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Author Topic: What do you listen to on SW?  (Read 51628 times)
HAMMYGUY
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Posts: 88




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« on: March 06, 2014, 03:24:50 PM »

I'm mainly a MW (AM Band) listener.  The SW bands have been taken over with station after station after station of religious broadcasting.   Finding interesting broadcasts within the 49m, 41m, and 31m broadcast bands are a waste of time.  With the exceptions of possibly Radio Havana or China Radio International.  Of course there are the ham bands which provides some good entertainment. 

I'd really like to find out what you listen to.  Please post your frequencies and possibly broadcast times in GMT. 

There has to be more out there.   
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KB0XR
Member

Posts: 43




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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2014, 05:13:50 AM »

Buy a copy of Popular Communications or Monitoring Times.  Both have frequency listings for you to try.  There's plenty out there.  It takes a little more effort than in years past.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2591




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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2014, 08:51:03 AM »

Quote
Buy a copy of Popular Communications or Monitoring Times.

"Monitoring Times has ceased publication.http://www.monitoringtimes.com/

European longwave AM stations are still interesting if you can pick them up in your location.
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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 139




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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2014, 08:51:23 AM »

If you aren't coming across the still vast number of English services across the bands at any given time of day, I suspect you need more antenna. Most of it comes from transmitters overseas. You seem to be only getting the religious US-based BCs, which makes me think that.
Here's a very helpful site that you can use to direct your dial
http://www.short-wave.info/index.php
Here in SFO, I can get BBC, VOA, Vietnam, China, N. Korea, DeutschWelle, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Africa, Romania, Iran, and more just in English, throughout the day.
I have to admit, Brother Stair is getting a bit too heavily into every band though, almost 24-7. Dude's on a mission Undecided
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KC6RCM
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2014, 12:02:04 PM »

Longwave.

NDB DXing in the 200 to 500kHz region of the band.  Their CW ID is continuous, so one can quickly log and move on to the next signal.  Wintertime evening months are best, when the band conditions are optimal.
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WN4V
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Posts: 11




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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2014, 05:59:21 PM »

Another source you can use is www.primetimeshortwave.com. Schedules for English broadcasting by frequency and worldwide geographic areas are updated regularly. These schedules are printable.

Jon WN4V
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K4TPC
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2014, 07:46:29 PM »

Radio Romania International has great broadcasts. Also, in the USA, "WBCQ The Planet" has funky shows.

Freqs and scheds for all kinds of radio broadcasts:  http://www.shortwaveschedule.com/

Enjoy.
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VK3DWZ
Member

Posts: 48




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« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2014, 07:53:22 PM »

I've been listening to shortwave for well over 50 years now, and I agree there's not that much to listen to now compared with the 1960's.  The bands are filled with Religious broadcasters and Chinese stations.  However, there's still a lot to be heard if you look hard enough.  My favourites are: Radio Japan, Radio New Zealand, Voice of Korea (Pyongyang: with some very nice Korean music -- I requested that they play more music on their programs and they complied), Radio Taiwan International and China Radio International. 

It's a pity that the broadcasts are not nearly as good as they were.  C.R.I. is a pale shadow of its previous self -- I won a C.R.I. trip in 2004 and then their programs were very entertaining.  Now the programs seem to be nothing more than people with thick Chinese accents talking so quickly you can't understand them!  And the B.B.C. is also a pale shadow of its former self.  I know, I was listening in the good old days.

One thing tho', Americans are lucky to be able to hear Brother R.G. Stair so much on SW.  Here, we can't hear him at all on SW so we can only hear him on his website.  Pity as I would  like to hear him when away from the computer.
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WA8ZTZ
Member

Posts: 55




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« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2014, 02:07:41 AM »

Buy a copy of Popular Communications or Monitoring Times.  Both have frequency listings for you to try.  There's plenty out there.  It takes a little more effort than in years past.

Unfortunately, both ceased publication in December.   Sad  You will have to do some digging on the internet to find SW broadcast listings.

You may want to diversify your listening by trying non-broadcast HF, or longwave, or scanning. 

So, yes, there is still plenty out there.
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KB0XR
Member

Posts: 43




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« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2014, 05:57:32 AM »

Buy a copy of Popular Communications or Monitoring Times.  Both have frequency listings for you to try.  There's plenty out there.  It takes a little more effort than in years past.

Unfortunately, both ceased publication in December.   Sad  You will have to do some digging on the internet to find SW broadcast listings.

You may want to diversify your listening by trying non-broadcast HF, or longwave, or scanning. 

So, yes, there is still plenty out there.

Guess I didn't notice I have not got an issue in awhile.  I have a long subscription so I better check into it and see if there is a digital version available.  Thanks for the info.
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WA8ZTZ
Member

Posts: 55




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« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2014, 10:28:08 AM »

Some of the former MT contributors have started their own internet only "magazine" called "Spectrum Monitor".

Pop'Comm is out of print but a digital version of it has been folded into the digital "CQ Plus".
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KI5WW
Member

Posts: 75




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« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2014, 05:07:48 PM »

Longwave.

NDB DXing in the 200 to 500kHz region of the band.  Their CW ID is continuous, so one can quickly log and move on to the next signal.  Wintertime evening months are best, when the band conditions are optimal.

Havent done that in a while. Thats kinda fun. Used to cpy one from GA here in western Ok. You can go to AirNav.com and look it up once you copy the three character identifier. AirNav will give you power,out put, ant info and lots more,info as well. Need to try thatmsome more. Usemyour longest ant for that. I use 80 meter dipole.  But use what ya got.

My son flys.  Pilots use these signals through a compass for navigation. All there ant are really hi!  But just a peace of wire about 8 feet long,but in "free space" around 5000 feet or so.  But these beacons propagate well at night. As my statement above suggest.  Listen for a "weak signal". All are weak. Sorry for the sloppy work, but im sleepy. Ill keep thinking. Of some more

Identifiers are all morse code but super super slow. Pilots have to have time to write them down and decyper them. Pilots need not know how to read morse code.

.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2014, 05:43:07 PM by KI5WW » Logged
RENTON481
Member

Posts: 75




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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2014, 10:00:01 PM »

I mainly listen to MW year round, and also listen to SW during the summer months.

On the shortwaves I listen to Radio Nacional Da Amazonia on 6180 khz., the BBC in the 41 meter band during the mornings (comes into the West Coast of the US from Singapore), Radio Australia and Radio New Zealand on the 31 and 21 meter bands (don't have my logbooks handy for frequencies), and sometimes stations from (and to) the Middle Eastern countries like Iran and Kuwait (if propagation's in) which I usually hear on the 21 and 25 meter bands -- those stations are interesting to listen to for the cool music they often play (once again, I don't have my log handy, but www.short-wave.info has good schedule information).

Radio Pyongyang also plays some interesting music. I'll give them a listen if I hear them. Radio Rebelde on 5025 khz plays a lot of good music at night, and is audible in most of the U.S.

The VOA's broadcasts to Africa and Asia in foreign languages can sometimes be interesting for the music played.

Sometimes I tune into the CW portions of the ham bands, to try to learn more of the code, and sometimes tune into the SSB portions of the ham bands if propagation seems to be bringing in DX.
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WW7KE
Member

Posts: 86




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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2014, 08:35:22 PM »

You will have to do some digging on the internet to find SW broadcast listings.

Put your shovel away.  Grin

Here are some links to shortwave broadcast info:
http://www.short-wave.info/
http://www.primetimeshortwave.com/
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W4JOP
Member

Posts: 5




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« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2014, 10:49:51 AM »

How about the World Radio TV Handbook?
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