 feet.  That being the case, the weak ones are not fighting through very much in the way of local RF noise.  If near a QRP watering hole, (+-5) I will often go for the weak ones who are sometimes QRP'ers.  That thought has proven to be more ASSUMPTION than fact, however, because I've had so many good rag chews with people I assumed were 100 Watt stations and they me, yet when we got around to discussing radio types and etc. turns out that the QRK4/5 was from 2 way QRP.  Propagation and antenna are the major factors and receiver after that - not power. I'll happily take my ~2S-unit discount for 5 Watts re: 100 W, as long as I can have a good antenna and a ham on the other end who understands how to use his CW filters.

It's truly unfortunate that so many hams are chained in HOA's and covenants which forbid reasonable antennas on their own property. It's increasingly common for me to talk with hams using antennas along the line of a temporary mobile whip on a tripod, running high power, because it's what they can get away with at night, then put it away before anyone can see his 'offensive structure'.

I LISTEN a lot and take enjoyment from it, call CQ, pounce if a station sounds interesting.



73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._  ._


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KATEKEBO
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Posts: 117




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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2014, 09:44:47 AM »

90% of the time I answer other people calling CQ or QRZ.  If I can hear them with a solid S9 signal, odds are that they will be able to hear me around S6 (assuming they are running QRO, and I am doing only 5W).

I sometimes call CQ when the band is clearly open.  With QRP it's a 50/50 - sometimes somebody will answer, sometimes nobody answers after several attempts.

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WA9CFK
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Posts: 98




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« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2014, 07:59:57 AM »

ASA is certainly correct about propagation and antennas. You can never have too much of either.  Wink

Being one who stalks the night, on 80 meters it is not so much the propagation as the noise. The best antenna I have found so far is my 80 meter loop because it is quiet compared to my 160m Inverted L.

I load both of these antennas on 80, 40 and 30 meters and so far the loop, though it is only 45 feet high, wins every time.

The reason that most folks run 100 watts is because that has become the norm. If the manufacturers had settled on 50 watts or 150 watts most hams would be just as happy.
 
There are many reasons why some like the challenge of QRP, for me it is the last frontier of the home brew tinkerer; and it is an effective way to communicate. But that is for another post.   
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K7NSW
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Posts: 58




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« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2014, 09:54:56 PM »

TO WA9CFK: I am QRO and often stalk the QRP freqs. Here is why I do it. I am in Idaho. Many QRP ops are chasing states for various awards and Idaho is not as easy to find as others. Too often a qso starts out ok and is then killed by someone finding the freq and cannot hear the QRP qso in progress. So he/she fires off the customary QRL?, hears nothing again and starts calling cq. That kills the qso and no Idaho qsl for the op who needed it and is 339 in my receiver with qsb all over him. I Use QRO if necessary to hold the freq and complete the qso. No other way works. There are several QRP ops who have my Idaho card on their wall because I do this. So far, no one has called me down for it. If qro is not needed my amp stays in standby mode. Call me altruistic if that fits. There are states I have waited long times to finally confirm. To "do the right thing"' I pay it forward by getting on and providing an Idaho contact when I do not need another card from the huge easier to get states. My qro makes it happen and I mail out the cards.
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K8AG
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Posts: 352




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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2014, 05:28:35 AM »

I am curious. When working QRP with CW do you call CQ or do you wait for others to call, then answer them?

I do both but I have had better luck answering the other persons call. 

Me too.  I just can't resist answering a CQ.
72, JP, K8AG
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KB1GMX
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Posts: 787




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« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2014, 09:15:30 AM »

The answer is yes!  I do both, mostly depending on conditions.  At least twice I've run
a frequency QRP, the TA33JR [triband beam] may have helped there!


Allison
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WA2TPU
Member

Posts: 210




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« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2014, 03:58:38 PM »

My answer is YES! I do both. At 318 countries(316 confirmed) thus far ...I assure you  that one must do both to get the results you might want.....that I have achieved. And NO I AM NOT BRAGGING.....JUST SHARING.PERIOD!!  It has taken me years upon years with steadfast patience and an absolute determination to get those 318....but for me it has been worth the efforts to over-come  the challenges that Qrp operations presented to me during EACH QSO. Bluntly put, the thrill of working DX with 5 watts or less on a antenna that you made...well...in the many decades of being a Qrper...... THAT THRILL OF WORKING DX HAS NEVER LEFT ME. I HOPE IT NEVER WILL.
Best regards with many 72 to all my fellow Brother and Sister Qrpers.
Enjoy our hobby of Qrping.
C  U on the bands....
GD DX
Don sr. -- WA2TPU/Qrp-- A TRUE ALL AMERICAN MADE 5 WATT QRP GREEN STATION.
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