Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?  (Read 64181 times)
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« on: February 08, 2014, 09:12:16 PM »

I have heard rumors of cycle peaks where 10 meters remains open all day and all night and therefore so crowded it seems like a big contest is going on.  Can anyone speak firsthand of that? Was that true in 1958?  1979? Judging from charts I have seen 1958 looks like it had the best potential.

I was first licensed in 1976, but unfortunately was not active during any cycle peaks prior to the present one...
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12974




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2014, 06:43:32 AM »

In 1958, 6 Meters was open almost every day. As a kid I had a folded dipole hung from the ceiling of my first-floor bed room in Michigan and I was copying stations in California many afternoons when I got home from school.
Logged
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2014, 08:42:08 AM »

In 1958, 6 Meters was open almost every day. As a kid I had a folded dipole hung from the ceiling of my first-floor bed room in Michigan and I was copying stations in California many afternoons when I got home from school.

wow, i have never worked 6 meters, but given that is almost twice as high in frequency as 10 meters -- and the fact that you were using an indoor first-floor antenna -- that is impressive!

It sounds like 1958 was the best cycle for hams in terms of muf openings. Can anyone confirm that 10 meters was open all day and all night long? If not firsthand -- what have you heard?
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 436




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 09:03:44 PM »

I have heard rumors of cycle peaks where 10 meters remains open all day and all night and therefore so crowded it seems like a big contest is going on.  Can anyone speak firsthand of that? Was that true in 1958?  1979? Judging from charts I have seen 1958 looks like it had the best potential.

I was first licensed in 1976, but unfortunately was not active during any cycle peaks prior to the present one...

Solar Cycle 19 (peaking in 1958) was the most active in recorded history.
See: http://www.ips.gov.au/Educational/2/3/1

I was first licensed in 1977, shortly after the start of Cycle 21 -- and that one was really good.

But Cycle 22 was even better.

And yes, at the peak of both of those the 20, 15 and 10 meter bands were active both night and day.

Sadly, it's been all down hill since then and if recent prognostications are correct, we're unlikely to see conditions like those again in my lifetime.  Embarrassed


73,
Mel - KS2G

 
Logged
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2014, 02:51:59 AM »

thanks for adding your experiences Mel!   i am beginning to think cycle 19 may not be equaled again for centuries...

I did find this: http://www.pulseontech.com/the-extraordinary-solar-cycle-19/ on what cycle 19 was like, but so far that is all.  Anyone else have any links to share?
Logged
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 603




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2014, 07:55:58 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F2_propagation

Notable F2 DX receptions

    In 1958, the FM broadcast radio DX record was set by DXer Gordon Simkin in southern California, United States, when he logged a 45 MHz commercial FM station from Korea via trans-Pacific F2 propagation at a distance of 5,000 miles (8,000 km).[citation needed]
   

In October 1979, Anthony Mann (Perth, Western Australia) received 48.25 MHz audio and 51.75 MHz video from the Holme Moss BBC channel B2 television transmitter. This F2 reception is a world record for reception from a BBC 405-line channel B2 transmitter.[1]
   

 During October to December 1979, United Kingdom DXers Roger Bunney (Hampshire), Hugh Cocks (Sussex), Mike Allmark (Leeds), and Ray Davies (Norwich) all received viewable television pictures from Australian channel TVQ 0 Brisbane (46.26 MHz) via multi-hop F2 propagation.[citation needed]
   

 On January 31, 1981, Todd Emslie, Sydney, Australia, received 41.5 MHz channel B1 television audio transmitted from Crystal Palace Transmitter by the BBC's television service, 10,560 miles (16,990 km) away. This BBC B1 reception was also recorded on to audio tape.[2]
Logged

Still using Windows XP Pro.
K9HKS
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2014, 04:01:05 PM »

I was licensed in 1957. The yrs of 1958, 1959, were the best for 10 meters.  Kept a regular 10 meter schedule with a friend in South Africa  on AM . Signals were always 59+ . In all my yrs of hamming I have not seen conditions like those days since.  Still enjoy hamming and been active all these yrs!
Logged
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2014, 04:54:54 PM »

I was licensed in 1957. The yrs of 1958, 1959, were the best for 10 meters.  Kept a regular 10 meter schedule with a friend in South Africa  on AM . Signals were always 59+ . In all my yrs of hamming I have not seen conditions like those days since.  Still enjoy hamming and been active all these yrs!


thanks, wow you got in at the right time  Cheesy

do you remember what time the band would close or if it would ever stay open all night?
Logged
WD4ELG
Member

Posts: 877




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2014, 05:33:00 PM »

I can tell you I was around for the 79 and 90 peaks, not active for the 2000.

I was in Central Calif in 1979 and I have logbooks of running JA stations during the CQ WW DX SSB contents on 10 meters in October of 1979 as late as 11 PM local time.  I had a low dipole and 100 watts.

Two things I had going for me:
1. I was within sight of the ocean about 3 miles away.  I was elevated above the ocean about 500 feet on a gradual slope.  PERFECT conditions for prop.
2. As an early teenager, my vocal chords were in that in-between stage and I was sometimes mistaken for a YL (the TS520S signal processer, although adding punch, did not help in this regard).

Logged
WD4ELG
Member

Posts: 877




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2014, 05:34:19 PM »

And in the fall of 1990, NE of Atlanta with the same rig and antenna (and a more masculine voice) I had good 10 meter prop to EU and VK at the same time to at least an hour after sunset.
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2578




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2014, 07:53:50 PM »

W8JI, on here, said he worked 10 meter DX 24 hours a day long ago.

Personally I remember hearing a strong Thailand station on 10 meters about 25 years ago who said it was 3:00 AM local time there.

I'm guessing ten WAS sometimes open 24 hours a day in tropical latitudes for better stations especially during major contests.  I became active around 1958, but staying up all night was hardly an option for an 8th grader.

Logged
N4VNV
Member

Posts: 179


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2014, 06:32:09 AM »

I don't remember the Solar Cycle number, but from 1972 thru 1980 were amazing years for me on 10M. I could talk to my ham friend in AZ from NC on 5 watts day or night. We had some real marathons. I was running a ground plane up 25 feet at the base. I had 100 watts, but didn't need over 5.
Logged
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 19, 2014, 02:55:54 AM »

I don't remember the Solar Cycle number, but from 1972 thru 1980 were amazing years for me on 10M. I could talk to my ham friend in AZ from NC on 5 watts day or night. We had some real marathons. I was running a ground plane up 25 feet at the base. I had 100 watts, but didn't need over 5.

 Huh  I got my novice in Fall 1976 and do not remember ever finding 10 meters open.  15 was open occasionally. I then went largely QRT from late 1977 till 2008.  A solar chart cycle i saw suggested both entry points (1976 and 2008) were not good ones in terms of muf propagation...
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 436




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 19, 2014, 07:26:01 AM »

I got my novice in Fall 1976 and do not remember ever finding 10 meters open.  15 was open occasionally. I then went largely QRT from late 1977 till 2008.  A solar chart cycle i saw suggested both entry points (1976 and 2008) were not good ones in terms of muf propagation...

You didn't stay around long enough the first time.
Cycle 21, peaked around 1980.

And the current Cycle 24 (just past its peak) has been well below that previous three.
Logged
W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1127




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2014, 10:53:41 AM »


You didn't stay around long enough the first time.
Cycle 21, peaked around 1980.

And the current Cycle 24 (just past its peak) has been well below that previous three.

 Roll Eyes Roll Eyes  tell me about it.  Cry a case could even be made that my re-entry *caused* the downturn  Grin Cheesy Wink Smiley




Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!