Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Overcoming "CQ anxiety"  (Read 8215 times)
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3827




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2014, 09:04:49 PM »

JKA:  I never figured you a former sailor from AK !

(Daymn, now I'll be hearing from former sailors and AK hams!)
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2801




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2014, 10:04:00 AM »

Mike fright is one thing - but if someone answers you, he's likely going to be using the same language you have been using all/most of your life.

When I was first licensed in 1959, I had 'phone privileges -- on two meters.  I didn't have any equipment yet for that kind of frequency.  We novices did have quite a bit of spectrum available to us:  CW spectrum.  We'd learned Morse code at probably close to ten WPM so we'd have a better shot at getting 5 WPM dispensed with. 

The second most scary point in my new hobby life was calling that first CQ on 15.  The FIRST scariest point was just a second after my "K".  When I heard "KN7KBN" coming out of that speaker and my hand wasn't anywhere near the key, I thought something was wrong!  How's that possible??

But as it always does, the adrenalin rush was only temporary.  I copied the other guy's call - KN4 something - in North Carolina!  That's around 2700 miles from Las Vegas!  We had a nice QSO somewhere between 5 and 12 WPM, and I was hooked.

You won't make QSOs unless you are on the air.  Listen for someone calling CQ if you don't want to do the CQing yourself.

Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KF5VPK
Member

Posts: 50




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2014, 12:27:06 PM »

I went through the mike fright thing... my hands were shaking so much I thought I would drop my 2m ht last year.

I made 2 QSOs, and particiapted in Field Day with 8 QSOs last year on 40m. I used a local clubs call, and radio, at their FD site last year.

My current QTH has too much RFI for me to hear anyone... but my move next month will be out in the country and there isn't much in the way of plasma tvs, and high pressure sodium street lights there. Being able to put up an outdoor HF antenna will be good to. I did try a PC pipe and 20 turns of my antenna coax on it, the RFI was reduced enough I could hear some people on the radio. Just not very well.

I still get nervous, but with practice being on the air that should go away.
Logged

KK4PNS
Member

Posts: 22




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2014, 09:44:44 AM »

I have been working with WB6NOA, Gordon West's Morse Code Course and it is an excellent program. I am up to about 11 WPM. However, I still have "mike fright"' or in this instance "key fright". However, if you search around the bands you can usually hear some ham working CW painfully slow. It is encouraging to hear another ham answering him at the same speed. I will continue to try to overcome my "key fright" and God Bless those hams who understand the CW learning process.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!