eHam

eHam Forums => Emergency Communications => Topic started by: KT0DD on January 09, 2013, 09:28:22 AM



Title: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KT0DD on January 09, 2013, 09:28:22 AM
Hi, I was wondering what other people did as far as storing their go-bag and which is more prefferable...keeping it in the car or at home in a easy access place?

The pros / cons as I see it:

Pro Car...

Always with you and ready to go if kept up.

Con Car...

Possible car break in and theft.

Subject to extreme in - car temperature swings...(especially here in the Rocky Mountains)

Pro home...

More temperature controlled.

More secure from theft.

Con Home...

Not with you if driving around and you are needed to help or need help.

Have to run home and get it if called out in an emergency.


I'm just wondering what others do.

Considerate responses are appreciated.

73.  Todd - KT0DD


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: ONAIR on January 09, 2013, 12:19:04 PM
I keep 2 go-bags, one for the home and the other for the vehicle!


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KB1NXE on January 13, 2013, 08:47:40 AM
How about this idea.  Kept at home and taken with you as the situation warrants,

Yes, I understand certain events are unpredictable.  Most likely, those events are not a run out of work situation.  Most communications emergencies are weather related with some measure (hours to days) of predictibility.  If you're keeping an eye on the weather, you know to expect severe storms and then can take the kit with you.

Solve both issues IMHO...

Jim


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KB2FCV on January 14, 2013, 10:16:13 AM
I would keep something in the car at all times, as you never know when you might get caught in some bad wx unexpectedly. Always keep some basic survival needs in the car. If you need more for something you know you're headed to.. then perhaps keep something additional at the house.


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: K9ZW on January 15, 2013, 09:07:14 AM
My vehicle kit is all about the road and varies by season.  Contents selected to be suitable for the likely seasonal weather and to work about heat/cold extremes.  Includes the stuff to get-home (I could walk from work if I needed to).

Personal kit is also seasonal and in parts.  It lives at home unless there is a pre-alert.

That said these are general kist for my use.  As a Freecom person I'm only doing organized Emcom on an ad hoc basis.

73

Steve
K9ZW


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: W8ATA on January 19, 2013, 07:57:19 AM
My comment on this topic is driven by the real fact that we are not first responders.  We only deploy in community emergencies if requested by public safety authorities. Therefore my vehicle gear is minimal and focused on my sky warn spotter activities. So that sort of limits vehicle gear to my mobile 2M and 440 rigs and rain/snow clothing, maps ,flash lights, etc.

My go bag/kit for general called out ARES duty is the typical bag most of us keep ready at home. No need to list the numerous items. If called out I would deploy from home where I can dress for the weather and grab fresh water and snacks. Just my opinion.

73,
Russ


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KD8GTP on January 22, 2013, 11:26:16 AM
Keeping your go-bag at home is like keeping your strobe light bar, wig-wag flashers and other emergency lighting in your garage.  If you roll up on an accident are you going to run home, grab your go-bag, mount you lightbar on the car roof, hook up the other flashing lights then go back to the scene ?  Your emergency gear, yellow lights, vest, go-bag, etc are your tools. Does a plumber go to work without a wrench ?  Keep what you need in the car, you need to be ready if you roll up on an emergency scene.

Thx
Bart


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KB8VUL on January 23, 2013, 08:39:22 PM
Well, the one issue that faces most hams go kit is the shelf life of Ensure drink for the old farts.  The pack of Depends typically keeps well though, or at least I am told that. 

As far as my bag, I carry the following.

Deodorant, for those that refuse to shower.  Those travel size Right Guards for a buck go along way at Dayton as well.

Air Freshener, for the above mentioned issue.


Can of anti BULLSH1T spray, to shut down the nonsense when the ARES guys start in with the "When all else fails" line of nonsense.  We all know that when the chips are down and so is the power that the last bit of charge in their hamabouts will be far to precious to be wasted on emergency response when they can sit in the comfort of their shack and listen in on the action on their handheld.... It's almost like being right there in the action.

Crayons and coloring books for entertaining the ARES members when the pubic safety agencies send them off to guard an abandoned parking lot to get them out of the way.  (Yep, it happened here in Ohio)

Large Stick.  Used for sending ARES members into the woods on a Snipe hunt when the coloring books get filled up with the poor recreations of abstract paintings (can't honestly expect for them to color inside the lines).

Burlap bag, to go with the stick for snipe hunt.

Video camera, to tape the snipe hunts for uploading to Hamsexy web site and the league for ARES promotional use.

Medication to reduce laughter.  Have you even seen a group of adults in a snipe hunt?  Strapped up with a bandolier of radios.  That is a recipe for some side splitting laughter.

Cell phone, for when the snipe hunt gets out of hand and I need to call for medical assistance.  Of course it will work, if there were a real emergency, the ARES clowns would be home hiding in their basements.

Sun glasses, to reduce the glare from the sticking out bellies and bright orange vests of the ARES clowns.  The orange and green colors tend to hurt my eyes.

Remember ya'll that ham radio saves lives...... because laughter is the best medicine.


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KD8DVR on January 24, 2013, 01:07:05 PM
@VUL:
OK... heard you guys talking about this, so of course, I had to look it up.  Glad I did :)   Funny as hell.  The coloring books are about all the clowns around here can handle.  From what I understand, there may be no one locally on our local Whacker group that has completed any EmComm course.

73 john


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KB8VUL on January 24, 2013, 05:08:07 PM
Keeping your go-bag at home is like keeping your strobe light bar, wig-wag flashers and other emergency lighting in your garage.  Keep what you need in the car, you need to be ready if you roll up on an emergency scene.

Thx
Bart

Hey Bart, if you roll up on a scene, your best course of action is to dial 911 from a phone, inform the dispatcher of the location of the scene and then go about your business.  If it's a car accident, and lives are in imminent danger, then assist to the point that the public safety people get there.

Sitting on the side of the road with your amber lights going is only going to get you or your car hit.
And be aware, the minute that the insurance adjuster finds out that you were sitting in the road some where with your lights going, he's going to laugh and tell you the insurance company ain't paying a cent.  You are not insured as an emergency vehicle and are therefore not covered. 


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: KD8GTP on January 25, 2013, 03:18:47 AM
My reply wasn't serious, I was just pulling these whackers chains a little  ;D


Title: RE: Emergency go-bag storage...
Post by: N6JSX on January 25, 2013, 05:49:13 PM
One big issue with a go-bag is battery storage that can lead to battery acid leakage and a depleted charge. Always keep your alkaline batteries out of the equipment (flashlights/etc) until needed - store in a separate leak proof container. Make yourself an easy battery tester - LED-resistor for quick checks.

But the one thing I found out the hard way is with HT battery packs - very hot cars and very cold winters will zap the charge. So how to keep the HT batteries fully charged ready to go and remain in your car's go-bag is a technical challenge (not an easy off the shelf item to buy).