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eHam Forums => SWL (Shortwave Listening) => Topic started by: K0OD on December 07, 2011, 08:48:43 AM



Title: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K0OD on December 07, 2011, 08:48:43 AM
Mine was listening to the ham station at the St. George's Medical School during the Grenada invasion in 1983.

Medical student ham: "Our generator outside is nearly out of gas."

U.S. station: "We're getting a report that they're setting up an artillery piece down the road from you."

Medical student ham: "Yes, we know and are debating whether to try to get to the generator."
---------

Also working and listening to WB6MID/8R3 in Jonestown Guyana. That was a year or two before the op became SK.


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: ONAIR on December 07, 2011, 11:46:54 AM
 As a kid I was given one of those electronic hobbyist sets, you know the ones where the components clip in to a sort of peg board.  One of the projects was a one tube SW receiver with coils.  I'll never forget the night that I completed the radio, clipped on a 3 foot antenna wire, and low and behold I heard the words "You are listening to Radio Australia, and here is the news"!!!


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K0OD on December 07, 2011, 11:58:32 AM
Quote
"You are listening to Radio Australia, and here is the news"!!!"

Was that from NY? I built something like that and about all I heard was CHU, the Canadian time signal around 3 mHz! Boring, but I had the most accurate wristwatch in 6th grade.


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: ONAIR on December 07, 2011, 02:19:21 PM
Quote
"You are listening to Radio Australia, and here is the news"!!!"

Was that from NY? I built something like that and about all I heard was CHU, the Canadian time signal around 3 mHz! Boring, but I had the most accurate wristwatch in 6th grade.
   Yep, I was in NYC at the time.  That little receiver kit was just a one tube regen with coils, and it would only pick up the strongest stations on the band.  Of course, back then Radio Moscow was transmitting all over the dial with mega Watts, and the BBC as well as a few other high powered European stations, would come roaring in as well.  After hearing that, I began bugging mom to get me a real SW receiver, and pretty soon after I had the Hallicrafters 120 clone.


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: WA4053SWL on December 07, 2011, 02:31:49 PM
I remember two events, one is the earthquake in Mexico 1985, listen the traffic between stations of the Red Cross in different frequency, and radio amateurs from different countries, the only means of communication at that time for news about family members.
Another event that I like to hear is the US psyops broadcasts,  I've heard three times, first in 1999 in Kosovo, in 2001 on Afghanistan (8700 USB), and finally in Iraq in 2003 (I have confirmation of the first two operations) ;D


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: 2E0OZI on December 07, 2011, 03:18:46 PM
Dunno about exciting, but it was kind of shocking to hear RFI announce that Lady Diana had been in a car crash. At first they said she was in a serious but stable condition...then they said she was dead. I'm no monarchist, but it was a startling thing at the time nontheless.

I heard a bloke on 11.175 on the way to Andrews pass on an increadibly important message..."2 pepperoni and a seafood....."

The first time I heard RFPI in Costa Rica was a big deal.


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K3NRX on December 07, 2011, 06:10:47 PM
For me, it would have to be on the 20 meter band back in early 1991 when the Lituanian Parliament was being overtaken by protesters, who were standing their ground against the Soviet military.....I even recorded the transmissions that I was monitoring and fed KDKA Radio here in Pittsburgh with them over the phone....Also, monitoring Radio Belgrade at the time of the NATO bombings back in 1999....Both of these events sent chills up and down my spine.....

V
KA3NRX

P.S. I wish I could find some audio and/or video of the hams receiving all of the information out of Grenada....I remember that vividly seeing on the TV news where they were in someone's ham shack getting all of the info from the medical school over the radio.....It's one of the things that inspired me to get a license...



Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K0OD on December 07, 2011, 07:15:13 PM
I made a recording of Grenada traffic on one of those old micro cassette tapes. It was so "micro" that I can't find it now. Plus I don't own anything now that can play it.

The Grenada invasion sold a lot of shortwave receivers here in St Louis. Jim White, W0NJB, was a top rated talk-show host on KMOX-AM, our clear channel CBS radio station. He spent a lot of time broadcasting about the Grenada ham connection and gave out the ham band frequencies to monitor.   


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: N8YX on December 08, 2011, 03:18:44 PM
Radio Moscow, 2 or 3 days after it happened:

"There has been an explosion at Chernobyl."

Ya think, Comrade?


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: ONAIR on December 08, 2011, 05:19:38 PM
Radio Moscow, 2 or 3 days after it happened:

"There has been an explosion at Chernobyl."

Ya think, Comrade?
   LOL!  Speaking of Russia, I wonder if anyone on here copied the world's first artificial satellite Sputnik, back in the late '50s?


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K0OD on December 08, 2011, 09:53:26 PM
Sputnik sent one letter in Morse code "L" over and over. As I recall it was on 20.0 MHz. I briefly heard it. I still remember the date it was launched, October 4, 1957. 

The next day our math and science homework doubled! :)


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: K3NRX on December 09, 2011, 07:52:54 AM
Radio Moscow, 2 or 3 days after it happened:

"There has been an explosion at Chernobyl."

Ya think, Comrade?


Sounds like the media here....at least for certain types of stories..... ::). ::).....I remember hearing on the news when Chernobyl happend that a ham in the Ukraine was being received by another ham in the Netherlands.....the Ukranian was pleading for help as "there were hundreds dead and injured."......Won't hear about that on state radio, that's for bloody sure.....



Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: N9LCD on December 09, 2011, 05:50:58 PM
Coast Guard Group San Diego: 01/11/84; 5,692 KHz USB; "Plane Guard with Aircraft 1481.  1481, a HH-3F on patrol over the Pacific, was having trouble and calling San Diego.  Copied 1481 in Chicago but San Diego couldn't copy.  Called the San Diego and got through to the Radio Room and was on the phone with a radio operator when 1481's call came in on the squawk box.  "81" made it in safely without incident.

UDK2 -- Radio Murmansk:  01/02/86; 12,797 KHz;  CW call tape at an indicated speed of 25-27 wpm.  As a card-carrying Polak, I HAD TO try qsl'ing this one just to let them know that somebody might be listening to them!  The Director General of the Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications himself directed my attention to the "Radio Regulations, 1982".       


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: AE6ZW on December 10, 2011, 03:43:38 PM
I used to listen to KUAM 610 kHz Guam when I was living in southern japan of Kyshu island. in 1980's.  also I enjoy listening to Far east Network stations, on shortwaves.


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: JAHAM2BE on December 13, 2011, 04:25:04 AM
Well, it's not the most exciting thing in the world, but I recall listenining intently to WWV sometime in the early 80's to catch the moment they added a leap second, a very rare occurrence. I actually made a recording of it at the time. Ah, the things that will excite a youthful radio addict in a quiet suburban town...


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: KT4NR on December 14, 2011, 07:16:19 AM
Also, monitoring Radio Belgrade at the time of the NATO bombings back in 1999....Both of these events sent chills up and down my spine.....

V
KA3NRX


I can second that. I was in London at school and listening to long wave (Europe has a band below our AM broadcast band that has the same type of programing as AM and SW.) We were listening to Radio Belgrade until it went off the air and then I think  either Deutche Welle or A station from Austria with news. That was an amazing moment. We had 6 people in the dorm room I lived in. There were 3 from NATO Countries (US, Italy, UK), 1 from China, 1 Russian from Latvia and 1 Singaporean. The Chinese and Russian stopped talking to the rest of us for a long time after that night.

There are other stories of that night I will not forget but will save for another forum.

KO1D


Title: RE: Your Most Exciting SWL Event
Post by: KD6KWZ on December 15, 2011, 01:44:48 PM
Not quite SWL, but I was listening to my scanner one night when I lived in So. Calif., & there was a bad Santa Ana windstorm. There was a dispatch of a fire engine to a brush fire by Los Angeles County Fire Dept.'s Valley Division:

Fire Engine 101:"101 at scene, 50 acres of brush, houses threatened. OK Valley, send us everything you've got!"

LACoFD:"Valley is stripped of all units."


My reaction: :o

The was another major fire burning at the time in another part of LA County, so no other units nearby to respond. Whereupon, the LACoFD had to ask other Fire agencies for help. 6 homes were destroyed, and 6 other homes were damaged.

On Chernobyl: Yes, I heard about that one radio report of hundreds of deaths. I know the reactor exploded early Saturday their time, but it was not announced to the world until Sweden had to use Diplomatic channels, after they found elevated radiation at one of their reactors. Sweden said they knew it was not their reactor, so what happened? When the Soviets got back to the Swedes after a number of hours, they said, yes, there's been an accident, then they also asked (in plain English) "Have any ideas how to fight a graphite fire?"

This last part was picked up in international news. Now, I'm not a reactor expert, but I knew enough about them that if the graphite in a reactor was burning, then they were in deep manure at that point. The first official Soviet announcements had very little detail.