Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What is involved with adding QSK to Amp  (Read 542 times)
NORTHCOUNTRY
Member

Posts: 358




Ignore
« on: November 29, 2006, 05:56:49 AM »

What is involved with adding QSK to Amp. I know Ameritron has a option for this but has anyone fabricated their own qsk mod?  (specifically I am asking in regards to Ameritron Amps.)
Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9880


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2006, 06:08:52 AM »

Why? The MFJ QSK-5, or the internal one they sell, probably can't be duplicated for less money, unless you are very frugal. Even then you'd have to design one. Further, unless you do a LOT of CW, including round tables, save your money.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
Logged

NORTHCOUNTRY
Member

Posts: 358




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2006, 07:02:41 AM »

Ok, two more questions then,

I am not sure I fully understand the ramifications of QSK with an amp, at 20 wpm would my code be distorted without qsk?

I currently operate with what is considered semi-breakin (transeaver drops to receive audio between words) I am happy with that sequence, does that mean I should just forget about qsk?
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20613




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2006, 08:27:34 AM »

I would recommend forgetting about it for now.

QSK used with very fast (or no) receiver AGC will allow you to hear received signals between dots and dashes of high speed CW.  For traffic handling, contesting or high speed ragchewing between very experienced and skilled operators, this can be an advantage.  For general operating, it's just about no advantage at all and in fact it detracts from the operating experience for many, if not most.

I make 100-150 CW contacts a week on average and don't ever use QSK.

Like most, I do use "semi" break-in, which only means the rig takes care of T-R functions by sending code with my keyer, without additional intervention to throw switches.  I set the "drop out" time to be about 3-4 characters long, depending upon my operating speed, so the T-R relays in the rig and amplifier aren't constantly switching...they just drop out (switch from TX to RX) if I take a fairly long pause, such as would occur when I'm "finished" sending a transmission and want to return the QSO to the other station.

No optional accessories are required for that.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
NORTHCOUNTRY
Member

Posts: 358




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2006, 09:31:02 AM »

Thanks for the response.  I just want to make real sure, that I getting what I want.
Logged
AD5X
Member

Posts: 1432




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2006, 09:49:27 AM »

I operate CW almost exclusively, and I also prefer semi break-in.  Much less distracting.  Sometimes I do operate QSK when chasing DX.  If I do need my ampifier though (Ameritron ALS-600), I drop back to semi break-in.

Phil - AD5X
Logged
W4PM
Member

Posts: 11




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2006, 03:48:34 PM »

This doesn't address the original question but is directerd more to why QSK? I think the original responer covered the original question.  I may well look into a QSK-5.  I just wish they were a bit less expensive.  

If you do CW contesting QSK is a very valuable feature to have on an amp as I've found out lately in the CQWW DX and the ARRL 160M contests.  I just added an ALS-600 amp to my Ten Tec station. I was use to QSK when operating without an amp in previous contests.  Now without QSK, when you have a run going and you have even a one or two character delay in your switching you miss all or part of the first character of a responding station.  Was that an M or a W or a K or an N or an A or what?  I can shorten up the delay but that gives a lot of audible relay clicking in and out.  That's not a good substitute for smooth QSK operation.  

Of course, I agree that in normal rag chew operation and/or slow speed CW QSK is not normally necessary most of the time and can even be distracting. QSK can be quite helpful though if the other station just got a phone call and can't break you to let you know to stand by a minute or two.  Otherwise you continue your monolog unaware and he has missed all of that extremely important stuff you just sent him while he was talking on the land line!  
Logged
W7VP
Member

Posts: 26




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2007, 07:35:02 AM »

I have two amplifiers: a 4-1000A and an AL-800.  I use the Ameritron external QSK switch for both ragchewing and contesting without trouble.  The ususal speeds on ragchewing are about 27 wpm with contesting quite a bit higher.

Before the Amieritron I had built a vacuum relay switch thaat worked fine except that the relays would require replacement from time to time.  Thus the purchase of the Ameritorn which uses PIN diodes. It is reallly nice for the ragchewing I do with mny cw friends who can always break in whle I am sending.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!