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Author Topic: Power Connectors for Mobile Rigs  (Read 5046 times)
K6CPO
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Posts: 127




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« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2014, 03:20:30 PM »

5Y:  Let me add something about the Anderson Power Poles connectors.  First of all I'm a firm believer in them.  They pretty well have standardized the ham radio power connector options.

The main point I want to make is it isn't necessary to buy the ratcheting type crimper which will set you back around $50.00.

One mentioned the Klein crimp tool.  I think that is a standard electrician solderless connector crimper.  If it is, either one will cost you $25.00 or less and will do a great job. 

If you use this type tool, rotate the connector in the tool so the connector "split" in in the concave part of the tool. 

If you put the rounded side of the connector into the concave part the "spike" part of the tool will go down into the "split" and ruin the connector.

Funny, that's just exactly the opposite of the way I crimp Powerpoles with the Klein tool.  I put the "spike" into the "split" of the connector and crimp.  I then have to re-form the shape of the connector so it will fit into the plastic part of the Powerpole as the crimper flattens it slightly.  I've never had one of these fail and I've done a bunch of them. 
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NZ5Y
Member

Posts: 20




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« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2014, 04:01:50 PM »

Who knew crimpingwas so ccomplicated!  Now I have another question.  My 1973 vintage crimping tool has a concave half moon that fits with the convex half-moon,  both just half-pound  Now I see a lot of standard crimping tools with a "spike"  on one half.  Is this better?  Not sure if I need to upgrade at least to a new standard crimper or use my old half moon version.
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Steve NZ5Y
K8AXW
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Posts: 3645




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« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2014, 08:07:54 AM »

Quote
I then have to re-form the shape of the connector so it will fit into the plastic part of the Powerpole as the crimper flattens it slightly.

I left that little detail out of my description/explanation.  Crimping with the spike in the split does two things.  It distorts the connector and it actually separates the connector with some of the wire strands going into one side, some of the wire strands going into the other side and some strands left uncrimped in the split.  

It should also be noted that using a "concave or half-moon" that is too large will also distort the connector.

Many years ago I read the instructions for using the solder-less crimp connectors which stated in part, "....when properly crimped the wire and the connector become one homogeneous mass."  The definition of "homogeneous" being, "Uniform in structure or composition throughout."

When the connector is placed in the Klein (Or the identical electricians crimp tool) tool with the split in the half-moon and the spike pushing into the back or smooth side of the connector, there is no distortion and the connection has a better chance of becoming this "homogeneous" mass.

IMHO, the crimping tool with the "spike" is better than the two half-moons for crimping solder-less connectors like the Power Poles.  Many crimpers use the two half-moon or octagon design but they are usually used on cable where it's undesirable to crush whatever is in the tool unlike the solder-less connectors we're talking about.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2014, 08:28:09 AM by K8AXW » Logged
K2YO
Member

Posts: 436




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« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2014, 08:32:46 AM »

Who knew crimpingwas so ccomplicated! 

It's not when you use the manufacturor specified crimp tool. In this case an Anderson model 1309, costing $234 here;
http://www.powerwerx.com/crimping-tools/anderson-crimping-tool-15-30-amp-powerpole.html

The problem is we are all trying to save money, me included. So we use less than the manufacturor's specified tool. I've never tried an Anderson brand tool, but I have use a couple of the aftermarkets designed for power poles and they are a one shot crimp with no distortion to the connector.

Bernie
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NZ5Y
Member

Posts: 20




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« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2014, 08:45:31 AM »

Thanks all.  And I've found all this very interesting.  After 40 years around radios and electronic equipment, I've never really looked at crimping.  I have the old crimp tool, and I've used pliers before, and very often the connector is destroyed or mashed beyond recognition.  And so often they come loose that I always solder them too.  But it appears that should not happen if done properly.

I have exactly 3 radios to share between shack and cars, so I'll only have a total of about 12 crimps to make, so I'll probably opt for my standard tool and not buy the Anderson tool. 

Even us oldtimers have new things to learn!

Steve
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Steve NZ5Y
W1BVV
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Posts: 35




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« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2014, 09:11:51 AM »

I fully recognize that Power Poles have been adopted as the defacto standard Ham power connector especially for mobile and emergency equipment, BUT...

As an electrical engineer I do not understand the thinking behind a non-polarized, non-gendered connector that has to be held together with a cable tie to be reliable, for power interconnection.  Seems to me, especially in an emergency situation (like in the dark) there is a good chance of reversing polarity or cross connecting two power sources.

There are many high reliability power connectors on the market and NEMA classifies and standardizes them.

Dave, W1BVV
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KA5IPF
Member

Posts: 979


WWW

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« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2014, 09:30:56 AM »

I fully recognize that Power Poles have been adopted as the defacto standard Ham power connector especially for mobile and emergency equipment, BUT...

As an electrical engineer I do not understand the thinking behind a non-polarized, non-gendered connector that has to be held together with a cable tie to be reliable, for power interconnection.  Seems to me, especially in an emergency situation (like in the dark) there is a good chance of reversing polarity or cross connecting two power sources.

There are many high reliability power connectors on the market and NEMA classifies and standardizes them.

Dave, W1BVV

If you use the "defacto standard" glued together red/black pairs they cannot be hooked up backwards. Just like the old "T" connector cannot be hooked up wrong.
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