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Author Topic: convert a 2 meter mobile to business band  (Read 3297 times)
KB1VIK
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Posts: 4




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« on: January 28, 2014, 05:38:50 PM »

I work in traffic control as a flagger and we use Motorola CP200 HTs
Im not sure what the 3 frequencies are, although I think one of them is 151.300, or something close to that
I have a Yaesu FT1900 R/E in my vehicle, and I was wondering if it is possible to convert the extended receive to transmit on the 3 Motorola frequencies we use.

I inquired to one of our hams who owns a business radio supply shop
He mainly works on Kenwoods, and he said it would cot between $100 and $300 to get a mobile rig and program it to the frequencies I use at work

Thanks
KB1VIK
73s
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KA4LFP
Member

Posts: 66




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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2014, 05:59:00 PM »

I would imagine that your Yaesu FT1900 is not type accepted for transmitting on those frequencies, nor
would you have a license to use it on those frequencies...
Your employer has purchased a license 'attached' to the use of the commercial Motorolas you have.

Someone other than I can probably explain how that commercial licensing works to allow a non-licensed individual to use a commercial radio more clearly than I  just tried to explain ;-)


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KB1VIK
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2014, 01:44:42 AM »

thanks for the info
I figured as much
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W9GB
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Posts: 2656




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« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2014, 11:07:55 AM »

Doug -

Amateur Radio --> FCC Part 97
Land Mobile / Business / Gov't / First Responder Radio --> FCC Part 90

You can not take Part 97 designed radio (FT-1900) and use it for Part 90 service.
IF you need specific details why and specific equipment examples, ask.

Part 90 has gone Narrow banding as of January 1 and
many service users are going digital (P25 and other methods),
majority of amateur radio VHF/UHF equipment does neither.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2014, 11:10:45 AM by W9GB » Logged
WB2EOD
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Posts: 219




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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2014, 07:10:50 AM »

While it is perfectly OK to convert NON-AMATEUR equipment to AMATEUR use inverse is not true. 
I believe it is NOT legal to convert AMATEUR gear to NON-AMATEUR use. 

73
WB2EOD
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6055




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« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2014, 05:43:49 AM »

If you wanted to open up the receive portion of your ham radio, it isn't illegal.  It's when you transmit with the ham radio on business bands that you break the law.
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W9GB
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Posts: 2656




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« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2014, 09:36:11 AM »

Anyone that has taken a VHF/UHF FM transceiver into the InterMod Alleys to Chicago or New York will quickly tell you most of the current models "Don't Cut It".  
The current Kenwood TM-V71A FM transceiver opens up its squelch (RF Noise) every time I pass the automated weight stations, the LMR Part 90 Motorola and Kenwood -- QUIET.

Add the new Narrow Band spacing of channels of modern LMR allocations, and overflow of requests for channel pairs, the situation becomes problematic.

In the 1970s, you would find a few Japanese manufacturers that used Helical Front Ends (aka Part 90 style designs) on their 2-meter FM radios, such as the Icom IC-22A/22-S and Kenwood TM-7400.
These radios were more expensive ($$), but a frequent purchase for urban amateurs in that decade.
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K1DA
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Posts: 525




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« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2014, 09:59:48 AM »

A surplus Kenwoood TK series radio may do both for you if your "commercial" use still permits "wideband" FM.  The wideband vesions, which have een phased out of many VHF applications can be had at good prices.
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N7WR
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Posts: 45


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« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2014, 07:52:26 PM »

Actually there are some good deals on used Part 90 VHF radios that ARE capable of narrowband.  Many public agencies have received grants for new radios which must be not only narrowband but capable of digital (whether they want digital or not).  Agencies that have purchased same often sell or trade in their older radios which are narrow band (but not digital) capable.
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