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Author Topic: Powerwerx Zip cord amp rating?  (Read 1502 times)
K5UNX
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« on: February 28, 2014, 12:21:48 PM »

I am getting things together to put my FT857D and things in a box to make my station portable for field day, and other things.

I read where the 30A connectors are good for 12-14 ga wire while the 45A connectors are good for 10 ga wire.   I thought I saw a table somewhere indicating what wire size for what amp loading I should use . . . . Anyone recall see something like this? I thought I saw a table somewhere with zip cord size and amp capacity???

Or is it safe to assume that the 12-14 ga wire will be good for 30A since it's what is recommended for the 30A connectors???
« Last Edit: February 28, 2014, 12:24:15 PM by K5UNX » Logged

N7BMW
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2014, 01:02:00 PM »

Here is a link to a voltage/current wire size tables.  Scroll down for 12 volt.  These tables are for one way - you have to double the length for accurate info. 

http://www.solar-electric.com/wire-loss-tables.html
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AA4PB
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 01:28:40 PM »

It depends. There are two issues. One is heating of the wire and the other is the total voltage drop in the wire (down and back). The following page (at the bottom) includes a calculator that will give you the voltage drop in various length runs at different currents.
   http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

For a 10 foot length (that's 20 foot down and back) of copper wire you will get the following voltage drops at 20A:
#14 = 1.037V
#12 = 0.653V
#10 = 0.411V

If the radio draws 20A peak and works down to 11.5V and you want to operate from your battery until its down to about 12V then you need to use #10 wire if you have a 10-foot length of cable. That'll provide 11.589 V at the radio when the battery voltage is down to 12V.

If you were to use #14 then in order to maintain 11.5V at the radio the battery voltage would have to be maintained at or above 12.537V.
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K5UNX
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2014, 04:52:31 PM »

That's good information. Thanks!

I am putting a radio, tuner, SignalLink, in a box. I am also putting a PowerWerx 30A power supply in there I think. This is my main station as well as a portable station for Field Day, JOTA and other things away from the house. I might add a dual band mobile radio in the future but it won't go in at first since I don't have one yet. I do have a dual band HT that I will also want to charge as needed.  I'll add up the loads to make sure I am within the power supply capabilities but I think I'll be OK.

I'll make the cables in the box as short as I can, leaving some reasonable slack. When I add a battery of some sort and a solar panel, in the future, I'll make sure I have a large enough cable to accommodate the voltage drop and min radio voltage etc. I figured the answer would not be as easy as I thought.

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