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Author Topic: Snow and HF  (Read 9031 times)
WX2S
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Posts: 735




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« on: January 21, 2014, 02:53:12 PM »

I'm seeing a lot of QRM on 40 now in the snowstorm. Static bursts. Could the snow be causing it?

73, wx2s.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
W8JX
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Posts: 6060




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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2014, 02:59:03 PM »

My guess here is arcing on insulators on power lines from snow build up that 85 being burnt off
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W6QW
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2014, 03:42:33 PM »

Another possibility is electrostatic buildup on your antenna if the antenna is not at DC ground potential.  I have personally gotten zapped by a static buildup on a large vertical antenna during a rain storm (as you probably remember, your coax is a capacitance to ground from the coax center conductor if that center conductor is not at DC ground potential).  A quick test by disconnecting the antenna and placing the center conductor about 1/32 to 1/16 inch from DC ground will yield an occasional spark if EMF buildup is your culprit.
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WA2ONH
Member

Posts: 259




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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2014, 04:40:00 PM »

LINK: http://www.repeater-builder.com/products/static-buster/buster.html

ELECTROSTATIC RECEIVER NOISE
By Mike Norton KE4NS

"Precipitation Static

This occurs when electrically charged particles (raindrops, snow, dust, etc.) strike the antenna tower, antenna boom or elements, inducing a current impulse in the element and thereby producing broadband noise. This noise called precipitation static is generally defined to include all external atmospheric electrical effects which produce electromagnetic interference."
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73 de WA2ONH dit dit    ...Charlie
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KS2G
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Posts: 428




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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2014, 04:12:59 AM »

I'm seeing a lot of QRM on 40 now in the snowstorm. Static bursts.

Just to pick a nit:

That would be QRN ("N" for noise).

QRM is interference ("M" for man-made).

See: http://www.ac6v.com/Qsignals.htm

73,
Mel - KS2G

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KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 387




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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2014, 01:21:08 PM »

I'm seeing a lot of QRM on 40 now in the snowstorm. Static bursts.

Just to pick a nit:

That would be QRN ("N" for noise).

QRM is interference ("M" for man-made).

See: http://www.ac6v.com/Qsignals.htm

73,
Mel - KS2G



I always remembered it by "N for Natural noise, M for Man-made noise". In reality, the M and N don't mean anything. But if a little mnemonic helps, great.
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