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eHam Forums => CW => Topic started by: KC0IOX on December 24, 2001, 12:39:47 AM



Title: Music and CW
Post by: KC0IOX on December 24, 2001, 12:39:47 AM
Greetings!  In reading a couple of the other threads, I noticed that a couple of comments compared mastering CW to mastering a musical instrument.  This interests me, as I am by trade a music teacher.  I see a lot of parallels to learning CW and music, and I find the entire subject to be fascinating.  My question is this: How many of you CW ops out there are musicians?  Have you had any musical experience?  Do you still play an instrument or sing?  I'm just curious, because I believe that both skills do originate in the same part of the brain.  What are your thoughts?  Musically yours,
Eric
KC0IOX


Title: Music and CW
Post by: N5XM on December 24, 2001, 01:51:07 PM
Eric, I want to thank you for putting this up, because both subjects are very near and dear to my heart.  This may be a little long, so bear with me. I think it is easily possible that someone who has never played an instrument in their life can be an excellent CW op, but it makes perfect sense to me that someone with musical ability has an easier path to becoming a superior CW operator, or at least sounding like one. Some folks have what we call a "tin ear", and while CW doesn't change pitch like melody does, there is definite phrasing, tempo, rhythm, and timing in doing good CW, and I think anyone who's been on the bands will tell you in a NY minute that there are all kinds of fists out there, some good, others not so good, some terrible, and some great. A lot of anything is how willing someone is to put in the time in getting good at doing whatever they want to do.  It's a no-brainer that if you practice something you're gonna be better at it, but I think there's more to it than that. The best fists I hear have perfect mechanics, but they have a musical quality, a flow that has a lilt about it, almost a meter, if you will, that isn't there with just rote sending of characters.  You can copy it just fine, but it doesn't have the flow that musical CW has. It's easier to follow the thread of this kind of CW, at least for me. I started playing guitar 33 years ago, and have played professionally, although now I just play for fun and to relax. I can sight read enough to get by, but I basically play by ear, and improvisation is my forte. Whatever it is, I wish more folks could hear how they sound, so they would practice a little more.  There is just so much emphasis on copying that we forget that we will be judged by our fists before we are judged by our ears.  


Title: Music and CW
Post by: AA8KS on December 28, 2001, 12:29:41 PM
  I think there is a definite correlation.  I'm a musican.  It made the code much easier to learn because I could learn each new letter as a fragment, the most obvious is "Beethovens Fifth" for V.  Or a circus fanfare "Tah Dah!" for A; a boogie rhythm for C, etc.  Also being a musician helps you develope a "phrase memory" of sorts that is readily applicable to CW.
  Also I have learned from experience that there are at least 4 types of hams that you'd better have a quick pen to copy their code: 1. Ex-military CW ops.  2. Ex-railroad CW ops.  3. Musicians.  4. Contesters. (not necessarily in that order).    


Title: Music and CW
Post by: KD1JT on December 31, 2001, 09:26:12 PM
Been a musician all my life, and still sing and play guitar.  Learning CW was fun, I made 20 wpm Extra code in three months.  CW has always been my only mode on HF (well ... 99.9%), and I didn't own a mic until I'd been a ham for three years ... grin!

While not as apparent with modern electronic keyers, you can tell who has rhythm on a straight key.  My kids could do the "QSO Rap" since they were little tykes ... "UR RST 5NN 5NN QTH" and "BEST BENT WIRE"

73 de Dennis


Title: Music and CW
Post by: AK2A on January 08, 2002, 06:41:28 PM
You are right on the money. Im a working Jazz musician and cw came very easy to me (passed my general at age 11). I knew lots of kids in the high school band that got tickets just as easily. CW is rhythm. Most of us (musicians) think in non-verbal ways, and tone in rhythm is but one. Remember Beethovens 5th as a "V"?


Title: Music and CW
Post by: KC0IOX on January 16, 2002, 12:45:01 AM
Thanks for the nice responses to the post!  I thought I was on to something.  It's nice to see some musicians in ham radio, and the nice responses.  I am a high school band director and trombonist, with an emphasis in jazz studies, and I enjoy all kinds of music, but jazz is my first love.  When you think about it, CW does almost swing in a sense, and I really enjoy a good fist, as it really does have a flow to it, and those QSOs are really easy on the ears.  To me, I think it's in the rhythmic spacing between characters and words, at least thats what I think makes the good fist good.  Anyway, thanks for all the responses, and warmest 73!
Eric


Title: Music and CW
Post by: WK9O on January 16, 2002, 03:15:06 PM
I am a professional guitarist and singer, I am 56 years old and started out in music and ham radio as a teenager. CW is my favorite mode, though I have also used various phone and digital modes.
I can remember tapping out CW with drum sticks on a practice pad. I think that my musical abilities made the code more accessible.
CU on the bands, or in one.. HI


Title: Music and CW
Post by: N3WSH on March 07, 2002, 10:30:45 AM
Yet another voice in the chorus! I learned CW very quickly and easily at age 16, and a large part of my attraction to ham radio is the "music" of cw. I began with piano lessons when young, but it didn't last. Took some lessons on the string bass and french horn in high school, but no luck there, either. I did learn to play the guitar a bit, though, on my own, during high school. In the 70's I began morris dancing, a folk tradition from England, which led me to learn to play the pennywhistle, a very simple and beautiful-sounding pipe, which was the first instrument I could play "real" music on. In the 80's, I took up the fiddle, which I've learned and stayed with, playing for contradances and such...traditional, old-time, Irish, Swedish, Quebecois and such like. I was also in the chorus in middle school, and still like to sing. My wife (who plays the mandolin) and I go to sing sacred harp sometimes, when we get the chance.


Title: Music and CW
Post by: KC8RXE on March 24, 2002, 05:04:15 PM
I'm a musician and singer, and have shocked everyone I know by being very slow to pick up CW. I'm very good with pitches and melodies, but rhythms seem to be causing me problems. Anyone have any suggestions?  :-)

James


Title: Music and CW
Post by: N2XE on April 01, 2002, 03:17:39 PM
I'm a pretty crappy musician, guitar and trombone.  Not half bad at CW, picked it up pretty quickly, now at 40wpm.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N0SSS on July 10, 2011, 07:35:38 AM
My telegraph key is a musical instrument, capable of playing a linked-polyrhythm whose superposition possesses the complexity of information.

www.youtube.com/morsemusic

I consciously hammer the key-down 2/4 beat, while my sub-conscious hammers the key-up 2/4 beat.

I had twenty years of combined experience playing violin, piano, guitar, and blues harp prior to playing the straight key. My total practice time required to master the straight key was 8 hours. However, I listened to the code for 2000 hours before attempting the straight key.

Of all the instruments I have played, the telegraph key is dearest to my heart. It is enchanting to weave two rhythms, spinning out threads of thought across space for communication.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K7KBN on July 10, 2011, 08:41:09 AM
Classically-trained percussionist/timpanist.  One-time oboe soloist (see the thread on Morse Code and the Brain).  I never used one skill to complement the other because the rhythms, while sometimes close (e.g. the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony DO sound like a "V"), are not always what they seem (e.g. the downbeat for this great work is a REST.  Nobody plays the downbeat.  This work is a conductor's worst nightmare - at least the first movement.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: NK6Q on July 10, 2011, 02:06:07 PM
the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony DO sound like a "V"), are not always what they seem (e.g. the downbeat for this great work is a REST. 

Huh.  I thought the intro downbeat was an eighth note triplet (one-and two-and three-and four-bah bah bah BAHHH)

Still think a person's code sending skill is better if they have a sense of timing.  Just my two cents.

Bill in Pasadena
(I prefer Symphony #7 anyway)


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K7KBN on July 10, 2011, 05:09:24 PM
the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony DO sound like a "V"), are not always what they seem (e.g. the downbeat for this great work is a REST. 

Huh.  I thought the intro downbeat was an eighth note triplet (one-and two-and three-and four-bah bah bah BAHHH)

Still think a person's code sending skill is better if they have a sense of timing.  Just my two cents.

Bill in Pasadena
(I prefer Symphony #7 anyway)

Hi Bill -

Nope.  In 2/4 time, starts with an eighth rest, then three eighth notes followed by a half note that's fermatafied...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._5_(Beethoven) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._5_(Beethoven)).

I like the 9th - actually MOST of the odd-numbered ones.  The only even-numbered Beethoven symphony I really like is #6.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: NK6Q on July 10, 2011, 05:32:06 PM
Ah yes, I get it.  Like Lawrence Welk: an a one an a two. Wunnerful, wunnerful!

Same here about Symphony #6, although Fantasia ruined it for me.  It's hard for me to hear it without picturing little cartoon nymphs and centaurs scampering around.

Bill in Pasadena
(soaking my feet in the Elysium)


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: AK7V on July 10, 2011, 06:17:11 PM
Former professional orchestral musician here.  Morse isn't music, although the internal rhythm developed in music training (or natural to some) would probably help with timing.

I think a lot of musicians make good CW ops because they know how to practice.  They know that mastery takes time, they have realistic expectations, can be disciplined when doing seemingly monotonous things (scales, Morse practice), and they can detect and appreciate incremental improvement.

Another thing good musicians do is learn to teach themselves.  We determine what methods work best for us (repetition, association, breaking things up, slowing them down... whatever it may be).  Most learning and skill building is done away from the teacher, and the teacher's main goal is to show the student how to identify problems and teach themselves.

Musicians also like to "perform."  In the Morse world, this means getting on the air and giving it a go.  Musicians know they tend to rise to the ability of those around them, so getting on the air and working proficient ops, even if you're not quite there yet, makes you better.  Being able to accept that you will make mistakes, and taking it in stride, speeds up learning in this "immersion on the air" training.

So bottom line, IMO, is that it isn't musical talent that helps someone with Morse.  It's the attitudes and methods of learning skills that musicians have exhibited for years which transfers directly to learning and using Morse.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: PA0BLAH on July 11, 2011, 03:07:01 AM
I have heard the story, often.

K7QO the fastest american  telegrapher, as youngster learning the code because his QSO partner refuses to QRS, which motivates him to become the fastest, hi. He gave a good explanation of the supposed fact mentioned in this topic.

He says that the required tedious longterm exercising that is required for CW is an item of someones personallity and that item is required to perform music and also to perform high speed CW.

Personally I hate music, and I am pretty good in decoding CW just for the reasons AK7V gave. Nowing how tostudy, appreciating small advances taking fall backs..







Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N2EY on July 11, 2011, 05:57:07 AM
AK7V absolutely nailed it. I think one could take his post, change all the "music" references to "Morse", and it would perfectly reflect the truth about learning and using Morse Code.

Even though I am not a musician, I can add one or two small pieces:

Musicians understand that what they do involves a whole set of skills. Performing alone is very different from performing with a group. Hearing one particular part among many, reading music, changing key, following a leader are all different skills too. Playing in front of an audience is different from playing without one.

And a musician can be very good at some things and not so good at others.

Most of all, musicians recognize that being really good requires lots of learning and practice for 99% of people. And that the reason it may look easy is because someone has put in enough practice to really develop the skills.

73 de Jim, N2EY


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: AK7V on July 11, 2011, 08:51:27 AM
Something I forgot to mention explicitly that I think is crucial when learning Morse... Musicians learn to immediately "let go" of mistakes.  If you play a wrong note, you don't make a face, dwell on it, think about what you did wrong -- you immediately "let go" and continue with the performance.  When learning to copy Morse, you need to do the same thing.  If you miss a letter or word, "let it go" and concentrate on the next one.  If you think about it past errors, you'll miss what's coming next, and that will snowball into frustration.

This is not a natural procedure for most people.  It takes practice.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N2EY on July 11, 2011, 10:01:01 AM
Musicians learn to immediately "let go" of mistakes.

Excellent point! And not just their own mistakes.

I've seen this in action in musical theatre rehearsals. Actor dropped a line or a whole verse in a song, and the musicians covered it on-the-fly. And did it so well that only those who knew the show already recognized what had happened.

People often refer to such things as "talent", and talent is certainly a factor. But as you say, there's a lot of learning and practice involved.

73 es TNX de Jim, N2EY


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: WB6UBK on July 22, 2011, 07:20:37 PM
I can't carry a tune in a dump truck. But I love cw and I have had many compliments on my fist, both bug and straight key. Go figure.

 73 de wb6ubk


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K8AXW on July 22, 2011, 09:41:44 PM
Well.... after reading all of these posts I find that I'm different.  I've found that code is sort of an action/reaction thing.  If anything, it's closer to shooting a gun than playing music.

For example, your brain hears a sound, your fingers react.  Of if you head copy... you hear a sound....which a CW character is....nothing but a specific sound, you 'see' a word forming.

Same with shooting.  As the gun sights line up on a target the finger automatically applies the final  few ounces of pressure.  Actually, there is a shooting sport call "Reaction Shooting" where the shooter simply reacts to a fast changing target situation.

No doubt this discussion will continue through time and you musicians might be right.  But as one who was trained for 6 months, 44 hours a week by the military and has been a ham for 55 years using CW..... I have to vote for "action/reaction."

BTW, I have no musical talent at all..... I don't know one complete song!


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N5MAV on July 25, 2011, 08:15:33 AM
AK7V is right on the money!  I'm a bass guitarist and the last three years of my part-time career have been the most intense.  With more stage and studio time than I've ever experienced, I'm seeing new things happen.  I'm EXTREMELY visual and memorized scales and chords by pattern.  With more playing I'm better able to hear pitch and tone and my playing has stepped up.  My practice sessions are short and focused when learning new pieces.  I stay sharp on the set list by listening while driving, etc.

I've studied code for about a month and had my first QSO this weekend at a blazing 5wpm or so.  I focus on hearing letters but when I'm on the air I still see the patterns when the code is coming too fast or I hit a blank.  On-air jitters doesn't help.  My training involves getting on the air to lose the nerves and learning to write letters by sound.

The shooting correlation has some merit, too.  Sometimes the code passes from my ears through my pencil without my noticing.  That works well until I hit a character that I have to "visually" work out.  Smooth is fast, fast is accurate.

I started with G4FON and also use lcwo.net.  I started listening on the air as much as possible because, like musicians, CW operatiors have their own sound and it's tough to understand when you're used to one or two sources.

Just for kicks, here are some of my musical sound-alikes:

L: The turnaround in "Rocky Mountain Way"
Q: Main riff in "Alligator" by The Foxboro Hot Tubs (Green Day)
Y: Wildflower by The Cult


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: AK4KZ on July 25, 2011, 08:31:39 AM
Y: Wildflower by The Cult

I'm never going to be able to hear that song that same again :-)

73,
Chris / AK4KZ


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: NK6Q on July 25, 2011, 10:49:28 AM

Just for kicks, here are some of my musical sound-alikes:

L: The turnaround in "Rocky Mountain Way"


Makes sense; Joe Walsh is a ham.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K8AXW on July 26, 2011, 10:37:48 AM
I've continued to read the comments on this forum and as I did, it took me back many years when I was in a class of 35-40 students learning code. 

After switching from pencil to the mill and if everyone was on the same speed tape, it did indeed sound like 'music!"

It sounded exactly like Riverdance! LOL  However, back then we didn't know what Riverdance was.... or it simply didn't exist.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K7GLM on July 27, 2011, 12:24:25 PM
Same here about Symphony #6, although Fantasia ruined it for me.  It's hard for me to hear it without picturing little cartoon nymphs and centaurs scampering around.

And if you're truly cultured, you can hear the William Tell Overture and NOT think of The Lone Ranger.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KJ4DHI on August 05, 2011, 12:25:46 AM
I bet you could find Joe Walsh out there on CW, and as far as musicians go, they don't come much better. Now that's a QSL I'd love to have on the wall.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: DAVER on August 13, 2011, 08:50:52 AM
As a lifelong amateur musician it did seam pretty simple to pick up sending cw anyhow. I've only ever used a paddle and keyer keep in mind. I specifically wanted to use a paddle to learn just b/c the muscle memory was already there from playing guitar. I'm not a drummer, but it seams like the diddle and para-diddle system also correlates to cw. I found it fun using letters as the rhythmic base for phrases on the guitar while improvising. Not sure that helps CW at all but it can make for some fun improv.

Dave, KD2AKC


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KU5Q on August 17, 2011, 12:04:49 PM
AK7V is right on the money!  I'm a bass guitarist and the last three years of my part-time career have been the most intense.  With more stage and studio time than I've ever experienced, I'm seeing new things happen.  I'm EXTREMELY visual and memorized scales and chords by pattern.  With more playing I'm better able to hear pitch and tone and my playing has stepped up.  My practice sessions are short and focused when learning new pieces.  I stay sharp on the set list by listening while driving, etc.

Got any You Tube clips up of ur playing we can view?


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KF7LCE on August 17, 2011, 08:49:27 PM
How about YYZ by Rush? The intro is in Morse Code!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nmOMo4OPi4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nmOMo4OPi4)


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KC6ZBE on August 30, 2011, 09:30:21 PM
Dont forget Roger Waters album "Radio K.A.O.S." is chalk full of code......

Not a musician but I love music....Brother took up the guitar really well....I took up CW....We both learned our "tools" at a young age, though....

Dave
KC6ZBE


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KQ6Q on August 31, 2011, 12:35:02 PM
got my ham license the same year I started playing clarinet and sax, and still active with all 3. Started as a Novice with CW, still enjoy it. Have played various sizes clarinet and sax in swing bands, pit orchestra, quartets, and concert bands. Currently with www.placentiaband.org


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KM6CQ on September 03, 2011, 04:42:53 PM
I find that CW is similar to bluegrass. A lot of tunes run around 180 BPM's which is like sending code.
I think playing helps my code sending and sending helps my playing. Here are a couple reasons for this.
First, God has blessed us with bluegrass music strait from heaven. CW op's and Bluegrass musicians are part of the chosen few. (well it sounds good)
Secondly, sending perfectly timed characters and spacing is much like playing very quickly.
This requires muscle memory in your fingers, agility, dexterity and the many strange demands we put on our fingers to form unnatural positions and movements,
and the feel of the timing are part of the same skill set needed to do both.
Also there is the practicing it takes to accomplish these task. If you can play a song 500 times perfectly then you can say you have mastered that song.
If you can perform 500 flawless CW QSO's you could say you have mastered CW as well.
CW and Music also share this concept. Perfect practice makes perfect CW, music.
There is continual learning and improvement for both. We are all at a given level and can get better at it. You get out of it what you put into it.
Just as no one is tone deaf, (every one of you can hear the difference between 600 and 700 Hz) no one is without talent for CW and music. We all have a different degree of it within us. Hard work will take you a lot farther then some who appears to be gifted and does not work hard at it. We can all drive, but not all of us can run a 1.5 mile oval track at over 200 mph. I think those boys practice every chance they get right up to their gig (race day)
There are some phrases I have to play hundreds and hundreds of times to play them correctly. (I have a patient xyl)
There are times when accomplishing a higher code speed requires months of immersion.  Training is hard work and deeply satisfying when completed
I wish it came easy for me and I could play and operate CW like those who inspire me. There is just no substitute for hard work and experience.
 

So there are some of my thoughts on the subject and I am sure many of you have a lot more.
May God bless our great hobby and music. And thanks to him for his generosity for sharing and equipping us for it.

73,  Dan  KM6CQ



Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: AB2T on September 03, 2011, 11:11:24 PM
I haven't an ear for music or playing instruments.  Actually, I'm slightly hard of hearing in one ear, which makes CW even more challenging.  I have trouble enough understanding what some people say.  I press on for the reasons you state, however.

Something I forgot to mention explicitly that I think is crucial when learning Morse... Musicians learn to immediately "let go" of mistakes.  If you play a wrong note, you don't make a face, dwell on it, think about what you did wrong -- you immediately "let go" and continue with the performance.  When learning to copy Morse, you need to do the same thing.  If you miss a letter or word, "let it go" and concentrate on the next one.  If you think about it past errors, you'll miss what's coming next, and that will snowball into frustration.

This is not a natural procedure for most people.  It takes practice.

This, not sending and receiving, was the worst hurdle for me to overcome when I was starting out.  Heck, even today I'm very self-conscious about my sending.  I don't want to get on the air until it's "perfect".  I even used a CW keyboard for a while, because I didn't want to risk poorly formed characters.  Well, there is no perfection in life.  CW is a humbling avocation.  It's better to spend a good amount of time with the paddles rather than obsess about whether one is "doing it right" or not.

I'll freely admit that I'm a bit liddish.  I still tend to get nervous at the key and send a few extra dits and dahs here and there, etc.  I also get the "snowball effect" on the air, as I lose focus, obsess on what I've done wrong, and then keep tripping over myself. I must remember that most hams are tolerant and willing to help.  

73, Jordan


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KM6CQ on September 05, 2011, 09:18:17 AM
When you are performing on stage, one thing you do is become the greatest actor. When you make mistake you move on like it never happened, no face, no smile. You keep going. Same with CW, the other guy will know you made a mistake just like musicians who are listening. But most likely he will not really care and want you to move on as well.
Every one else thinks you did well except you. You need to disregard the information for the moment. Then revisit it when you are off the air.
When I make a mistake sending, very seldom do I send a string of dits signalling it. I just move on. The other station always knows what is going on and copy's FB
It's just a fun mode to be enjoyed and not a test.

73,   Dan


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K8AXW on September 05, 2011, 09:31:58 AM
When I make a mistake sending, very seldom do I send a string of dits signalling it. I just move on. The other station always knows what is going on and copy's FB
It's just a fun mode to be enjoyed and not a test.

73,   Dan


When I make a mistake I send a double "I".... di-dit, di-dit.  Other sends a string of "E"s. Whatever.  No big deal.

With my old arthritic hands my mistakes are becoming more frequent.  As noted in the quote above, "the other station knows what is going on", "it's just fun" and it's not a test.

If you become obsessive-compulsive with sending CW, it's no longer FUN.  FUN is the name of the game.

When things get too bad, either too many mistakes or painful, I'll switch to a keyboard keyer.  Life moves on.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K7KBN on September 05, 2011, 09:49:46 AM
The only time I ever used the "error" on the ham bands signal was in my early Novice days in late 1959.

The Navy REQUIRED you to use it if you made a mistake, and if you didn't catch it in a plain-language message, the operator on the other end would "break" you and ask for a repeat.  The "error" signal was eight E's.  Not seven.  Not nine.  And not just a string of dits on the bug.  Individual E's. Eight of them.  And with the Security Group on board monitoring and waiting to record grievous procedural mistakes, we knew better than to try shortcuts like only seven E's.

Today on the ham bands, I agree with the "didit didit", or "VE" (didididahdit) if you need to point out an error, such as an address or phone number.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KM6CQ on September 05, 2011, 10:01:06 AM
I think your right Pat. Interesting enough, I find that once in a while I get nervous still. Because missed something or sent something wrong.
I guess it is in our nature to always want to be our best.

73,    Dan


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N5MAV on September 30, 2011, 10:38:32 AM
AK7V is right on the money!  I'm a bass guitarist and the last three years of my part-time career have been the most intense.  With more stage and studio time than I've ever experienced, I'm seeing new things happen.  I'm EXTREMELY visual and memorized scales and chords by pattern.  With more playing I'm better able to hear pitch and tone and my playing has stepped up.  My practice sessions are short and focused when learning new pieces.  I stay sharp on the set list by listening while driving, etc.

Got any You Tube clips up of ur playing we can view?

My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4)  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: W6REH on September 30, 2011, 08:27:28 PM

My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4)  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.
[/quote]

Nice. Brings back memories.


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: N4IAG on October 01, 2011, 09:42:57 AM
My apologies for not checking this thread for so long.  I rarely miss the chance to plug our work:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4483q01HTv4)  This is the most recent with the Cory Yeager Band.  I'm on the viewer's left.

I'm also on some tracks for Loudfinger and Creed Fisher.

That's some good stuff! I like very much. Thanks for the link. :)



Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: K9FV on October 01, 2011, 03:38:45 PM
I can't carry a tune in a dump truck. But I love cw and I have had many compliments on my fist, both bug and straight key. Go figure. 73 de wb6ubk

There are two aspects to musical talent - tone/hearing and rhythm.  It's the rhythm that's so important to CW.  Most musicians have both....  I have neither:(

Good thread - and confirms what I've felt for many years.

73 de Ken H>


Title: RE: Music and CW
Post by: KB9TME on October 04, 2011, 04:31:18 PM
I can't find the article at the moment but I remember reading about research that showed people's brains are structured differently depending on the skills they practice.  A video gamer's brain had enlarged areas dealing with hand eye coordination and reflex,

If you play music your brain has already changed with specialization for detecting tone, rhythm, and sequence.  That's why it's easier for someone who plays music to pick up CW.

If you're learning and can't get it consider that your brain has to shift gears and enlarge areas dealing with recognition, pattern, and coordination to work CW.

The human brain is amazing in how it can adapt.  You just have to give it time to and eventually you'll get it.