Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Learning CW  (Read 12166 times)
AD0AE
Member

Posts: 78




Ignore
« on: November 09, 2011, 04:48:02 AM »

Hey All-

I am really interested in learning CW.  I live in an apartment and CW is about the only type of transmission I seem to be able to reliably hear on any given evening.  So I am interested in taking it on.  I am especially interested in the Koch method because I think learning at or around 15 wpm would probably be pretty useful.

That being said, what is everyone's suggestion about learning the code? 

A few things seem to be true...
1. Everyone takes a varying amount of time to learn the code
2. It seems like practicing everyday helps

At any rate, I would just like to hear some more thoughts!

Steve
Logged
QUEDAWG
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2011, 05:10:29 AM »

www.AA9PW.com is a great site for learning code.  Consistent daily practice makes a big difference.   I am trying to learn at 15wpm character speed with 10wpm spacing (Farnsworth method).  Was doing fairly well but got sidetracked for a couple of weeks and definitely lost a lot.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12832




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2011, 05:18:52 AM »

Use short 15 minute practice sessions - several every day.
Key the characters at 15WPM. Start with long spacing and reduce the spacing over time to increase speed. Hearing the characters at 15WPM forces you to learn the sound of the character rather than counting dits and dahs. Any of the cute association techniques that help to memorize the characters also hinder you from reaching higher speeds because your mind has to go through the extra translation step. Take the extra time to learn the characters by sound from the start and you'll move up to 25WPM in short order.
Logged
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2011, 12:58:31 PM »

Type in google "learning CW" or "learning Morse Code"

OR just read numerous threads on this website about the subject that everybody who is more or less proficient in the code is willingfull to reply, but it seems to be a 78 rpm antique grammophone record with the pick up needle jumping back and back agn.


What I learned from the questioners is that they ask but they don't have the perseverance to succeed, so my advice to those guys is: Go to the pub and drink a beer with your comrades, because you will not make it, and hence when you start: the time you are going to invest (during 2 weeks up to 2 months or so) is purely wasted.

You are failing and that increases the honor and glory of the guys that made it.

Don't ask, JUST DO IT.

Bob
« Last Edit: November 09, 2011, 01:02:26 PM by PA0BLAH » Logged
AE4RV
Member

Posts: 952


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2011, 01:54:21 PM »

PA0BLAH is right - you will need dedication and strength of will to succeed. But fortunately it really isn't THAT hard and is quite rewarding. Try these two links:

http://www.g4fon.net/CW%20Trainer.htm

http://www.justlearnmorsecode.com/

Good luck, we're here for ya.

73, Geoff
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3827




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2011, 07:12:40 PM »

Quote
Type in google "learning CW" or "learning Morse Code"

OR just read numerous threads on this website about the subject that everybody who is more or less proficient in the code is willingfull to reply

Very good reply.  This subject has been covered many time on this particular forum and any additional "advice" you receive will simply be repetition.

Quote
You are failing and that increases the honor and glory of the guys that made it.


You can fertilize 40 acres with this load!

Quote
But fortunately it really isn't THAT hard and is quite rewarding. Try these two links:



Excellent advice.  But, you really do need that "CAN DO" attitude.  If you don't have it, do as BLAH suggests, go have a beer.
Logged
KF5HZL
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2011, 07:56:12 PM »

I wrote an app that can help you learn CW. It uses a variation of the Koch method. Instead of progressing when you can copy 90%, it measures how long it takes for you to respond to spoken characters and you only progress when you've reached that time durring the CW lesson. I call it the Timed Response Method.

If you have an iPhone, it's in the app store under CWtime.

If you just need a practice oscillator, you can download Morse Button for free!

Good luck in your training!
Logged
K6JRS
Member

Posts: 5




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2011, 09:29:44 AM »

I am also just beginning the process of learning CW. My goal is to operate at least 50% CW at Field Day 2012. I have a code practice oscillator from the time I was first licensed and a shiny new Speed-X should be delivered today!

Good Luck Steve and thanks for the encouragement from everyone.

73,
Jay  K6JRS
Logged
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2011, 10:42:54 AM »

Gd luck Jay,

Remember:
When you are talking about what you are going to do: You certainly need phone,

When you talk about what you performed and did, CW is perfect.

About the topic starter, he was planning over 2 years ago, so his plans are based on solid rock in the mean time:
http://www.eham.net/ehamforum/smf/index.php/topic,47314.msg327580.html#msg327580
Logged
N3JIY
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2011, 02:29:41 PM »

I used a set of tapes called Code Quick.   I recommend using this system.    Google "Code Quick".
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3879




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2011, 03:48:28 PM »

http://www.eham.net/articles/23837

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
VA7CPC
Member

Posts: 2385




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2011, 08:24:02 PM »

Hey All-

I am really interested in learning CW.  I live in an apartment and CW is about the only type of transmission I seem to be able to reliably hear on any given evening.  . . .

An answer to a question you didn't ask:.

Tune to 14.070 / USB.  If you can hear signals (slightly rough whistles), they're PSK31.  It's a "keyboard-to-keyboard" mode.  It's not as good as CW for weak-signal work, but it's close.  It's not as good for DX or contesting.

To use that mode, you'll need a computer and a "soundcard interface" ($50 - $100 if bought, cheaper as a kit or homebrew).  The software is free.  The learning curve is very short.

                Charles

PS -- no flames, please !!!!  When I had 5 watts and a balcony antenna, PSK31 and CW, both, kept me sane.
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3827




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2011, 09:40:37 AM »

Quote
PS -- no flames, please !!!!  When I had 5 watts and a balcony antenna, PSK31 and CW, both, kept me sane.
 

No flame Charles.... I use both PSK31 and CW (also SSB) but would like our opinion on something.

Do you get the same 'personal' feeling working PSK31 as you do with CW?  When I work PSK31 I feel as if I'm working a machine....or really a computer with a human operator....and don't get that "personal" intimacy I get when I work someone on CW.

Don't get me wrong... PSK31 is great but with all of the macros availale everything seems "canned" and it doesn't hold my interest for very long.  It also seems that PSK31 contacts are just a series of the aforementioned "canned" statements and then it's over.

Whereas with CW most of my contacts last from 15 minutes to an hour or so.  Just a question.
Logged
PA0BLAH
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: November 14, 2011, 02:59:08 PM »



Do you get the same 'personal' feeling working PSK31 as you do with CW?  When I work PSK31 I feel as if I'm working a machine....or really a computer with a human operator....and don't get that "personal" intimacy I get when I work someone on CW.

Don't get me wrong... PSK31 is great but with all of the macros availale everything seems "canned" and it doesn't hold my interest for very long.  It also seems that PSK31 contacts are just a series of the aforementioned "canned" statements and then it's over.

Whereas with CW most of my contacts last from 15 minutes to an hour or so.  Just a question.


Hi hi Oc, hw abt writing on this forum.  No personal feelings? Just a machine?
And when you have rag chew contacts, and finally meet the ham is that the picture you had from him or completly different?

Bob (can't sleep)
Logged
VA7CPC
Member

Posts: 2385




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2011, 10:43:12 AM »

Quote
Don't get me wrong... PSK31 is great but with all of the macros availale everything seems "canned" and it doesn't hold my interest for very long.  It also seems that PSK31 contacts are just a series of the aforementioned "canned" statements and then it's over.

My "brag file" is really short.  And other macros are minimal.

I rag-chew a lot on PSK31.  I can type just a little faster than PSK31 can transmit, so I don't limit myself to macros.  If somebody wants to talk about boats, or cars, or travel, or propagation, or what to do in Vancouver BC, or how to get rid of squirrels, I'm happy to oblige.   

If they want a quick QSO (and sometimes that's what _I_ want), that's OK too.

No digital mode (including CW) gives the _personality_ of a human voice.  But if you listen to what's coming in, and keep a conversation going for a while, you can get a sense that there's a real person at the other keyboard (or paddle).

I find that easier to do with PSK31 (at 30 wpm), than with CW (at 15 wpm - 20 wpm).  I've been sitting at a keyboard for decades, and it's more natural for me to type, than to paddle.   If I had learned CW as a kid, things would be different -- but I came to it when I was around 60.

[The mode I find impossible for rag-chewing is Olivia -- it's just too slow for me.]

There's enough room for all of us.<g>

             Charles 




Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!