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Author Topic: Exterior Wall Penetration options?  (Read 26958 times)
KD0ZGW
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Posts: 145




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« on: May 18, 2014, 10:29:33 AM »

About ready to erect a few antennas and looking at option s for cables into the house.

Wall penetration  (for now) will need to accomodate 2 coax and a couple of control cables (rotor and ant. sw.) plus a wire for station ground.

I'm thinking about installing a piece of PVC but was wondering what others do to seal up the pipe in a way that is easily re-opened.  We have harsh winters here and I'm rural so whatever I use to seal the pipe has to be weather and rodent proof.

suggestions for other options are welcomed.

KD0ZGW
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2014, 11:20:07 AM »

What I've done is to use a dryer hood outlet--not the little louvered things that are out now, but a hood.  terminate the inside with a covered box packed with fibreglass insulation.  Pack the PVC pipe with that too.  Pack the dryer hood with steel wool, you can buy that at a well stocked hardware store.  Don't forget to check the hood and the box every month or so to make sure nothing has tried to get the packing pulled out. 

What the steel wool won't stop--and there isn't much, the fibreglass will.  In addition, the fibreglass makes excellent insulating material.  Good luck and 73!
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KV7W
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« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2014, 02:48:25 PM »

The best way I've done it is with a  plastic electrical box for 2" conduit mounted to the side of the house and the inside "hole" finished something like a window.



It's all painted up and pretty now.
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LA9XNA
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« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2014, 08:05:42 AM »

I like the last solution, very clever.
Another option is to install a ventilation louver. To seal it just have a plastic bag with fiberglass insulation to stick in the hole trough the wall.
If you are going to install new cables just pull out the bag with insulation feed the cable through and stick the bag back in.
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K3GM
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« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2014, 09:42:01 AM »

I hired a concrete coring company to core an 8" hole in my 12" thick poured concrete wall.  The hole edges are sharp with no breakout, and I have to core to replace someday if I move from here.  As you can see, the hole is covered with a square aluminum plate.  The plate connectors are Polyphaser arrestors mounted to the backside of the panel within the hole which is packed with synthetic cushion stuffing for insulation.  All of the transmission lines, Beverage feeder coax, rotator and control cables, and a 24VAC  supply for a heated rain collector in my weather station gather into a trough just to the left, and then into a 150' long underground conduit out to the antenna sites.  The input panel is conveniently grounded (lower left corner) via SPG run from the towers, and back underground where it emerges and connects to the utility ground rod at the meter.  Like K1CJS, I use steel wool, in my case rustproof, stainless steel wool to keep varmits out of the conduit at either end.  Rodents hate that stuff.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2014, 10:05:28 AM by K3GM » Logged
W6CD
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2014, 11:37:52 PM »

I have two 4" PVC pipe about 6" long coming through the wall of my room finished garage / hobby/ ham shack.  On the outside are 90 degree elbows turned downward to keep out the rain.  To keep out the weather and undesirables they are stuffed with fiberglass insulation. Simple, cheap, and works.
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W6ZKH
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« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2014, 08:38:32 AM »

I have two 4" PVC pipe about 6" long coming through the wall of my room finished garage / hobby/ ham shack.  On the outside are 90 degree elbows turned downward to keep out the rain.  To keep out the weather and undesirables they are stuffed with fiberglass insulation. Simple, cheap, and works.

I've done the same thing in the past, but best to use Steel Wool instead of Fiberglass, as Mice wont eat Steel Wool, but love insulation.  At the moment, I am using one of those MFJ Window feedthru's which works very well for me, even though abit costly.
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K9OJT
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« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2014, 06:35:44 PM »

I have two 4" PVC pipe about 6" long coming through the wall of my room finished garage / hobby/ ham shack.  On the outside are 90 degree elbows turned downward to keep out the rain.  To keep out the weather and undesirables they are stuffed with fiberglass insulation. Simple, cheap, and works.

I've done the same thing in the past, but best to use Steel Wool instead of Fiberglass, as Mice wont eat Steel Wool, but love insulation.  At the moment, I am using one of those MFJ Window feedthru's which works very well for me, even though abit costly.


Good idea using steel wool...I have been using it for years but with a twist.

Before using the steel wool I seal the PVC with foam insulation...let it set and than ad STAINLESS STEEL WOOL.

The stainless variety last longer and the foam insulation keeps out an crawlies that may penetrate the steel wool.

73

Mike K9OJT

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N8YQX
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Posts: 78




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« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2014, 11:58:29 AM »

I stuff my PVC pipe with a piece of rag.  No bugs, no draft.

When I want to run more coax, I just pull out the rag, run more coax, and stuff the same rag in the PVC pipe.
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73,
N8YQX
W9XC
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« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2014, 12:38:33 PM »

What do you folks recommend for making a 2" or larger hole in a
brick-faced exterior wall to run a PVC pipe through? I believe the wall is
ordinary studs with drywall on the inside and brick facing on the outside
and fiberglass batting in between.

- Les, W9XC
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K3NB
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Posts: 37


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« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2014, 02:07:13 PM »

I have two 4" PVC pipe about 6" long coming through the wall of my room finished garage / hobby/ ham shack.  On the outside are 90 degree elbows turned downward to keep out the rain.  To keep out the weather and undesirables they are stuffed with fiberglass insulation. Simple, cheap, and works.

I've done the same thing in the past, but best to use Steel Wool instead of Fiberglass, as Mice wont eat Steel Wool, but love insulation.  At the moment, I am using one of those MFJ Window feedthru's which works very well for me, even though abit costly.


I did something similar, but I bought a couple of feet of 3"x 0.125" aluminum and some aluminum angle material and fabricated a window feed-though using some 3" barrel connectors for my PL-259 connections.  I used a copper lug connected to some 4 gauge copper wire to ground rods. 

Nice thing about this setup is it's grounded well (I have lightning arrestors connected by the same kind of lugs to the ground wire with coaxial jumpers to the feed panel), weatherproof, small/cheap/EZ to build and/or replace and temporary.  I put some 1" pine board in the window frame and caulked it in place so I can remove it all when I move. 

YMMV.
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KV7W
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Posts: 136




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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2014, 11:02:01 PM »

What do you folks recommend for making a 2" or larger hole in a
brick-faced exterior wall to run a PVC pipe through? I believe the wall is
ordinary studs with drywall on the inside and brick facing on the outside
and fiberglass batting in between.

- Les, W9XC


They make hole saws for masonry that sell at the home box stores. Chuck it up in a drill and it drills through. If your brick is thicker than the drill, there's enough room to jam a big screwdriver or tire iron in the gap and break out the core - then continue drilling. I'd take a long mason bit and drill through the sheetrock side first, that will give you a mark on the brick side. (You can go all the way through from the inside with an extension, but it's really easy to blow small chunks out around the outside of the hole when the saw cuts through - it's better to have that show on the inside.) Get just a little larger hole saw that what the OD of your pipe is, it's hard to force a pipe through brick. A 1/4" larger will end up leaving an 1/8" gap, which is just right for forcing caulk in to seal.

Then there's always the 1/2" mason drill and hammer/chisel method...
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K1CJS
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« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2014, 05:03:35 AM »

What do you folks recommend for making a 2" or larger hole in a
brick-faced exterior wall to run a PVC pipe through? I believe the wall is
ordinary studs with drywall on the inside and brick facing on the outside
and fiberglass batting in between.

I'd be very careful when drilling through brick-face.  The usual way that brick-face is installed is to spread it on steel mesh for the proper support.  (I've heard of some of the cheaper companies using what amounts to turkey wire for that purpose.)  One wrong move and you may end up damaging the wall if the hole saw 'grabs' that mesh and rips it from its fastenings.

I'd shy away from that method, especially if you don't know how that facing was installed.  Maybe it's unlikely, but it still may happen--remember Murphy's law!
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KA5PIU
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Posts: 446




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« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2014, 03:44:18 AM »

Hello.

By far the best way is with a electrical Pothead on one side on one side and a blank electrical panel on the other side.
Do NOT cut up the original panel but use that as a template for aluminum or plastic.
You do not see rats eating away at electrical service entrance wires.
Provide a "Drip loop on your wires.
If, like in my case, you only have 5 cables and 3 wires, get an old CATV entrance box and the line entrance supports for the coax and the knob support/insulators for open wire feed.
The total cost, if you use parts from salvage, should be really cheap.
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K4JK
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Posts: 308




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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2014, 09:51:56 AM »

I came through my basement just above where the concrete starts, through the band board near the ceiling.

Used a 2.5" hole saw.

Mounted an enclosure from KF7P on the outside with a copper grounding plate inside. Alpha delta arrestors are mounted to the plate. 2 3/8" PVC runs though the hole into the enclosure and is held snug by one of those locking collars with the metal band.

I spray foamed around the small gap next to the PVC and caulked around the back of the box.

The top mounting holes of the box are screwed into the wall of the house with normal wood/sheet metal screws, the bottom holes fasten to the concrete with TapCon screws.

Has worked out great so far.
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ex W4HFK
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