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Author Topic: HAM Radio IS Dead in Los Angeles  (Read 15483 times)
K6CPO
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Posts: 152




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« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2014, 12:30:13 PM »

Repeaters in San Diego are very active, some more than others, but most seem to be used regularly.  There is a very large retired community here and a lot of them are hams that are on the radio a good deal. The activity levels go up at this time of year as the snowbirds migrate south to escape the winter weather.
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1741




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« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2014, 02:35:09 PM »

In L.A., 147.435 MHz is almost never "dead." Wink

However, I wish it was. Tongue
   LOL!!!  Good point!  Same goes for 450.  Unfortunately, the entire world is now listening to those repeaters over the internet!!!   http://www.w6nut.com   http://ww.w6dek.com   http://www.my435.com
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K9MHZ
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Posts: 406




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« Reply #32 on: February 17, 2014, 04:15:40 PM »

Yep, 2 meters is quite the trailer park, Jerry Springer crowd  here in Indy as well.   
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KC7BYP
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Posts: 65


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« Reply #33 on: February 17, 2014, 09:37:15 PM »

Yes ham radio isn't dead. The tones are there to keep repeaters from causing QRM with each other.  And most of the repeaters around my QTH only have the tone to help weak stations get in. There is many diffrent things to do with ham radio.  Like I live in an apt.   Right now the only way I get on hf is via a prog from www.remotehams.com  this prog lets me control an other ham's remote base station in an other town via the internet.  See what I have posted about it on my blog   http://steveshamshack.com .  When I get good enough at flying remote control model helicopters I plain on buying a big gas powered r/c helicopter and fit it with a high scan tv camera and transmitter/ data transmitter that will transmit video and data (altitude and aprs coordinates) down to my laptop.  There are still digital cameras available at the hobby shop.  But as all of you know live video transmission can't be done without a license.   Also the last time I had to go to the VA main clinic
in Portland Oregon I forgot my TomTom navigator.  I had to get on the local repeater to get directions to get to a store I was going to.   One time I blew a tire out in the middle of nowere with no cell coverage and my spare tire was flat.  I was able to rase the local repeater and ham operator came out and gave me a hand.  He turned out to be the owner at the local tire shop.  So there you go. Ham radio isn't dead.

Steve kc7byp
Ham radio is a heck of a lot more than a repeater. On HF I hear stations active 24/7 so "ham radio" is not dead.


« Last Edit: February 17, 2014, 09:51:25 PM by KC7BYP » Logged

K8YS
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« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2014, 02:01:55 PM »

>> ... The repeater wasn't in the ARRL directory ...

ENTIRELY the club's fault, of course. If they do not submit their info to repeater guide editors, they cannot expect to get published.

The ARRL has made it painless for repeater owners to add their info to the ARRL Guide -

http://www.arrl.org/repeaters

... so there's really no excuse for a system that WANTS to be used NOT to be included!




Depends on the state coordinating committee. There was a time that the ARRL Repeater Directory would NOT acccept an entry unless it was placed by the state repeater coordinator.

I do not know if this is the current policy, but it was.
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KQ6Q
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Posts: 976




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« Reply #35 on: February 19, 2014, 01:09:25 AM »

Try the Catalina repeater on 2m - wide coverage San Diego to Santa Barbara, no PL tones used. That's your best bet for a random local contact, the rest of the repeaters are used by groups associated with them,and folks are at work, on the internet, etc.
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W6TLY
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #36 on: July 15, 2014, 07:05:25 PM »


FCC starts acting in Southern California repeater jamming cases

"I think what most of the people in this room agree with is that we need some enforcement in Southern California. Can we please get some enforcement here in Southern California!"

That was the plea of one Southern California ham made to Riley Hollingsworth when the FCC official spoke on the Queen Mary Ocean Liner attraction in Long Beach.  Now, less than two weeks later, Hollingsworth has acted by issuing two Los Angeles Area hams stern warning letters regarding alleged malicious interference to several area repeaters...

Maybe they've just learned to ignore people who abuse the repeater system.  You have a lot of guts complaining about repeaters after receiving a letter from the FCC telling you to stop your malicious jamming.



Well, if you'd do some more research you'd find out how this case really ended up.  Many repeaters were being "jammed" during this time, including public safety communications.  Only a short time after first being contacted by the FCC, "they" got to the bottom of it, and guess what?  It stopped.  After having several conversations with Mr. Hollingsworth about this subject, neither he nor the FCC was willing to present to me or the ARRL any of their evidence.

Here is where this and other QRM was coming from during this time:  http://hamsonline.proboards.com/thread/66

This issue has from time to time come up, but if you'll check with two of the largest and most active groups in Southern California (MRA - Mountain Repeater Assoc, a now defunct group, of which I was a long time member and good friend of the founder, K6VE, as well as many, many years with the PAPA System as a member and their lead web / media officer) I think you'll find that my operations have been and continue to be of the highest caliber.  The ability of a repeater owner to "think" he knows who is causing problems (yes, I did operate on the system in question at the time) and simply send a letter amazes me.  Again, never was I presented with any form of evidence.  I later spoke with Bill Pasternak (News Line) and he published, on an episode of News Line, a bit of "my side of the story".  You seem to be handy with a web search, I'm sure you can find it.

73 OM.
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KM4AH
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Posts: 89




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« Reply #37 on: July 15, 2014, 07:52:17 PM »

There are two many repeaters period. If you got rid of 75% of them and did away with the tones you might actually get some activity. Was in the 70's anyway.
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W6TLY
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #38 on: July 16, 2014, 08:01:51 AM »

There are two many repeaters period. If you got rid of 75% of them and did away with the tones you might actually get some activity. Was in the 70's anyway.

Agreed, here in Los Angeles / SoCal anyway.  I'm the OP on this thread and I'm standing by what I originally said.  HAM radio, at least repeater activity, is about dead in SoCal, at least it is relative to what it was only 20 years ago or less.  Repeaterbook.com (http://www.repeaterbook.com/repeaters/index.php?state_id=06#sthash.3afiOtkX.dpbs) says there are 2,300 repeaters in California. Twenty three thousand!

Two of the highest level machines, Mt. Wilson and Mt. Disappointment used to be be active all the time, they were machines where you actually had to "break" if you needed to make a call.  Now, there literally are 3 QSO in a 24 hrs period.  In the AM on the Mt. Wilson box, there is an informal "net" of OM's that have been meeting on the air for decades.  Other than that, you might hear one other call a day.

The other problem, and its been talked about here on eHam and other boards, are private or closed systems.  I don't know how it is in other states / cities, but in SoCal at least 50% of the spectrum set aside for repeater use (144 - 1.2) is marked as private or closed.  The funny thing is, plug any of these freq's into your VFO and listen for a day, you'll nearly always hear even less chatter than the already dead "open" repeaters.  I realize it is very expensive to build and maintain a stand alone repeater, and a linked system exponentially are even more so, but... But, if equipment is sitting on a hill top doing nothing, then what is the point?  I'm not sure what the answer is to get more activity on repeaters in general, but for private systems, if they need to make some $, so help support the equipment, they need to entice users to "use" the equipment.  They need to welcome ALL HAM's to at least try their repeater(s).  Who knows, maybe some would become paying users.

Amateurs are an finicky bunch, as you know if you've been a HAM for very long. We talk about disaster communications, how we want to help, about the contacts we've made and the new friends we've met on the air, but ID on a closed system (in SoCal anyway) and most of the time you'll hear nothing, because no one else is using it, or you'll be instantly reminded that "this is a closed system".

HAM radio is  already dieing, and we're only adding nails to the coffin.
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W6TLY
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #39 on: July 16, 2014, 08:06:47 AM »

>> ... dead in L.A. ...

Repeater conversations and "personalities" are like about any other "club" environment. You need to visit a few
until you find one that fits YOU well.

I post a little list of 80 or so systems in and around Southern CA that I have found to be welcoming of new users - from
new licensees to us jaded oldsters. Try a few of the systems here ...

http://k6lcs.com/k6lcs/Docs.html

Clint K6LCS
909-241-7666 - cell

Clint - Thank you for this list!
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W4KYR
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Posts: 542




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« Reply #40 on: July 16, 2014, 08:29:46 AM »

Are all the 440 repeaters still private and closed in Southern California? This is what I heard from a fellow ham who visited there in the 1990's.
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Still using Windows XP Pro.
K8AXW
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Posts: 3837




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« Reply #41 on: July 16, 2014, 09:33:51 AM »

Quote
.yea, well I was running 1200w PEP into my 50 element yagi up 300 feet using 9913 and type N connectors, plus a pre-amp and gold plated cavities, and carbon fiber spreaders and was only getting an SWR of 1:1.2, my rotater was really spinning once I put some marine grease on the bearings, and then when I coupled my home-brew co-phase loop into the flux capacitor and keyed down, you should have seen the neighbors cat jump

And you expect to hear......WHAT? 
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K6CPO
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Posts: 152




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« Reply #42 on: July 16, 2014, 11:42:05 AM »

Are all the 440 repeaters still private and closed in Southern California? This is what I heard from a fellow ham who visited there in the 1990's.

No...

In San Diego we have a number of "open" 440 repeaters, including one that covers all the way up into Orange County.
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NO2A
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Posts: 784




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« Reply #43 on: July 16, 2014, 12:49:52 PM »

I think one thing that`s killed repeaters is the attitude heard on many of them. Unlike hf,for the most part,repeaters attract an unfriendly environment. How many times have you thrown out your call,only to hear a,"kerchunk" but no reply. Or you`ve heard a group talking to each other,so you announce your prescence. Nobody answers,you`re not allowed to talk with them because they don`t "know you personally."How does this make a new or old ham feel? Or maybe you needed an audio check,and some wise guy says,"Your crappy radio sounds like s**t." You get the point. Or the ones out in CA,where you hear,"I`m getting high and watching tv,what are we doing tonight guys?"By contrast,last night on 40m I was invited to join a roundtable on ssb with a very nice crowd. Why can`t repeaters be like that? I dunno,but many times I`ve thought about yanking my 2m/440 rig out of my car and selling it.(or just plain running it over,along with my ht`s.)No joke.
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KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 359




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« Reply #44 on: July 16, 2014, 01:03:58 PM »

I think one thing that`s killed repeaters is the attitude heard on many of them. Unlike hf,for the most part,repeaters attract an unfriendly environment. How many times have you thrown out your call,only to hear a,"kerchunk" but no reply. Or you`ve heard a group talking to each other,so you announce your prescence. Nobody answers,you`re not allowed to talk with them because they don`t "know you personally."How does this make a new or old ham feel? Or maybe you needed an audio check,and some wise guy says,"Your crappy radio sounds like s**t." You get the point. Or the ones out in CA,where you hear,"I`m getting high and watching tv,what are we doing tonight guys?"By contrast,last night on 40m I was invited to join a roundtable on ssb with a very nice crowd. Why can`t repeaters be like that? I dunno,but many times I`ve thought about yanking my 2m/440 rig out of my car and selling it.(or just plain running it over,along with my ht`s.)No joke.

I decided not to get a 144/440 rig for my car because it would be a waste of money. I already have two Baofengs, and never use them. I keep one charged for EmComm use, but other than that I don't use them. CA has a lot of people getting high, that's for sure, weed and meth addicts.
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