Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tree as a Tower?  (Read 20971 times)
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2014, 08:08:09 PM »

I've seen some summer cottages which used the midsections of trees as foundation supports.  They are over a century old and still standing!
Logged
KD0ACY
Member

Posts: 91




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2014, 08:50:54 PM »

One more aspect you might want to consider--- Your homeowners insurance inspects prosperities, as them did mine, and they jacked up my premiums, more than a mid priced tower would have cost. They don't like dead trees!
Logged
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1821




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2014, 11:40:46 AM »

Re: W8JX

I have a few 20-30 ft. trimmed spruce/fir tree 6" dia. poles for Dipoles in ground for 15+ years, just coat in ground and 6" above ground section with liquid black Driveway sealer and on the very top flat, no need to seal rest, they will dry out faster. Did the same with all my cedar fence post 25+ yrs. ago and still standing.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 13032




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2014, 11:48:06 AM »

Remember, the OP was not talking about treating and using a tree that he had cut down. He was talking about just trimming the dead branches off a tree that has already died and just using it as it stands. The problem - the condition of the tree is unknown.
Logged
KC0KEK
Member

Posts: 144




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2014, 11:51:03 AM »

The problem - the condition of the tree is unknown.

It appears that a bug (Emerald ash borers?) killed it. It was fine until early this past summer, when it abruptly died. If I did nothing with it, it probably would be at least a few years before it started shedding limbs.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6061




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2014, 06:05:46 PM »

Something else that nobody mentioned.  Usually if the tree is in a wet area, the root system may not be so deep.  If the tree is in a dry area, the root system is probably deeper.  A shallow root system on a dead tree would probably rot pretty quickly while a deeper root system would be good for a few more years.
Logged
KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 2706




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2014, 05:07:56 PM »

This whole thing is a bad idea that can only end in tears!  I just hope no one gets hurt when that day comes.
Logged
KD0ZGW
Member

Posts: 169




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2014, 11:42:03 AM »

I have an almost dead tree adjacent to my house in a small stand of trees. 

I plan on trimming the top of said tree and using the tree as the mast for a hexbeam.  The tree will be guyed to adjacent ones which surround it.  I will post pics when I finally get it done.  (For now I am still waiting for the ground to dry out so I can get the boom lift out of the barn.)
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6061




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2014, 01:57:11 PM »

One of the dangers of an 'almost dead' tree is that all too often the tree trunk will be a hollow that won't support any weight. 

I remember about one tree surgeon who had to be cut out of one of those 'almost dead' trees because he put his weight on the thing up where major limbs were and the thing caved in on him.  His boot got stuck--badly--and since he couldn't get to it, he couldn't get his leg out.  The fire department and the city tree people finally got him freed--after about three hours.  Thank God he wasn't hurt badly.
Logged
N8XI
Member

Posts: 157




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: July 06, 2014, 05:25:20 AM »

Check out KZ4RR at qrz.com
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13574




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: July 06, 2014, 02:03:43 PM »

Quote from: K1CJS

Something else that nobody mentioned.  Usually if the tree is in a wet area, the root system may not be so deep.  If the tree is in a dry area, the root system is probably deeper.  A shallow root system on a dead tree would probably rot pretty quickly while a deeper root system would be good for a few more years.



It depends on the specific variety of tree.

Different trees decay at different rates:  some are strong and sturdy.  Good lumber often can be salvaged
10 years after a forest fire kills a stand of trees for good types.

On the other hand, some species rarely attain maturity without the core already starting to decay.

Then there is the root structure:  that is determined more by the type of tree than the amount of water
in the soil.  For example, the Coast Redwoods of California have a deep tap root - they can live in solid
groves and grow to 350+ feet before the wind blows them over.  By contrast, the Sierra Redwoods have
only a surface root system - they have to ground in a mixed grove with pines and firs to provide a
wind break, as they will blow over if they get much above the surrounding treetops.

Personally I'd feel much more comfortable mounting a beam on a Sitka Spruce than on a Cottonwood,
but those are trees that I'm familiar with.  As you can see from the redwood example, even closely
related species can have significant differences in growth characteristics, which is why you need to
know the actual type of the tree.
Logged
KC0KEK
Member

Posts: 144




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2014, 08:15:35 PM »

I've decided to take the tree down because the diagnosis was hypoxylon fungus, which damages the tree so quickly and significantly that it can't support the weight of a climber. It has to be removed with a bucket truck to ensure safety. On the plus side, the wood doesn't have to season and can be burned this year.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!