Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ARRL  (Read 6272 times)
WI8P
Member

Posts: 260




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2014, 08:56:36 AM »


But I digress.  IMHO, anyone who says they won't join ARRL is really saying they don't care about the future of ham radio, or it's survivability.


Oh god you're one of that crowd, the "If you're not with us you must be against us" muppets. Just because they're not in the ARRL doesn't mean they don't care. They may not agree with what the ARRL does. They may do more for amateur radio than you've ever done. Paying your annual dues to a club doesn't show you care about amateur radio more than other people do.

According to your QRZ profile you care so much about amateur radio you won't even QSL.


And it's pretty easy to see what crowd you're with - "My way or the highway".  What other organization stands up for US hams? 

People do more than I do?  Wow, that's great. Do they lobby congress and the FCC? Do they put their money where their mouth is?         
Logged
K6CPO
Member

Posts: 157




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2014, 11:05:49 AM »

If it hadn't been for the original founders of the ARRL, there would be no ham radio in the US at all.  After WW 1, the US Navy wanted to take over control of all radio in the United States, essentially doing what the FCC does today.  One of the things the Navy wanted to do was eliminate amateur use of radio entirely.  Hiram Percy Maxim and Clarence Tuska rallied amateurs and the legislation that wold have given the Navy control over radio was defeated.
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1771




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2014, 11:55:52 AM »

Re: K6CPO

Any thoughts on how the Navy would have prevented the thousands of young folks at the time from experimenting and using the then newly emerging communication technology? Being a Navy man myself I will admit that the Navy would probably had more success than the FCC has today.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4719




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2014, 12:03:03 PM »

The  more members that a national society has, the more clout it has overall. When the IARU member societies can show that they represent more members, they get listened to at ITU - which is one place where it matters. It's also important that the IARU representatives are technically competent - so even when a non-amateur matter comes up, they can contribute. That often means in technical discussion, the Chair can ask 'Do the IARU have an opinion?' Then IARU can comment and when asked their qualification,  can respond 'Mr Chairman, although I am here representing the IARU and can only speak on behalf of IARU, with another hat on, I am Chairman of XYZ international committee or whatever'. And that is why the IARU are so well regarded at ITU for their technical ability. But without the support of ARRL for IARU and representation at ITU, gaining such influence would be far more difficult.




Logged
K6CPO
Member

Posts: 157




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2014, 02:24:47 PM »

Re: K6CPO

Any thoughts on how the Navy would have prevented the thousands of young folks at the time from experimenting and using the then newly emerging communication technology? Being a Navy man myself I will admit that the Navy would probably had more success than the FCC has today.

Not really...  Being a retired Navy man myself, I imagine they would have had more enforcement clout in 1918 than the FCC has today.  Imagine armed Shore Patrol showing up at your house because you had an illegal transmitter...
Logged
KC9YTJ
Member

Posts: 77




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2014, 02:57:08 PM »

Not really...  Being a retired Navy man myself, I imagine they would have had more enforcement clout in 1918 than the FCC has today.  Imagine armed Shore Patrol showing up at your house because you had an illegal transmitter...

...and telling you, "Hey, kid.  You wanna play with radio?  Join the Navy."

Seriously -- remember, they'd already shut it down for the duration of the war, and compared to today's numbers, there just weren't that many amateurs to begin with.  I'm guessing that, if they'd kept it shut down, pre-war amateurs would have grumbled a bit, and joined the service or gotten a job with a local radio broadcaster if they wanted to play with radio.  Or just stopped playing with radio if neither of those options interested them.

Americans, by and large, are law-abiding.  If the law had said "no amateur radio" and nobody had been able to organize sufficient opposition to that idea to get it overturned in the near-century since 1918, we simply wouldn't have the hobby today.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4719




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2014, 12:43:29 AM »

If the Navy had kept control, it might have taken a much longer time for the broadcast industry to get started, too.

In the end, it was lucky for both the Army and Navy that there was a sizeable amateur community and manufacturing base for it after December 1941.....
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3900




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2014, 07:36:14 AM »

RZP:  Peter, the really strange thing and the seemingly American thing is that after the existing amateur community made such a great contribution to the WWI efforts, the Navy still wanted to eliminate amateur radio.

No doubt the government would have eventually wrested control from the Navy and created what we now know as the FCC but who knows how many years it would have taken.

There would have been experimentation and bootleg operation for sure but there wouldn't have been any organization or solidification of this group of experimenters or bootleg operators.  The contributions made by amateurs would have been much less. 
Logged
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2014, 11:37:11 AM »

Reading QST since my Novice days 48 years ago has very greatly expanded my knowledge and enjoyment of radio.

Neil N3DF
Logged

Neil N3DF
KI6LZ
Member

Posts: 587




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2014, 12:28:32 PM »

If not QST what other magazines does one read to stay informed on radio news, products, events, issues ? I've had good service and in general feel that ARRL does a good job in representing  the hobby. I have some nits but not any that would cause me to not support them. I also subscribe to CQ, hope they don't go belly up.

What does puzzle me at times are those that are in this hobby and don't keep up with its development and activities. Heck I run into lots who don't even know what contest is on which could disrupt their activity. By simply looking at the calendar one can easily QSY to the WARC bands or plan another activity.

Others don't know what a SteppIR is. Go figure.

All hobbyists that I know, some into model airplanes, golf, cars, all subscribe to numerous magazines to keep abreast and informed.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4719




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2014, 12:29:54 PM »

Al,

I read somewhere at the at the beginning of the US involvement in WW1, the Navy asked for 500 amateurs as operators - and although ARRL was dormant, they found them for the Navy in 2 weeks!


WW2 was different - the famous order from the US Navy to the National Company  -'Make HROs until we tell you to stop!'  The BC610, derived from the Hallicrafters HT4 - the Allies armed forces owed a lot to amateurs, and over here, it was somewhat recognised  after the war by various forces trades being exempted from the technical and Morse licence requirements.

There have been a few instances since then of amateur gear being used by the military - an amateur transceiver is much cheaper and can be thrown away if stops working.

73

Peter G3RZP

Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3900




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: March 06, 2014, 07:12:14 AM »

RZP:  Peter, according to what have read, including the incredible book, "Most Secret War," amateur radio has always played a significant part in the military.  Even during the cold war, many amateurs became instructors in the various types of code learning schools as well as the electronics teaching schools.

The reason was the speed in which they achieved the military goals and subsequently were switched into teaching assignments rather than actually doing the job for which they were trained.

As you point out, in WWI the hams filled a very deep hole fast and during WWII, again from what I read, the US found a vast source of radio operators and instructors in the amateur ranks no doubt learning from WWI.  However this time, unlike WWI, the amateur ranks had swelled by the thousands.

I think this is one of the reasons why the amateur service has been pretty much left alone during frequency allocation conferences as well as the usual governmental interference. 

Also in the US, the amateur community has always been available during times of crisis, operating when all other services are down. 

Al
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4719




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2014, 11:38:51 AM »

Al

>Also in the US, the amateur community has always been available during times of crisis, operating when all other services are down.<

Not only the US. 1982 " Victor Papa Eight Falklands" was a valuable source of intel for the British forces. Then 1992 from occupied Kuwait....

Then there was Governor of Washington State in the floods the other year '"The heroes in this are the hams"...

and yet you still get dumb jerk councils and HOAs who don't want ham radio.......

Personally, I'd like to see the ARES ignore anything in an emergency on an estate where the HOA wouldn't allow ham antennas. Your house burned down and ham radio could have avoided it? Tough! Blame your HOA Nazis!
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!