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Author Topic: Where is AM activity  (Read 16518 times)
ONAIR
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Posts: 1747




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« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2014, 05:11:44 PM »

AM is great!  One can have lots of fun converting an old CB radio to 10 Meters.
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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2014, 09:35:04 AM »

AM belongs in the days of the past. But a old Johnson would be just fine for CW.   Lips sealed
Yes indeed AM is a very proud component of our amateur radio heritage .AM is still a vibrant and popular mode . AM is used by vintage radio gear as well as the newest appliances .   Many operators find it far more enjoyable than some of the other phone modes .
Modern Class D AM rigs are extremely efficient with complete 1500 watt transmitters able to fit into a cigar box sized cabinet . They sound great as well , far easier on the ears over the long run than most slop-bucket appliances .  AM is an ideal mode for the hands on radio man interested in actually building and working on his own equipment rather than plugging a mike and antenna into the yaekencom .

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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 139




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« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2014, 02:58:32 PM »

You cannot beat the sound of HAMs transmitting in AM, especially when you're receiving it on a tube boatanchor. This is W6THW in AM mode on 3875kHz, and IMHO, his station sounds better than most MW BCs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BubLkbuxls
« Last Edit: April 02, 2014, 03:09:03 PM by HFCRUSR » Logged
VE3LYX
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Posts: 160




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« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2014, 03:01:37 PM »

For sure. Well said.  This week since Monday I designed built and finished a single tube AM rig using a 6l6. Initial testing is looking good. It is loop modulated , something I have been experimenting with since Christmas. I was surprised to have it up and going by today but I ran out of things to do and it was done. Hope to test it on 40m perhaps this weekend.
Have another 1 tuber AM rig which has been quite successful. 8 AM rigs all told. My main AM rig is a DX60B. Not for everyone but a very enjoyable side of our hobby.
don  
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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2014, 11:37:48 AM »

The "AM Windows" have been imaginary for years.  Why would you limit yourself to some very small sliver of frequency range when you can operate AM wherever phone is allowed (obviously depending on your license class). It's just plain silly to define an imaginary 10 or 20 KHz range and try to have four or five different AM QSO's going on at the same time. On 75 and 40 meters, this AM scenario happens all the time. Use that big tuning knob and find an empty frequency somewhere in the phone band and call CQ (if you know how to do that). You might also entice some SSB operator to press the AM button on their transceiver and give you a call. There are several documented (depending on who is writing them) "AM Calling Frequencies" (1885, 3885, 7290, 14.286, 50.4). I'll leave you to define "Calling Frequency". None of this is rocket science.

Pete, wa2cwa
 

"Why would you limit yourself to some very small sliver of frequency range when you can operate AM wherever phone is allowed"

I take it that the line quoted above is actually a question , absent of course a question mark . Huh

  Like it or not , there are areas in each band where AM activity takes place more regularly than others . Listening or calling in those band segments is more likely to result in a friendly contact than some other areas within that band . Hence the question "Where is AM activity" .

   The fact we may engage in AM operation in the phone segments of most bands is well understood .  Long before the phone portions of our US bands were extended , I checked in to numerous Canadian phone nets using CW and was always greeted by a very friendly response . Try checking in to a slop-bucket net on 75 today with CW and you get responses like "What the heck is that beep beep ?" .
  I suspect well over 99.999% of all ham radio operators know how to call CQ , no magic there . Huh
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WA2CWA
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Posts: 312


WWW

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« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2014, 01:01:03 PM »

"Why would you limit yourself to some very small sliver of frequency range when you can operate AM wherever phone is allowed"

I take it that the line quoted above is actually a question , absent of course a question mark . Huh

writer's license: I posed it as a statement  Smiley

Quote
Like it or not , there are areas in each band where AM activity takes place more regularly than others . Listening or calling in those band segments is more likely to result in a friendly contact than some other areas within that band . Hence the question "Where is AM activity" .

When operating on AM, I can find friendly contacts all over the bands not just in some imaginary window.

Quote
I suspect well over 99.999% of all ham radio operators know how to call CQ , no magic there . Huh

If that number were really true, most of them must be in denial in using the activity.

Pete, wa2cwa
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VE3LYX
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Posts: 160




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« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2014, 02:51:58 PM »

I stick to the "imaginary" windows out of respect for others. If a spot is definitely not occupied and the band is clear I may do a test for a minute or so with another ham. There is a lot of animosity between some SSBer and AMers. Why, I don't know but there is. Adding fuel to the fire helps no one. Making a reasonable effort to keep to the traditional spots doesn't cause me any pain and I operate AM probably everyday. I also don't venture into the traditional CW bands on Phone of any kind either although legally here I can. It is called R E S P E C T for others and doesn't cost a dime. The AM windows are not that crowded that it is a problem. If a SSBer (and I also work a lot of that) is offended if I operate AM in the traditional AM window then he is looking for trouble and nothing more but if I am down in his normal territory operating there just because I can and it is legal I am looking for trouble perhaps. One because there will likely be no one there running AM (And no, he wont push that button) so it is really foolish for me to be there and two because he and his pals may have been gathering there for years and now I am disrupting that for no good reason. That is why I try to stick to the traditional spots for AM
don 
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KI6LZ
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Posts: 602




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« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2014, 03:34:46 PM »

I was first licensed in 1968 and heard about the vicious wars between the AMers and SSBer mostly over the large bandwidth carrier interference. Maybe some from that time period could expound.

Have also heard may argue with the wide band extended SSB (ESSB) stations recently. Some taking up 6 kHz on a crowed band.

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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2014, 03:35:58 AM »

"Why would you limit yourself to some very small sliver of frequency range when you can operate AM wherever phone is allowed"
I take it that the line quoted above is actually a question , absent of course a question mark . Huh
writer's license: I posed it as a statement  Smiley
Quote
Like it or not , there are areas in each band where AM activity takes place more regularly than others . Listening or calling in those band segments is more likely to result in a friendly contact than some other areas within that band . Hence the question "Where is AM activity" .
When operating on AM, I can find friendly contacts all over the bands not just in some imaginary window.
Quote
I suspect well over 99.999% of all ham radio operators know how to call CQ , no magic there . Huh
If that number were really true, most of them must be in denial in using the activity.
Pete, wa2cwa

Writer's license is pretty lame at best .  Wink The line started out with "Why" and was composed as a question . If you posed a statement , the sentence should be composed as a statement . Spell check will not catch those errors it is up to the writer .

  You are far from unique regarding finding QSOs across the band , we all do that . At any given time however , the AM calling freqs are still the most likely place to find AM activity , even if you just want to listen .
Knowing how to call CQ is one thing , however some folks may chose to seek a QSO by other means . Choosing not to call CQ is by no means an indication the operator doesn't know how , no need to imply otherwise .


 DON ,

   There is more to the whole AM vs SSB subject than simple bandwidth issues . Those who work a lot of AM actually find that a nearby SSB QSO often generates more QRM than they receive .
This is due in large part to the relative power in the sideband . The bulk of the power in an AM signal is smack on the frequency in the form of a carrier . Carrier induced hetrodynes are simply notched out by most operators .
 The SSB station puts his full power into the sibeband .  Many of the AM operators are running 100 watts or less . I have spent a lot of time listening on both sides of adjacent SSB/AM activity and more often than not , the AMer is getting more QRM than he is delivering .  Monitor your modulation , run clean and try not to use any more power than needed . We can coexist nicely with the respect as you mention .
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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2014, 04:41:49 AM »

Correction:
"however some folks may chose"
Should read "however some folks may choose" .
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W5RKL
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Posts: 897




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« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2014, 02:31:52 PM »

AM is great!  One can have lots of fun converting an old CB radio to 10 Meters.

Yep it is.

You don't need a lot of power to work stations on 10 meter AM so turn the linear amp OFF. I operate 2 converted 11 meter Johnson Messenger transceivers, one is a Messenger One (White Face) that is crystal controlled on 4 10 meter frequencies with a carrier output power of 7 watts and the other is a VFO controlled Johnson Messenger 223, the VFO is a N3ZI DDS2 VFO, with a carrier output power of 5 watts. I've worked both coast, Canada, and Italy with the Johnson Messenger 223. The antenna I use is a simple 10 meter inverted vee up 20 feet at the center.

It doesn't take much to convert one of these older 11 meter tube transceivers from 11 meter to 10 meters. Once the crystals are in hand it takes about 30 minutes. A lot of people tend to lean towards converting the sideband transceivers. Those are a bit more complicated to convert. If I want to operate sideband on 10 meters I'll use my Heathkit SB-100 or my Yaesu FT-757GX or FT-857D.

73
Mike W5RKL
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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2014, 03:14:04 PM »

I was talking with a fellow last week who was using a converted Johnson Messenger on 75 meters . Sounded great too !

 On the other hand , it seems there are more ham transmitters winding up on 11 meters than vise versa  . Roll Eyes
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GW3OQK
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Posts: 157




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« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2014, 12:43:22 AM »

Serious AM operators do not use a PTT mic. They have a tx/rx toggle switch to ease the strain while they sit back, relax, and deliver their monologue.

Quote
Keep your transmission length within reason. The AM windows are small and time is short. Many a time I have had to quit before my turn in when someone spent 35 or 40 minutes describing how they made dinner. Probably 5 minutes would be a good rule of thumb. That way everyone gets a turn.   And be careful AM is addictive!
don

Wouldn't 1 minute be sufficient?
Andrew
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KG8LB
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Posts: 243




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« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2014, 02:40:30 PM »

Actually some of us AM ops do not use a push to talk "button" or switch per-se . My favorite system is to bring the transmit control relay wires right out of the operating bench side by side. I get an old American Beauty 150 watt soldering iron heated up . When my turn to transmit comes around I just grab the iron and solder the wires together . If I plan on talking a while I may choose to unplug the iron to save electricity , there will be plenty of time to warm it up when I contemplate turning it over to the next AMer . The slop-bucket ops seem to have attention deficit disorder and only talk for a few seconds at a time .

  I am usually thankful for that .
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KI6LZ
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Posts: 602




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« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2014, 02:47:09 PM »

Love it.  Smiley   The solder push to talk is best idea yet and apropos to AM operation.
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