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Author Topic: Math and radio.  (Read 1493 times)
KA5PIU
Member

Posts: 446




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« on: June 03, 2014, 08:29:11 PM »

Hello.

First, all of the new radios use the CPU, so math is a given.
The older radios used crystals and multipliers, again. math.
But, who all knows the significance of N=n+ in radio?
And, why is it that radio will run out of spectrum at 10,000 nanometers.
What is at 300 MHz?
What is it called?
And, what are the names of the group of numbers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_large_numbers
I bring this up as some people have said that they do not understand the American radio tests.
Even I have trouble with them, they are in an outdated format, the English measure.
To figure out how long 10 meters is in the metric system, use a "Yardstick" marked in meters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yardstick
I am not saying dumb the test down, but allow both English and Metric measure testing.
Once you look at my questions you will see a direct correlation between the metric system and radio.
I do not tune the the 32 foot band, I tune 10 meters.
There has always been this correlation between the metric system and radio.
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K9YLI
Member

Posts: 863




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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2014, 07:06:42 AM »

Thats part of the reason I will only  buy  tape measures with  metric  markings.

Also as I do some  hobby carpentry I prefer  using  metric measurements.

I find ilt easier to measure something as  396.5 centimeters and  go to the saw table,
than to remember   maybe  11 feet  7 and 9/16th inches 
or was it  11 feet   9 and  7/16ths   etc.

I know... write it down......
Metrics is easier to measure.   the old way is  easier to  estimate, as we have been doing it  for a long time.
Of course everyone should  KNOW the  width of their thumb nail  and  spread of their hand from  thumb to ring finger, for estimating.
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AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12843




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« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2014, 09:10:10 AM »

I've used metric for years when doing panel and PC board layout work.
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W9FIB
Member

Posts: 718




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« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2014, 06:43:44 PM »

I've used metric for years when doing panel and PC board layout work.


Depending on the customer, I use both in AutoCAD Electrical. Also have the conversion formulas pretty much memorized from use. So either one works for me.
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W3UEC
Member

Posts: 9




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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2014, 05:08:38 PM »

I prefer to use "old fashioned" measures -- cubits and spans. I like it particularly when someone then asks  me, "What's a cubit." Naturally I demonstrate  using an extended middle finger.
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