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eHam Forums => Clubs => Topic started by: AC4BB on July 09, 2016, 01:10:17 PM



Title: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AC4BB on July 09, 2016, 01:10:17 PM
  I love the club ours just got wayyyyy  to political. when they stopped listening to common sense I quit them.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB4ZT on July 10, 2016, 03:18:26 PM
When you say "political", do you mean internal politics (like "company politics"), or do you mean they obsessed too much about "politics" politics.   They reason I ask is that a few years ago I decided to attend a local club meeting as a guest.  Talking to the president, he said "we talk radio, and 'other things'".  Warning. Warning. Danger Will Robinson.  Sure enough, talk devolved to highly partisan politics.  I never went back. 

73,

Richard, AB4ZT


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AC7CW on July 11, 2016, 02:00:44 PM
I got a club newsletter wherein the main editorial, written by the club president, was about how terrible the war in Iraq was. Not a word about radio in the article... I asked for my dues back and never got a reply. I was talking to the same guy about my original callsign, WV6IYL and he argued with me there had never been WV6 calls!! Outside of that one jerk it wasn't a bad club at all, they had some great events, not a lot of them but they were great... if you are sensitive and one jerk can put you off of something then a lot of clubs are going to be a problem I guess. I'm learning MBTI slowly, learning to understand that different people are wired differently. That makes it a lot easier to get along. It doesn't make everybody's behavior correct though.

How many clubs have a clubhouse with a workshop and test equipment? How many have interesting speakers every meeting? How many have a club station and a remote station for people that can't have their own? I'd think that a club's appeal to more people would increase the more they had to offer to all the different personality types and areas of interest, no?


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KH6AQ on July 18, 2016, 05:30:29 AM
Club politics is why I have not joined a ham club in decades.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: ONAIR on July 18, 2016, 09:35:18 AM
Clubs need to post "No politics allowed" signs!!  ::)


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: LONESTRANGER on July 21, 2016, 04:19:23 PM
Ours was obsessed with bylaws.  Spent the entire meeting once arguing over the meaning of ONE word in the bylaws.  Another problem was 90% obsession with D-Star, repeaters, Emcomm, etc.  Clubs not much use anymore, find some buds who enjoy the same operating as you and hang with them.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KE4ZHN on July 26, 2016, 02:20:47 PM
Too many egomaniacs trying to run the club. That's what kills them all.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: N9LCD on August 01, 2016, 06:41:15 PM
Lack of term limits and failure to rotate officers and committee chairs.

After more than one bummer -- not necessarily in ham radio clubs -- I firmly subscribe to: One year to learn; One year to do; One year to teach or guide; and YOU'RE RETIRED!

If an organization can't find somebody to stepup and assume a leadership role, that's a good indication that the organization doesn't mean much to the membership.

N9LCD   


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K8PRG on September 10, 2016, 12:15:05 PM
I've been a ham almost two years now....joined a local club and has been a good one.
We own a repeater, several members have offered to help out with any problem I may have (ham related of course), we hold annual hamfest, field day, bus trip to Hamvention, we activiated a NPOA site.....of the 170 members, about 50 show up at monthly meeting.....no politics in sight...I'm lucky I guess.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KK5DR on September 11, 2016, 08:29:33 AM
Locally, nearly all the radio clubs in this area have almost no membership outreach. They spend very little time or effort on "growing" the membership base.
One of the main reasons is that the club meetings and events are BORING.
For young hams, there is very little interest in regular club activities, it's just too dry and boring.
Why is this happening?
I blame the "Old Guard", the old farts in control of the club. These geezers maintain control over club activities, and direct them. They like "Old School", boring old stuff.
They meet once a week, or month, and eat dinner, discuss the club budget, and then things get really boring. I've been there, seen an heard it, and never went back.
If you want young hams to join, and stay in the club, you must stimulate the mind.
The club should plan events. Not just field day, or a seasonal hamfest. The club must plan and execute club events in the public. Set up a ham station in the public park, put up signs inviting the public to come, ask questions, have a snack, get info in ham exam sessions.
My local club stopped holding exam sessions over ten years ago. I think the VE team just got lazy. I feel there should be sessions held 4 times a years, come one, come all. It's better than nothing. I digress.
A public, active presence in the community, interesting lectures and demos, youth outreach and training young hams, these are what is needed to have a viable club with involved and active membership.
My Canadian ham friend describes his club meetings to me. They have all age groups, all classes of licenses, nearly full meeting sessions each week. They have demos and lectures on interesting subjects by expert members. They train all members to use the club station, which allows members that don't have their own gear to get on the air. They do public demos of ham radio, and try to answer questions asked by the public.

So, if you want a ham club that is growing and interesting to new members, the old geezers must give up the "stick in the mud" control, and get busy growing, or get busy dying...


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB3TH on September 11, 2016, 12:05:57 PM
There are two clubs 15 minutes away and lots of them if I want to drive 45 minutes, which I don't.  I joined one of the closer ones.  Never got anything by email announcing meetings, events or membership renewal.  I let it drop.  The other club, I sent an email asking if they wanted to go along with donating a set of ARRL books to the local library.  I offered to pay half.  The library has virtually nothing for kids or adults who might be interested.  Hardly any science books at all.  No music.  Lots of DVDs.  I never heard anything back from that club.  I wouldn't mind being involved in some club but there seems to be no interest on their part.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: SOFAR on September 11, 2016, 02:03:57 PM
There are two clubs 15 minutes away and lots of them if I want to drive 45 minutes, which I don't.  I joined one of the closer ones.  Never got anything by email announcing meetings, events or membership renewal.  I let it drop.  The other club, I sent an email asking if they wanted to go along with donating a set of ARRL books to the local library.  I offered to pay half.  The library has virtually nothing for kids or adults who might be interested.  Hardly any science books at all.  No music.  Lots of DVDs.  I never heard anything back from that club.  I wouldn't mind being involved in some club but there seems to be no interest on their part.

Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB3TH on September 11, 2016, 03:34:58 PM

Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.

I wasn't expecting one every month or anything.  Maybe just a 'welcome to the club' message.  I went to a field day, signed up and mailed them a check.  They cashed it.  Never heard anything again.  I wasn't on their membership list on the website.  Nothing.  That indicates a lack of interest and competence on their end.  There are other clubs.  I'll find one that's worth my time.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: ONAIR on September 11, 2016, 06:42:06 PM

Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.

I wasn't expecting one every month or anything.  Maybe just a 'welcome to the club' message.  I went to a field day, signed up and mailed them a check.  They cashed it.  Never heard anything again.  I wasn't on their membership list on the website.  Nothing.  That indicates a lack of interest and competence on their end.  There are other clubs.  I'll find one that's worth my time.
   Not even on their list?  I think you should ask them for a refund.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: WB0CJB on October 02, 2016, 05:57:14 AM
Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: DU7DVE on November 19, 2016, 02:55:57 PM
Too many egomaniacs trying to run the club. That's what kills them all.

That's what happens with our club too. Our president and his lackeys just want to be communicators for parades and think that this is amateur activity. No other "real" amateur activity.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: SHORTWIRE on December 02, 2016, 06:34:08 PM
If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

New hams who are not The Right Sort or Willing To Make An Effort bears most of the blame..

Many new Retarded EmCommies Marginally Motivated Hams expects the old ones to do all the work for them and being spoon-fed everything. I.E. A Waste of Air…

Amateur Radio is, or should be, a technical hobby for people with Inquiring Minds.
Many of the new ones just want to be a High Visibility Idiot or, at most, a C*ntester.  >:(


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: EJTDS on December 03, 2016, 08:45:27 PM
When i was a 16 year old Novice i went to the local club and took my 1st dx card to show a friend who was there. Well a "older" member saw my card and told me that qsl cards don't mean anything and i should just shove the card up my Rear End. I never went back to that club or any club.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: NK7Z on December 03, 2016, 09:10:35 PM
One learns so much just tuning an old Novice transmitter, building a dipole, using xtals to get on frequency...  The new hams miss that entire experience, and it is a shame...


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB1OC on December 09, 2016, 01:53:02 PM
I have read all of the posts in this thread a couple of times now. As background, the club that I am involved in has brought on over 50 new members in less than 2 years. I believe that there are plenty of younger folks out there who want to become Amateur Radio folks and many of them are turning out to be great Amateurs. What this takes is a commitment on the part of a club and its leadership to do two things 1) make opportunities to younger folks to get involved in the hobby and have active programs to develop and teach amateur radio skills and 2) be welcoming of younger people and their ideas and different approaches to things.

This takes some work on the part of a club but it is not that difficult and the rewards are tremendous. We have had a hand in getting almost 30 people into the hobby this past year and I have to say that this is by far and away the most enjoyable part of my entire Amateur Radio experience. It has also given the more Sr. folks in our club a real shot in the arm in terms of their participation and commitment to the Amateur Radio service.

For those who may not have had a good experience with a club I would say don't give up! Joining an active Amateur Radio Club that matches your interests can make a huge positive difference for you and your experience with Amateur Radio. There are many great clubs out there and its worth a few tries to find one that you enjoy and one where you can make some friends and learn about Amateur Radio.

- Fred, AB1OC
  President, Nashua Area Radio Club
  Visit us at http://n1fd.org (http://n1fd.org)


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: W7TX on December 12, 2016, 07:48:30 PM
When i was a 16 year old Novice i went to the local club and took my 1st dx card to show a friend who was there. Well a "older" member saw my card and told me that qsl cards don't mean anything and i should just shove the card up my Rear End. I never went back to that club or any club.

I don't blame you.  I went to a club meeting in my town in 1993 and got promptly ignored, then called a bootlegger because some 2 bit moron looked up my call in the callbook and didn't see my call.  I recently moved here and changed my call from an 8 to a 7. This was pre-internet and callbooks were out of date the day they were printed.  Didn't matter that I was advanced class and licensed in 1978.  I was shunned on the repeater, talked about behind my back, told to quit tying up the repeater when I did find a qso, etc.  They lost out on 23 years of my dues and their repeaters are mostly unused now. So now I am done with all Amateur radio clubs, I don't need them and they don't need me, and I don't need the aggravation. Same with repeaters.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KI7AAR on December 14, 2016, 09:30:40 AM
I'm losing interest in my club because all they ever talk about is the club repeaters.  They now have three repeaters on VHF and UHF (one is digital) and they were under utilized when we had two. I understand the import of repeaters but, they are really quite boring when hardly anyone uses them.

I really like to hear more about HF, station building, working DX, etc.  It's been months since I've even turned on the HT. HF is fun and rewarding, working repeaters is not.  I guess it's been months since attending a club meeting too.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB1OC on December 16, 2016, 05:48:33 PM
Different clubs often have different centers of interest. Sometimes a good experience can come down to finding a club whose members are interested in similar things that you are. You might also talk with the folks at the club you are in now and see if you could work with them to add some new areas to their focus.

The club that I am in has a long history of HF and Field Day operation. Lately we've add new focus on VHF/UHF (Satellites and DATV initially), on Fox Hunting, and on Homebrewing. Broadening out the focus areas of your club is one of the keys to getting it to attract and retain new members I think.

73,

Fred (AB1OC)
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org (http://n1fd.org)


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB1OC on December 21, 2016, 07:16:51 AM
WB0CJB is right about many things. Families are very stressed and pulled in many directions these days. The good news is that there are many great parents who want the best for their kids. Its important to understand this and work to make a positive difference in the family's lives through amateur radio. This means its more than just about getting people into your club.

Some time back, we put together a program in our club to help bring new people into our hobby. More recently, we've sharpened our focus on introducing younger people to STEM careers and learning through amateur radio. We still have much work to do but our early progress in getting young people interested in amateur radio has been good.

We are working on a video to share with other clubs on what we've been doing. Take a look at let us know what everyone thinks.

 https://vimeo.com/196586640 (https://vimeo.com/196586640)

Fred, AB1OC
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org (http://n1fd.org)


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB1OC on December 23, 2016, 04:55:38 PM
Sorry everyone, I think there might have been some problems accessing the video in the previous post. These should be resolved now and we would welcome your comments or suggestions.

73,

Fred, AB1OC
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org (http://n1fd.org)


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KD8YGW on February 16, 2017, 09:56:16 AM
I've been a ham almost two years now....joined a local club and has been a good one.
We own a repeater, several members have offered to help out with any problem I may have (ham related of course), we hold annual hamfest, field day, bus trip to Hamvention, we activiated a NPOA site.....of the 170 members, about 50 show up at monthly meeting.....no politics in sight...I'm lucky I guess.
Sounds like USECA. I'm in that one too and my experience is the same as yours.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K6CPO on February 16, 2017, 12:24:48 PM
Lack of term limits and failure to rotate officers and committee chairs.

After more than one bummer -- not necessarily in ham radio clubs -- I firmly subscribe to: One year to learn; One year to do; One year to teach or guide; and YOU'RE RETIRED!

If an organization can't find somebody to stepup and assume a leadership role, that's a good indication that the organization doesn't mean much to the membership.

N9LCD   

All well and good, but if no one steps up to do the job it doesn't work.

I'm starting my 5th year as President of a club in the San Diego area and the only reason I got the job in the first place is because nobody else was interested.  My predecessor served one year before stepping down due to health reasons and his predecessor served at least six years before "retiring." 

At Field Day last year, we had five or six people sign up to operate, which was pretty typical for us.  When Field Day actually arrived we had a total of four people at the site, only two of which were actually operating.  Pretty discouraging...  We're trying to stimulate more interest, but most of our members either work or go to school (or both.) 

As long as I'm President, I and my fellow board members will continue to stimulate interest, but I really don't know how to increase interest.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K1CJS on February 17, 2017, 10:21:08 AM
All too many clubs have a core membership that run everything--but they don't run for or hold office.  Those members just 'control' the club one way or another.  The other members know that they hold the reins and depend on them for the existence of the club. 

Anytime a new member (or group of new members) come in with new ideas and those ideas aren't taken favorably by the powers that be, those powers just express their displeasure, and the new members (or group) is forced right out the door sooner or later by the membership at large--the 'sheep' that always follow the leader.

The exception is when the new members/group is powerful or big enough to "take over" the club--a drawn out process that amounts to what is being called politics.  A good, steady club in my area was taken over just that way by out of towners who joined, a few at a time, and amassed enough power to push the older, long time members out of their niche.

Sometimes, just walking out IS the best answer to the so called problem.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AB1OC on February 17, 2017, 02:17:30 PM
I think having new and different activities for club members to do helps a lot. Consider putting together a kit build. Do a SOTA activation. Put together a balloon project with a local school. Get a crew together and help some put up a new antenna for someone. Try something different at your next field day (we added a satellite station and an ATV setup last time and both were hits). Consider putting together a team to enter a contest or to help with a special event. There are lots of options. Once you try a few, you'll pretty quickly find out what gets your members excited.

The other thing that has worked well for us is to really focus on bringing new and especially young people into Amateur Radio. For those of your who are concerned about changing club momentum in a positive way, this is a great approach to take. Check out the HAM Nation video on our home page (http://n1fd.org (http://n1fd.org)) for some more ideas on how you can go about this.

Our club was a somewhat of a turn around situation a few years back. We've been doing these sorts of things for about 2 years now. In that time we have almost tripled our membership to over 135 folks. The hardest part of all of this is getting started.

All you really need is two or three members who are committed to these kinds of things to get the ball rolling. This is especially true if you focus on the new and young HAM idea. We are finding that lots of people really want to get into Amateur Radio. All they need is for someone who is a HAM to reach out to them, help them to get licensed, and then most importantly - help them to get on the air and to get active in the hobby.

- Fred AB1OC


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: N9LCD on February 19, 2017, 05:33:04 PM
I USED TO belong to a club in the '90's.  I was a dues paying member, helped man the club's table at Fests and even drove members to & from fests.

One day I get a call from the club president.  "Can you drive a couple of our members out to the Fest next Sunday?"

"No."

"Why?"

"Sunday's the wife's birthday."

"The Fest is only Sunday. You can have her birthday some other day."

My response wouldn't pass the moderator's review.

My wife supports me in my radio interests & pursuits.  She encourages and helps me.

What the **** does the club do for me?

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!

 >:(

N9LCD
 


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: WD8DK on March 04, 2017, 01:56:37 AM
Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.

Exactly! A club of 40 is lucky to get 10 at a meeting. We have done everything from Field Day, Street Fair raffles and more to get the club's name out. We operate one of the better repeaters in the area. Still it is the same handful of people who come to meetings, serve as officials. It's a shame, as there are over 100 licensed hams within a 10 mile radius.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: ONAIR on March 04, 2017, 06:07:16 PM
Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.

Exactly! A club of 40 is lucky to get 10 at a meeting. We have done everything from Field Day, Street Fair raffles and more to get the club's name out. We operate one of the better repeaters in the area. Still it is the same handful of people who come to meetings, serve as officials. It's a shame, as there are over 100 licensed hams within a 10 mile radius.
   Interesting.  Do you know how many of those local hams in the area are active?  I've been to areas where a substantial number of hams are listed, but it seems that only a small number of them are actually still on the air.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: W1XWX on June 15, 2017, 08:41:39 AM
In my area there are only 2-3 clubs that actually DO anything other than bicycle races. :)

Yes most of them hold a weekly net and a monthly meeting --- but that's about it. Others are stuck-on EMCOM only. 73


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC4ZGP on June 15, 2017, 11:57:15 AM

Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause.

But the league says...

And the league means...

_ _ ... ... _ _

Kraus


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K1HMS on June 26, 2017, 10:02:36 PM

Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause.

But the league says...

And the league means...

_ _ ... ... _ _

Kraus

Kraus

Some of your post clearly shows you have real knowledge of radio and antennas, many are just trying to be funny but are flippant/annoying QRM on the threads, but "Hero worship of the ARRL is the main cause" given the question is "why clubs fail" I don't get. What does the ARRL have to do with whether a club is healthy and growing, or not?

We are a growing club (N1FD) due to "project nights", offering license and CW classes, hosting VE testing sessions, mentoring, having members write articles for a monthly news letter and much more. As Fred (AB1OC) writes above in this thread we reach out to the young to encourage STEM interests. The most recent was a high altitude balloon launch  (it went over 90,000 feet and crossed 3 state lines) with various sensors, APRS and GPS for live tracking, and a Go-Pro camera link. Local HS students participated.  None of these activities start or stop because there is a ARRL. ARRL is not the cause of clubs failing, or succeeding.

Now if the ARRL didn't exist it is likely Ham radio wouldn't continue to exist.

Spectrum is valuable real estate worth taking, making products RFI free costs money, and the thought of amateurs modifying/building non-type accepted equipment in non-channelized spectrum with ERIPs over 15kW scares a lot of people due to the potential impact to public safety and FAA comms, and the HOA lobby would be more than glad to see Hams put 10' under. Now throw in the concern over the preppers having a independent distributed comm solution without a single switch to turn it off.

There are a dozen organizations that have tried, and will keep trying to put pressure on the congresscritters to cut our coax for good.

We need guys in suits to put counter pressure on the congresscritters to keep the bands open. Guys that know their way around the Rayburn Building that have enough jingle in their pockets to live anywhere near Wash DC and cover a nice lunch for discussions with the congresscritters' staffers so they know our side of why Ham radio is important and the ability to sound the alarm to the Ham community if a threat appears. Those guys are the ARRL. 

We just wrapped up the ARRL field day with 3 towers and 4 beams, wire Vs, and a 3 el wire V beam array with 3 50' masts, 7 transmitters going the full 24 hours.  (I could have used you on CW). We put it up on a soccer field Friday and took it all down Sunday.  We got additional points by inviting State reps, the governor and congresscritters. It's a ARRL effort to counter weight the efforts of those making the case to pull our plug.

Unlike big pharma the Ham related industry isn't large enough to do the job, and if Hams went it alone what would that look like? If Hams showed up on the Washington Mall to protest it's likely they would be out numbered by tourist and other disorganized protesters by 4 to 1 on a typical day, and they wouldn't be noticed. Beside most Hams would never spend the money on a airline ticket.

Is ARRL perfect? No, far from it, I could write pages on the issues I believe they have wrong. But as a member I, and 170k other members, have a voice to try and fix it. If they stray too far we'll stop sending money and they will need new jobs.  QST is almost worth the $10/month to join.

Does ARRL always get what they want, no. They tried and couldn't stop the US Dept of Commerce from letting in non type approved LED noise generators light bulbs because it would irritate China. But look at it this way, ARRL only has 170k members, which isn't a position of strength.  AARP has 37 million members and nearly $1B/yr, and they don't always get what they want either.

73

K1HMS


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: WI4P on June 29, 2017, 10:10:36 AM
Very well said HMS.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K4FMH on July 03, 2017, 04:09:34 PM
Indeed! This seems to be extreme ritualism in many clubs. We dint know broadly because the ARRL (according to the guy in charge of the forms) doesn't compile information from the annual reports requested of affiliated clubs! I requested this info I. Order to do some work as Asst Dir of my Division..got this response. But the Central XYZ Amateur Racing Association only appeals to those who want to practice ham radio in this narrow style.

Good post!

In my area there are only 2-3 clubs that actually DO anything other than bicycle races. :)

Yes most of them hold a weekly net and a monthly meeting --- but that's about it. Others are stuck-on EMCOM only. 73


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC8MWG on July 04, 2017, 04:30:30 PM
I have belonged to our club for a couple of years now and I have to say I enjoy it. We all get along with each other prety well, and we try to plan fun events, especially during the summer months. We even try to plan some events so that they attract at least some public attention, like having a "ham radio in the park" event at one of the local parks in May, and posting signs directing people to our Field Day site that included the words "PUBLIC INVITED" (and yes, a few non-hams DID show up and stay for a while). Once, we even did a group project, assembling "Easy Digi" digital interface boards. Not everyone shows up for every event or meeting, but enough people show up to make things interesting.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: AC2EU on July 13, 2017, 07:04:16 AM
I've read some of the posts here and recognized most of these issues in local clubs.
If you have the luxury of having many clubs in your area, check them out. Each club has it's own culture from my experience.

You can't be too sensitive about the behavior of a couple of members, but focus on the collective "feel" of the club. Being a new Ham in a club where most have been doing it for decades is a bit tough at first.  Some will tell you that you are not a "real ham" because you didn't have to do code. Others assume that you are an idiot . Most are OK, though.

I was fortunate to find a club that had a mix of young and old guys and women too!
They also rotate the leadership. Clubs that are run by presidents that rule for life, are rife with strange internal politics and cronyism.
You have three choices in this situation.
1) accept it
2) lead an internal revolt against the "king".
3) find another club.

Also the focus should be on the hobby exclusively, not political agendas unless it has something to do with Ham radio. I personally haven't seen inappropriate politics in any of the clubs in my area.

My suggestion to those who feel that they are in an "old man's social club" is to do something to change it.
One of the worst things are some clubs where the meeting drone on about about minute details of club expense meeting after meeting. That will kill attendance in a hurry!

Rather than painful details, focus on the event and what roles the members will play.
Have discussions about topics of interest, presentations, 'show and tell' or mini-events at the meetings.  Promote the agenda on the email list so the members are aware that the club is doing something different and interesting for a change.

Ask for input from the members about what they find compelling about the hobby.
Throw some topics in that they know nothing about as well to keep it fresh.

Sometimes you will have to champion your own ideas, rather than sitting in a boring meeting and grumbling discontent. Offer to do a presentation or plan a club event. Make suggestions and be willing to back them up with your personal involvement. After a while, others will do the same.
I have found these to be the most effective strategies to improve a club.

Our club has members ranging from age 8 to 98.  Everyone brings something to the table in a some way. There are contesters, rag chewers, Emcoms, techies, and "appliance operators" . Everyone participates.

Our field  day showcases all sorts of ham technology, solar, satellite,emergency power, field deployed wifi, computerized network logging, digital modes, etc.
Next year we may include an Arden system to provide internet.







Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: NA4IT on September 16, 2017, 04:04:53 PM
I used to post about supporting clubs. But, after this week, I will NEVER join another ham radio club EVER!

In fact it has soured me so much, I'm thinking about leaving amateur radio entirely.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC4ZGP on September 16, 2017, 04:38:55 PM

NA4IT,

Don't leave the hobby because of one thing.

Why you even took up the hobby is why you should stay.

I like building. I'm going to play CW on 160 meters, 1.815MHz. Come on down.

Kraus



Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: NA4IT on September 17, 2017, 11:15:19 AM
I took up the hobby because I heard two other hams on my police scanner participating in SKYWARN. I also pledged to use my hobby for God. Seems people 1) don't want you to serve and 2) could care less about God.

I just had it with all the political garbage that goes on.


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC4ZGP on September 17, 2017, 01:35:27 PM

Never give up.

Kraus


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC4ZGP on September 18, 2017, 09:24:18 AM

NA4IT,

Let's meet on CW. We'll talk God.

Kraus


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: K4FMH on September 20, 2017, 06:54:59 PM
While this does not reflect every club, it's a clear pattern in oh so many. Kills the broader interests of the non-EmCom ham community.

73

Frank

In my area there are only 2-3 clubs that actually DO anything other than bicycle races. :)

Yes most of them hold a weekly net and a monthly meeting --- but that's about it. Others are stuck-on EMCOM only. 73


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: KC4ZGP on September 26, 2017, 07:45:01 PM

Frank,

What's EmCom? Is that some internet thing?

Kraus


Title: RE: reasons some clubs fail.
Post by: W4KYR on September 28, 2017, 05:31:34 AM

Frank,

What's EmCom? Is that some internet thing?

Kraus

EmCom is a 2017 wireless version of the classic intercom used in the 1970's to communicate from the kitchen to the basement.



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