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Author Topic: Ferrites from consumer electronics cords - What mix?  (Read 4031 times)
N5INP
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Posts: 1027




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« on: June 08, 2014, 03:56:15 PM »

Just curious if anyone knows what mix ferrites that manufacturers put on consumer electronics cords. For example I've got some ferrites I salvaged from old video monitor cables. Was wondering what frequencies they would be most interested in trying to block?

Reference -

Quote
For RFI use, mix 31 is effective from 1-500 Mhz, mix 43 works from 20-250 Mhz, Mix 61 is for 200-1000 Mhz, and mix 77 favors .5-20 MHz.  These frequencies are those of the interfering signal to be eliminated, not the operating frequencies of the equipment to be protected

http://palomar-engineers.com/ferrite-products/ferrite-beads
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KA5PIU
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Posts: 446




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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2014, 08:18:48 PM »

Hello.

http://193.6.189.120/letoltes/HG0MAT/toroid_datasheet.pdf
Yes, color codes galore!
I found that the overall best ferrite core for all around noise reduction on AC lines come from old CFL, light blue.
The ones in computer power supplies are my next choice, and frequently the power inlet is not only fused, but filtered.
There are a lot of parts including the IEC power cord and connector that I keep.
So, there is no easy answer.
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NK7Z
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Posts: 822


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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2014, 09:03:27 PM »

Just curious if anyone knows what mix ferrites that manufacturers put on consumer electronics cords. For example I've got some ferrites I salvaged from old video monitor cables. Was wondering what frequencies they would be most interested in trying to block?

Reference -

Quote
For RFI use, mix 31 is effective from 1-500 Mhz, mix 43 works from 20-250 Mhz, Mix 61 is for 200-1000 Mhz, and mix 77 favors .5-20 MHz.  These frequencies are those of the interfering signal to be eliminated, not the operating frequencies of the equipment to be protected

http://palomar-engineers.com/ferrite-products/ferrite-beads
Most older monitors etc., use a mix43 ferrite...  Mix43 is good at 20 meters, and up.  For lower frequencies, try a mix31 ferrite...  Remember more turns are better than more ferrites...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KA5PIU
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Posts: 446




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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2014, 06:11:06 PM »

Hello.

Remember that most places source from several vendors and what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another.
I look at reuse of old stuff if at all possible so things like this piques my interest.
Thank you.
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N5INP
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2014, 04:15:50 AM »

Remember that most places source from several vendors and what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another.

What do you mean by "... what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another." ?
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NK7Z
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« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2014, 06:42:02 AM »

Remember that most places source from several vendors and what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another.

What do you mean by "... what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another." ?
I wondered about that as well, I was under the impression that the "mix" numbers were a creation of Fair-Rite, and that the other core makers had their own mix designations...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
KA5PIU
Member

Posts: 446




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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2014, 07:50:16 PM »

Remember that most places source from several vendors and what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another.

What do you mean by "... what may be mix X to one supplier is something else to another." ?
I wondered about that as well, I was under the impression that the "mix" numbers were a creation of Fair-Rite, and that the other core makers had their own mix designations...

Correct.
Fair-Rite has its house numbering scheme, and it is NOT an industry standard.
What Is an industry standard is the color code.
Taiwan, China, France, they all go by color code.
Thank you.
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