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Author Topic: What is a Boat Anchor?  (Read 20645 times)
KE0ZU
Member

Posts: 41




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« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2014, 02:21:05 AM »

My general definition is, made in the country you live in, metal chassis front panel and cabinet, tubes, and as mentioned earlier, a mechanical control for every function.
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 406




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« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2014, 07:49:46 AM »

I think that's it, ZU. 
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VE3LYX
Member

Posts: 141




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« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2014, 09:51:00 AM »

   Then again , the fellow who owns a 1929 Bantam Roadster or 1938 Morgan 3 wheeler or  even a 1930 Bugatti is not planning on outrunning a 2014 Ford Mustang ...but his car is and will be far more valuable for many years to come . Wink
It isn't always about pure performance . The experience has it's own appeal and value . If we could only operate the newer appliances or SDR , I would walk away from ham radio instantly . The new stuff has zero appeal to some of us .
[/quote]
I didn't think anyone else understood. Well put. I have a pair of ARC5s on Am and CW, A TNT 1929 style (on AM even) and a bunch of homebrew 1930s style rigs (CW and AM) I don't expect them to work like a modern rig and get ticked off when some self appointed expert mentions Pinched off audio or non broadcast audio. I don't think an ARC5 was intended to have broadcast quality audio  and recently discovered the main promoter of it does a lot of broadcasting and very little listening anyway.(his shortest transmission this week was 37 minutes) I also have a TS830S which I have had since new when I want something a bit more modern. Wouldn't trade it out either.
I  drive a 63 Dodge 426 MW with no PS or AC etc for fun. Also have a slant six dragster (remember the slant sixes?) which I take out twice a year to give these old bones just one more adrenalin rush while I still can. But if I need to go to town the 2009 Dodge Journey is what I drive. Same concept exactly. Your post just reinforced that. Thanks
don
« Last Edit: March 19, 2014, 09:56:57 AM by VE3LYX » Logged
N8NSN
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Posts: 283


WWW

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« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2014, 10:11:04 AM »

Boat Anchor = Tubes  I.E. Iron, Glass, & Class
Heavy or Big Iron = Broadcast Transmitters of tube era.
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KI6LZ
Member

Posts: 586




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« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2014, 10:18:05 AM »

Some radio that should have been thrown into the ocean but for some reason was kept by those that like them. Very limited, and getting less limited group that still keeps them running for some reason.

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N8NSN
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Posts: 283


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« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2014, 07:04:52 PM »

Some radio that should have been thrown into the ocean but for some reason was kept by those that like them. Very limited, and getting less limited group that still keeps them running for some reason.



Obviously someone whom, "just doesn't get it". Has to imply insults to perhaps provide the illusion that profound thought abounds within the "limited" intellect in true possession.

For this person I have only one statement...

That is:

Let us all know how well the "plastic radio, loaded with proprietary parts", bought recently is s
serving anyone - 50 or 60 years from now.

Boat anchor is truly a poor term for a well maintained, still quite antiquate, though certainly "high energy consuming" masterpiece.

Just enjoy what ever facet of the hobby you wish to enjoy and discount the rhetoric from those who enjoy insulting others whom enjoy the hobby differently than themselves.

. .
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KI6LZ
Member

Posts: 586




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« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2014, 08:11:51 PM »

To me a Boat Anchor is a junky heavy poorly designed radio as opposed to a classic, vintage, or historical radio. Obviously someone used the nomenclature Boat Anchor in jest. My do some get touchy.
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 406




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« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2014, 08:05:57 AM »

Yes they do.  The really entertaining part is his trying to sound pretentious while totally screwing up the use of the word "whom."   

Full disclosure.....I've owned many boat anchors over the years.  Size, lack of capability, deaf receivers with no selectivity, etc......takes away the "magic" of it, and they become just old, PITA junk before you know it.     
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KG6AF
Member

Posts: 356




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« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2014, 08:48:55 AM »

Back in the early 1970's, a ham told me about a frustrating experience with a piece of WWII surplus radio equipment he'd acquired.  Try as he might, he couldn't find any information about how to convert it for use on the amateur radio bands.  Surplus equipment was plentiful at the time, and one of the ham radio magazines--I don't remember which one--published a series of books on how to modify various types of equipment.  My friend finally stumbled across an index for these books, and found one that claimed to show how to convert his radio for civilian use.  Elated, he ordered it.

A few weeks later, when the book arrived in the mail, he quickly thumbed through it to find the article on his radio.  To his disappointment, he found not an article, but a series of photos: (a) a rope is tied around the radio, (b) the radio is hefted over the side of a boat, and (c) the radio is lowered into the water.

That's a boat anchor.
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 406




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« Reply #24 on: March 20, 2014, 12:35:12 PM »

Great story!

 Grin
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2014, 01:55:30 PM »

To me, a boat anchor is a heavy radio, period.  It usually includes any radio, historic, vintage, classic--or total junker--that has a lot of weight due to a heavy steel chassis, transformers, tubes, built-in power supplies, etc. 

When the radios started being built solid state, a lot of the weight got lost somewhere--gradually--but still lost.  Once the steel and the heavy components went out of radios, they stopped being called boat anchors--simply because the weight was no longer there.

I've a Yaesu FT101-EE which was the beginning of solid state construction.  The transmitter, however, still used tubes for its finals, and the radio has a built in power supply.  It's still weighty--and what I'd consider a boat anchor--even if some hams would disagree with me.
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K9MHZ
Member

Posts: 406




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« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2014, 03:46:53 AM »

I've a Yaesu FT101-EE

That is a nice one, along with the Kenwoods of the same era.   Still got the load and tune fix while having some better receive capabilities.  Both manufacturers did a nice job in building those heavy and solid.
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KA5ROW
Member

Posts: 500


WWW

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« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2014, 04:14:22 PM »

Boat anchor rigs would fall in the range of the 1960's and earlier. Tube type a must, by law.

From the ROW dictionary the Drake 4 series would have been it for them. The TS-520 Kenwood is there last.

The hybrids just don't quite make it to the boat anchors. But are fine transitional
 rigs. No new boat anchors have been made sense. Sorry but that IC-7800 or the new Kenwood TS-990 will never be a boat anchor, ( Even ) 50 years from now the real classic rigs will shock and awe anyone. But any modern rig of today will just be an old radio even if it never left the box it came in.
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KG8LB
Member

Posts: 237




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« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2014, 02:55:34 PM »

  Then again , the fellow who owns a 1929 Bantam Roadster or 1938 Morgan 3 wheeler or  even a 1930 Bugatti is not planning on outrunning a 2014 Ford Mustang ...but his car is and will be far more valuable for many years to come . Wink
It isn't always about pure performance . The experience has it's own appeal and value . If we could only operate the newer appliances or SDR , I would walk away from ham radio instantly . The new stuff has zero appeal to some of us .
I didn't think anyone else understood. Well put. I have a pair of ARC5s on Am and CW, A TNT 1929 style (on AM even) and a bunch of homebrew 1930s style rigs (CW and AM) I don't expect them to work like a modern rig and get ticked off when some self appointed expert mentions Pinched off audio or non broadcast audio. I don't think an ARC5 was intended to have broadcast quality audio  and recently discovered the main promoter of it does a lot of broadcasting and very little listening anyway.(his shortest transmission this week was 37 minutes) I also have a TS830S which I have had since new when I want something a bit more modern. Wouldn't trade it out either.
I  drive a 63 Dodge 426 MW with no PS or AC etc for fun. Also have a slant six dragster (remember the slant sixes?) which I take out twice a year to give these old bones just one more adrenalin rush while I still can. But if I need to go to town the 2009 Dodge Journey is what I drive. Same concept exactly. Your post just reinforced that. Thanks
don
[/quote]

   The attribution was missing in the quote line by I thought the lines were familiar !

  Yes indeed we agree . Funny how the people who feign a dislike of vintage gear feel the need to bash the radios and those who appreciate them and derive great satisfaction owning , restoring and operating them . 

  Different people enjoy different aspects of the hobby . 
 It may be the band , the mode , the equipment or even how we attend the Dayton Hamvention that seems to bother them . My pleasure is their distraction .... Cool  Grin

 Don , you are most welcome .

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WA2EHV
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2014, 06:53:58 PM »

To me, "boat anchor" always sounded negative.  I run a homebrew rockbound 6C5-6L6 with a Drake 2B, and that humble setup has given me 4 DX and 29 states. 
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