eHam

eHam Forums => Emergency Communications => Topic started by: KC0OIS on February 13, 2010, 11:41:50 AM



Title: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC0OIS on February 13, 2010, 11:41:50 AM
For the last several months the site has been down and now it directs you to the server, so does anyone know if is defunct?


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: W5HTW on February 16, 2010, 02:20:26 PM
What is a "national sos radio network?"

Ed


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC0OIS on February 16, 2010, 02:34:54 PM
I just tried the website and it appears to be up although the forums are not there. An overview from the site www.nationalsos.com states;

The "National SOS" public emergency network in which neighborhoods and communities utilize the 100 million low-cost Family Radio Service (FRS) radios they already own.  In addition, 700,000 amateur (ham) radio operators, 70,000 licensed General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) users, and hundreds of thousands of scanner users have been invited to augment the system.  Training is essential to the success of the program.  Statewide and nationwide training drills, and associated public educational materials, are being prepared to help bring the network to life.  For the very latest information, you can click here to visit our discussion forums and here to sign up for our free mailing list.  FRS radios and FRS / GMRS combination radios used strictly under FRS regulations don't require an operator license, can be used by anyone of any age, and are available for as little as $10 - $30 at many retailers and online stores.  Because of their low cost and widespread availability, these radios can be part of every home's emergency kit (flashlight, water, FRS radio, batteries, etc.).


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: N0FPE on February 19, 2010, 04:37:36 AM
I checked this out just to see what it is all about. Looks pretty useless to me. Nothing there. Just some opening pages and "who we are" pages. No real information and no activity. another wannbe site with no real use from a wannbe group with nothing to do.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KB1PMW on March 16, 2010, 11:55:24 AM
I read about this a while back, and it didn't seem to be going to far, BUT I will say that the FRS channel were packed during our local floods of 2005, and again last year. I have FRS 1 programmed into my dual bander to monitor it, but like CB these days not really useful, but some folks do actually try and use it in time of need. Can't hurt to monitor it, ya never know... :)


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: EIRIKR1 on March 16, 2010, 09:22:40 PM
by MRCOFFEE on March 16, 2010       

>:I read about this a while back, and it didn't seem to be going to far, BUT I will say that the FRS channel were packed during our local floods of 2005, and again last year. I have FRS 1 programmed into my dual bander to monitor it, but like CB these days not really useful,
>:but some folks do actually try and use it in time of need. Can't hurt to monitor it, ya never know... :)

     Which is all the site is really trying to accomplish, having hams and others agree that FRS 1 will be the "VHF16" equivalent in the FRS band, and for people to monitor it.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC2UGV on April 14, 2010, 07:19:46 AM
Sadly, it doesn't seem to have moved very far.  I got hooked on this idea during Buffalo's last bad storm.

Lot's of elderly in the neighborhood had no way of letting people know their power/heat/supplies were running low.  Myself, and two others were going door to door, while a third was making runs in her SUV.

I think this was really just an informational campaign: Educate the public to use channel 1, no PL; and educate them how to do it.

Then, augment those individual radios with Amateur ops, and EOC Public Safety Officials.

It's a good idea, I still think, but the creator took quite the beating about it here on eham, people kvetching about not wanting to give up their ham radios for FRS radios, and others kvetching about making people mode their radios for the FRS frequencies.

Of course, neither of these were being proposed, but I think that's what people thought.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: EIRIKR1 on April 14, 2010, 11:34:10 AM
that, and the usual "if we give them one channel today, then it will be another tomorrow, and next thing you know, it will be the Emergency Radio Service" crap.

Like designating CB 9 caused the CB service to be totally taken over by public safety. ::eyeroll::


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC0SHZ on April 14, 2010, 02:51:36 PM
Have to agree.  The future of amateur radio emergency service is to stop trying to be comms for the cops and start being comms for your family and neighbors.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC0SHZ on April 14, 2010, 02:55:04 PM
One last thought.  The FRS idea is only good in areas where the distance between craptastic FRS radio and a real antenna is less than 1/4 mile.

Seriously, we did the FRS plan (channel 1 no PL tone) with a bike ride in the Platte valley (very flat stretch of ground about 10 miles wide and 500 miles long).  Even with no trees or buildings, you could barely hear the callers unless you were within visual range of them.

If this is going to be the plan, you will need to work on getting better antennas into these crappytalkies.  I would not want to rely on them in any emergency setting.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC0OIS on April 14, 2010, 07:19:24 PM
I expected alot of put downs from hams about frs when I posted this so kudos to you guys for not slamming me (except for one).


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC2UGV on April 30, 2010, 09:51:27 AM
One last thought.  The FRS idea is only good in areas where the distance between craptastic FRS radio and a real antenna is less than 1/4 mile.

Seriously, we did the FRS plan (channel 1 no PL tone) with a bike ride in the Platte valley (very flat stretch of ground about 10 miles wide and 500 miles long).  Even with no trees or buildings, you could barely hear the callers unless you were within visual range of them.

If this is going to be the plan, you will need to work on getting better antennas into these crappytalkies.  I would not want to rely on them in any emergency setting.

That's really all it was.  FRS to keep neighbors in touch with neighbors.  And you'll never get better antennas on those radios.  The FCC pretty much nailed them down (Ratshack came up with one work-around).

I'm surprised you didn't have better luck with the radios on your bike ride.  I use FRS for car-to-car comms on road trips, and they work fine, even at 1/2 mile separation.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: K1CJS on May 01, 2010, 06:35:22 PM
Have to agree.  The future of amateur radio emergency service is to stop trying to be comms for the cops and start being comms for your family and neighbors.

I also agree with this.  The way the emergency communications mindset is these days is dangerously close to whackerism.  We don't need that, not at all.  Concentrate on the civilian side of emcom and you'll be way better off.


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KB8JNE on November 01, 2010, 03:27:42 PM
I own many FRS radios, one CB HT with WX (NOAA) built in and naturally, my portable ham gear and batteries.  FRS comes in handy for making my short films and other non Ham / Emergency stuff, even letting the kids play with them out back but, any communication is better than no communication as long as folks have a rally point.  We have multiple cars in the family but if we don't have a rally point, we won;t know where to look for each other in case of a true disaster.

CB CH 9 was a good start and pretty much everyone in the US still avoids CH 9.  It is still monitored regularly by the OSP and other law enforcement officials here in Ohio.  If we want to designate CH 1 FRS as a radio rally point, that's a good thing.  If it gets a little choked in time of emergency, triage and move non-critical linked messages off to adjacent channels then back to monitor CH1 for real emergency traffic.

We had only one serious power outage in my area, far western edge of Hilliard, Ohio last winter and while we are not really remote, for a shut-in or aged person with little mobility, FRS radios could have been a good way of letting us know they need help.  I tend to monitor all sorts of frequencies so I'll add that to my list although all FRS and GMRS freqs as well as 121.5 (Air EME) and CH16 Marine, etc are in all my Ham rigs memories.  Designating a channel on a commonly used radio transceiver, especially one so common just means there are that many more of us able to help by listening.  I'm all for it.  I take on a more serious level of responsibility as I also own a fairly new Jeep and keep it ready for small emergencies too.  I want to be available to help myself, my family and others.

Sean
KB8JNE


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: KC8OYE on January 22, 2011, 09:55:32 PM
FRS is pretty rough... GMRS and MURS seem to be better options.. but IIRC GMRS requires a license  to use.  MURS is sort of like a VHF CB basicly.


MURS is the old business band freq's.. 154.600 and 154.570 are the two that 'wide band' operations are allowed in, maximum transmitter output of 2w.  there are i think two or four more freqs below those, but the bandwidth restrictions are tighter. both of my mobile radios are Motorola MaxTrac 300's, and my HT is part 90 approved as well, so I have the freq in all my radios :)  I don't transmit on MURS with the mobile since I exceed the power ratings just a little bit (25w lol)  and I have the HT programmed for low power to stay legal .

my buddy and I like the MURS freq's because we can be a bit more liberal with our conversations off the ham bands ;)


Title: RE: National sos radio network gone?
Post by: LA9XSA on January 24, 2011, 09:29:16 AM
Have to agree.  The future of amateur radio emergency service is to stop trying to be comms for the cops and start being comms for your family and neighbors.
The way I think, is that we are back-up comms for both family and neighbors, and for the cops and fire fighters. And in an emergency situation, being comms for one means being comms for the other - as in aunt Melba needs to go to the hospital, so you need to call an ambulance but the phones aren't working.