eHam

eHam Forums => Licensing => Topic started by: WN2C on January 31, 2013, 05:57:07 PM



Title: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on January 31, 2013, 05:57:07 PM
Can anyone tell me what speed code tests I passed for my license class.  Did I pass the 20 wpm or maybe just 5 or none at all?  It seems that the debate over Coded / No code Extras is still raging on and I was curious if some how the info is out there some where.  I know I have held every class license there is (or was).

Rick  wn2c

I know... just wondering if anybody else can tell.


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W4HIJ on January 31, 2013, 07:28:02 PM
It would depend on the year you first upgraded to Extra as to what speed you passed if any and I'm not sure that's public record. It could be.
Michael, W4HIJ


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: KZ1X on January 31, 2013, 07:54:54 PM
Well, when you lived in NJ back in the 1980s, you had a Tech class ticket, which means you passed at least 5 WPM.


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 06:10:26 AM
It would depend on the year you first upgraded to Extra as to what speed you passed if any and I'm not sure that's public record. It could be.
Michael, W4HIJ


I know what code speed I passed when it was required.  Just wondering if any one can tell me which it it was.  This has to do with the No Code Extra debate that still rages on.


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 06:11:42 AM
Well, when you lived in NJ back in the 1980s, you had a Tech class ticket, which means you passed at least 5 WPM.

I did not hold a Tech class when I lived in NJ.


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W3HF on February 01, 2013, 06:59:27 AM
I did not hold a Tech class when I lived in NJ.

According to QRZ's old callsign listing (http://www.qrz.com/db1993/?callsign=k2dlz), K2DLZ was issued (or renewed) to you as a Tech while you lived on Western Ave in Butler NJ in April 1984.

Callsign: K2DLZ    Class: Technician
Name: HARRY W WILLIS  
Effective: 20 Apr 1984  
Expires: 20 Apr 1994  
Address: 20 WESTERN AVE  
City/State: BUTLER NJ 07405  

Since this is from QRZ's 1993 CD, the conclusion is that you were still listed by the FCC as a Tech with a NJ address as of the press date of the CD.

The FCC ULS only shows the Tempe AZ address since 1998, so the gap between 1993 and 1998 can only be filled using paper callbooks. But that would only resolve when you upgraded from Tech and when you moved from NJ to AZ (and anywhere else in between).

So here's what I come up with:

1. The pre-1985 Tech conclusively proves at least 5 wpm.
2. The Extra upgrade doesn't appear until July 2000, so you would NOT have done 20 wpm.
3. The 1998 ULS listing for an Advanced license says you either did 13 wpm or got a medical waiver.
4. Since your upgrade to General (or Advanced) didn't occur until after the medical waivers were available (circa 1990), there is no way to prove from public records whether or not you did 13 wpm.

How'd I do?

Steve
W3HF


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W4HIJ on February 01, 2013, 07:07:22 AM
It would depend on the year you first upgraded to Extra as to what speed you passed if any and I'm not sure that's public record. It could be.
Michael, W4HIJ


I know what code speed I passed when it was required.  Just wondering if any one can tell me which it it was.  This has to do with the No Code Extra debate that still rages on.
I understand. My point was that if someone can look up on what date you passed what element then they could deduce what speed you had to pass.  I was a Technician  who had credit for the General class written but not 13wpm. You used to upgrade from Novice to Technician by passing the General class written exam. When the code speed was lowered to 5wpm overall, I was grandfathered into being a General class simply by presenting my original CSCE at an exam session and paying the fee. If it's possible to look up the date of my upgrade from Tech to General then people would easily be able to deduce that I'm a 5 WPM General. I imagine it is since, someone I had a difference of opinion with on this site found that information out and then used it as a basis to derisively attack me. Ridiculous but true.....
Michael, W4HIJ


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W4HIJ on February 01, 2013, 07:17:40 AM
I did not hold a Tech class when I lived in NJ.

According to QRZ's old callsign listing (http://www.qrz.com/db1993/?callsign=k2dlz), K2DLZ was issued (or renewed) to you as a Tech while you lived on Western Ave in Butler NJ in April 1984.

Callsign: K2DLZ    Class: Technician
Name: HARRY W WILLIS  
Effective: 20 Apr 1984  
Expires: 20 Apr 1994  
Address: 20 WESTERN AVE  
City/State: BUTLER NJ 07405  

Since this is from QRZ's 1993 CD, the conclusion is that you were still listed by the FCC as a Tech with a NJ address as of the press date of the CD.

The FCC ULS only shows the Tempe AZ address since 1998, so the gap between 1993 and 1998 can only be filled using paper callbooks. But that would only resolve when you upgraded from Tech and when you moved from NJ to AZ (and anywhere else in between).

So here's what I come up with:

1. The pre-1985 Tech conclusively proves at least 5 wpm.
2. The Extra upgrade doesn't appear until July 2000, so you would NOT have done 20 wpm.
3. The 1998 ULS listing for an Advanced license says you either did 13 wpm or got a medical waiver.
4. Since your upgrade to General (or Advanced) didn't occur until after the medical waivers were availalbe (circa 1990), there is no way to prove from public records whether or not you did 13 wpm.

How'd I do?

Steve
W3HF
I appears to be entirely possible to deduce what someone had to pass.  I guess this same method could have been used to deduce that I'm a 5WPM General if I had not already told everyone. BTW, I'm by no means an avid CW op but I do it as an occasional change of pace and I could pass 13wpm today if I had to.  But, back when I upgraded to Tech by passing the General written, I was into VHF/UHF experimentation and didn't care about HF all that much so I didn't take the time to pursue increasing my code speed at that point.
Michael, W4HIJ


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 07:50:59 AM
I did not hold a Tech class when I lived in NJ.

According to QRZ's old callsign listing (http://www.qrz.com/db1993/?callsign=k2dlz), K2DLZ was issued (or renewed) to you as a Tech while you lived on Western Ave in Butler NJ in April 1984.

Callsign: K2DLZ    Class: Technician
Name: HARRY W WILLIS  
Effective: 20 Apr 1984  
Expires: 20 Apr 1994  
Address: 20 WESTERN AVE  
City/State: BUTLER NJ 07405  

Since this is from QRZ's 1993 CD, the conclusion is that you were still listed by the FCC as a Tech with a NJ address as of the press date of the CD.

The FCC ULS only shows the Tempe AZ address since 1998, so the gap between 1993 and 1998 can only be filled using paper callbooks. But that would only resolve when you upgraded from Tech and when you moved from NJ to AZ (and anywhere else in between).

So here's what I come up with:

1. The pre-1985 Tech conclusively proves at least 5 wpm.
2. The Extra upgrade doesn't appear until July 2000, so you would NOT have done 20 wpm.
3. The 1998 ULS listing for an Advanced license says you either did 13 wpm or got a medical waiver.
4. Since your upgrade to General (or Advanced) didn't occur until after the medical waivers were available (circa 1990), there is no way to prove from public records whether or not you did 13 wpm.

How'd I do?

Steve
W3HF

Steve, your were close, but no cigar.  This listing is for my Dad who held the call before I did.  I picked it up in 96' after he had passed away.  Steve, how do you know that I didn't pass the 20 wpm and get a csce for that and then have to take the written?  Yes, by the time time it posted the code was no longer necessary...but??  As far as the medical waiver, I did say that I held every license class there was.  And Michael, I agree that there is too much of this "you didn't pass the ___ wpm for your license class so you are not as good as me attitude" going on.
My whole point is that there is no difference whether I passed the code test or not as it only takes away from me (not doing CW) and no one else.  So any more guesses?  Or maybe some where the info is located that can tell the definitive truth. 

Rick  wn2c


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W3HF on February 01, 2013, 08:13:01 AM
Steve, your were close, but no cigar.  This listing is for my Dad who held the call before I did.  I picked it up in 96' after he had passed away.  
Dang, I missed the change in middle initial. Sorry about that; I was rushing.
Steve, how do you know that I didn't pass the 20 wpm and get a csce for that and then have to take the written?  Yes, by the time time it posted the code was no longer necessary...but??  
No one can determine that, which I'm sure is your point. But if that were the case, you really would not have received credit for it with the FCC which is the way I interpreted "what code test did I pass for my license class." If you had just said "what code test did I pass?", you would have been asking a more general question than "what code test did the FCC credit me with?"
As far as the medical waiver, I did say that I held every license class there was.  
As N2EY points out, you could have used the medical waiver for every license class above Tech. So the only thing definitive is the 5 wpm.
 So any more guesses?  Or maybe some where the info is located that can tell the definitive truth.  

Rick  wn2c

The "problem" is that your relevant license transactions occurred before the ULS was tracking things. So I actually can't see using that tool what your call was prior to K2DLZ.

But VanityHQ's Unique Call Lookup comes to the rescue and reveals KC7RKK, which turned into K2DLZ by 1997 while still a Tech (or maybe Tech+). There's no record of a General license there, so it must have been quick. And again, since your upgrade to General/Advanced processed after medical waivers were availalble, we can't tell if you passed 13 wpm or used a medical waiver to skip it.

So my conclusion stands. Only 5 wpm is definitive. 13 wpm may be likely but can't be proved because of medical waivers. The same is true for 20 wpm, though arguably the FCC never credited you with a license that required it.

And for the record, I agree completely with your position.


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 08:43:27 AM
OK, so we all know that I passed a 5 wpm at some time.  Actually that was in 73' or 74' I think when I got my Novice.  Was out for a while and then came back in (re-licensed in 96) w/ kc7rkk.  Then picked up my Dad's call in December 96, first gate for deceased relatives.
So if you can't tell definitively at which speed I passed what wpm for what license, then why in H E double tooth picks is there all this animosity from some of those who did pass the 20 wpm (or at least say they did) code?  What are they trying to prove?  My Extra is better than yours cause I passed the 20 wpm?  I don' think so!! 
OK I'll let my rant go... it just galls me when I see on these threads some of the stuff I read about NO CODE EXTRAS.

Well we do know one thing...every one who has held a Novice class license did pass 5 wpm!! The Tech...not so sure...

Rick  wn2c


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: KG6AF on February 01, 2013, 11:06:38 AM
OK, so we all know that I passed a 5 wpm at some time.  Actually that was in 73' or 74' I think when I got my Novice.  Was out for a while and then came back in (re-licensed in 96) w/ kc7rkk.  Then picked up my Dad's call in December 96, first gate for deceased relatives.
So if you can't tell definitively at which speed I passed what wpm for what license, then why in H E double tooth picks is there all this animosity from some of those who did pass the 20 wpm (or at least say they did) code?  What are they trying to prove?  My Extra is better than yours cause I passed the 20 wpm?  I don' think so!! 
OK I'll let my rant go... it just galls me when I see on these threads some of the stuff I read about NO CODE EXTRAS.

Well we do know one thing...every one who has held a Novice class license did pass 5 wpm!! The Tech...not so sure...

Rick  wn2c

Some hams are going to disrespect codeless Extras no matter how well you argue to the contrary.  As a wise person once said, you can't reason someone out of something they didn't reason themselves into.

Here's something that's puzzled me since the advent of the Internet:  In real life, if we see someone mumbling nonsense on a street corner, we give them a wide berth.  On the Internet, if we find someone mumbling nonsense on a forum, we try to reason with them.  Why waste your time?


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N2EY on February 01, 2013, 12:45:13 PM
So tell me....

what elements did I have to pass?

73 de Jim, N2EY


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N3DF on February 01, 2013, 01:30:21 PM
I knew a bunch of 1960s and 1970s Technicians who didn't know A from B in code.  Knew a bunch of Conditionals who were the same. 


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 06:23:28 PM
Jim, if I am not mistaken you are an O T and as such you passed (most likely) all the elements required from Novice to Extra including the code.

Rick  wn2c


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: W4HIJ on February 01, 2013, 06:36:05 PM
I'm curious how one researches all this stuff. W4HIJ was my Father's call and when he passed away I applied for it. Before that I was N4LCP. I got that call when I upgraded from Novice to Technician because I was entitled to a 1X3 and wanted it. My original call was KA4FVJ. Looking at the ULS, I can find N4LCP and the change to W4HIJ but there seems to be no record anywhere of me ever having held KA4FVJ. I was 15 or 16 years old when first licensed so that would have put the time of issue around 1977 to 1978.
Michael, W4HIJ


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 06:56:42 PM
Michael, try this...VanityHQ's Unique Call Lookup.  And don't thank me, thank Steve W3HF.  However your old call may not have ever been put into any computer system including the FCC's.  I can't find my Novice call any where except for some old call books.

Rick  wn2c


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N9KX on February 01, 2013, 06:56:54 PM
So tell me....

what elements did I have to pass?

73 de Jim, N2EY

Jim -- here you go:

Quote from: N2EY date=October 26, 2011
I got my Novice in 1967 (age 13), Tech and Advanced in 1968 (age 14), and Extra in 1970 (age 16). Would have gotten Extra earlier but for the 2 year [mandatory] wait. Got the Advanced in the summer before I started high school; the Extra in the summer between 10th and 11th grade.

when did the exams become multiple choice and no longer require drawing schematics?


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: WN2C on February 01, 2013, 07:02:33 PM
So tell me....

what elements did I have to pass?

73 de Jim, N2EY

Jim -- here you go:

Quote from: N2EY date=October 26, 2011
I got my Novice in 1967 (age 13), Tech and Advanced in 1968 (age 14), and Extra in 1970 (age 16). Would have gotten Extra earlier but for the 2 year [mandatory] wait. Got the Advanced in the summer before I started high school; the Extra in the summer between 10th and 11th grade.

when did the exams become multiple choice and no longer require drawing schematics?

I am going to take a SWAG at this and say when the volunteer examiner system started.

Rick  wn2c









SWAG = scientific wild ass guess


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N9KX on February 01, 2013, 07:08:30 PM
I believe it ended in the early 1960's.  I know my uncle (and elmer) had been licensed since the 1920's and had an Advanced when I got mine in 1977.  His Advanced was different though in that when he got his there was no Extra class -- Advanced was as high as you could go.  And I believe some Advanced at the time felt it a bit of a slight when the Extra came about but they were expected to upgrade if they wanted to be Extras (even though the theory exams they took were probably more difficult than the Extra exam). In terms of code, the newly minted Extra class did require 20wpm, while i think the old Advanced may have been just 13wpm ... ???


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N3QE on February 02, 2013, 04:57:27 AM
Silly question time. I make several tens of thousands of CW QSO's every year. Speeds from 5 to 40 WPM. Many ragchews include talking about how long ago when we were originally licensed. Nobody ever asks me to certify, with official-like publicly accessible documents, what FCC code tests I passed.

If your licensing history does come up during ragchews, it's probably just because it's a common topic of discussion especially with old-timers but even when I was a Novice at age 10... it was also a common topic of discussion with newbies back then too.

If there are OF Extras demanding to know when and where someone passed their 20WPM test... I betcha it's on 75M phone that they are making those demands :-)


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N9KX on February 02, 2013, 11:56:39 AM
I believe it ended in the early 1960's.  I know my uncle (and elmer) had been licensed since the 1920's and had an Advanced when I got mine in 1977.  His Advanced was different though in that when he got his there was no Extra class -- Advanced was as high as you could go.  And I believe some Advanced at the time felt it a bit of a slight when the Extra came about but they were expected to upgrade if they wanted to be Extras (even though the theory exams they took were probably more difficult than the Extra exam). In terms of code, the newly minted Extra class did require 20wpm, while i think the old Advanced may have been just 13wpm ... ???

looks like i need to remember the old adage: "better to be silent and hide your ignorance than open your mouth and confirm it"  ;D

licensing has changed many times throughout the years:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio_licensing_in_the_United_States#History_of_U.S._amateur_licensing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio_licensing_in_the_United_States#History_of_U.S._amateur_licensing)


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N9KX on February 03, 2013, 12:04:11 PM
so after reading the wikipedia history and then some of the history posted here -- i am confused.  Was the original Class A ever called Extra prior to WWII?  Wiki seems to suggest that  ???  but then i found info here (which i have posted below) which reinforces what i seem to remember about my uncle holding an Advanced:

Here's a short history:

From 1932 until 1951 US amateur radio licensing was pretty simple. There were three license classes (A, B and C) and two levels of license privileges. Class B and Class C had the same requirements and privileges, with Class C being the by-mail version of Class B.
 
In those days all US hams had to pass 10 or 13 wpm Morse Code tests in sending and receiving (the speed changed in 1936) and a written test. Class A required a second, more-advanced written exam plus a year's experience. Class A was not available by mail.

All three of the ABC license classes could use all amateur frequencies at full power. However, to operate voice modes on the ham bands between 2.5 and 25 MHz required a Class A license.

In 1951, after several years of proposals, comments and discussion, the FCC restructured the license classes from three to six. This was done to more adequately serve the Basis and Purposes of the Amateur Radio Service, which were made part of the regulations at the same time. The license classes were:

Novice: (new in 1951) 5 wpm code, basic written test, 1 year nonrenewable term, very limited privileges on a few bands. Meant to be a learner's permit to make it easier for newcomers to get into amateur radio.

Technician: (new in 1951) 5 wpm code, same written test as General/Conditional. 5 year renewable term, all  privileges on 220 and up. Meant to be a special purpose license for those interested in VHF/UHF experimentation.
 
General: Renamed Class B, same requirements and privileges. 

Conditional: Renamed Class C, same requirements and privileges.

Advanced: Renamed Class A, same requirements and privileges. Advanced was closed to new issues after Dec 31 1952. Existing Advanceds would retain full privileges and could renew and modify their licenses.

Extra: (new in 1951) Replacement for the Advanced Clas A as the full-privileges license. 20 wpm code tests and a second written exam even more comprehensive than for the Advanced. Also two years experience as a General, Conditional or Advanced.

General, Advanced and Extra exams were not available by mail.

The ARRL supported the creation of the Novice and Technician licenses, but *opposed* the creation of the Extra, because it raised the bar for full privileges.

When the rules changed, many amateurs rushed to get Advanceds before they were no longer available. But just before the door closed, the FCC did a complete turnaround and gave full privileges to Generals and Conditionals, effective Feb 18 1953.

The result was that while there were six license classes (Novice/Technician/General/Condtional/Advanced/Extra), there were really only three levels of license (Novice/Technician/everybody else).

That state of affairs lasted for only about 15 years before it was changed again, in a process that became known as "incentive licensing".

In the early 1960s there began to be concern that the technical and operating know-how of US hams wasn't what it should be. After the 1953 very few hams went beyond the General/Conditional class, and homebrewing and experimenting seemed to be in decline among amateurs because more and more simply bought factory-made rigs that they didn't really understand very well.

The FCC expressed concern about these trends at the time. It was clear they expected more from US hams.

Proposals were submitted to FCC to change the license structure as an "incentive" for hams to upgrade their knowledge. While the ARRL is often "blamed" for incentive licensing, in reality there were at least ten other proposals submitted to FCC. And the original ARRL proposal was simple: Go back to the system in place until 1953 by reopening the Advanced to new issues and requiring an Advanced or Extra for voice on the bands between 2.5 and 25 MHz.

The discussion went on for five years, and in the end a much more complex plan was put into place. There were subbands-by-license-class, so that no existing amateur was pushed completely off a band or mode where s/he had existing privileges. That's where the patchwork quilt of frequency privileges came from - and it wasn't an ARRL idea at all; it came from other proposals. The new rules went into effect in late 1968 and 1969.

The reasons for incentive licensing aren't "ego-stroking" or "wanting to sell more license manuals". They're far more complex. Here are some:

The trends away from homebrewing and experimenting were driven by the increasing affluence of Americans at the time, and by the increasing complexity and miniaturization of electronics. (The real inflation-adjusted wages of the average American were actually increasing back then.)

There was a definite "activist" mindset in those days, too. One illustration is JFK's famous "Ask not, what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country". More than a few folks asked "what is Amateur Radio doing for our country?" and "how can it do more?".

"Hobby" wasn't going to cut it.

The Cold War and the Space Race were in full swing, and more than a few folks were concerned that the USA was losing ground. The USSR kept getting the firsts in the history of space - first orbital satellite, first human in space, and many others - and the USA wasn't. Many felt that the educational systems of the USA had inadequate emphasis on science and technology, and pushed for more. Amateur Radio, with its connection to self-training, was seen as part of it.

Eventually that "Sputnik fever" cooled off, but not before the rules were changed in the late 1960s.

Since then the license system has had a series of changes:

The Technician license gradually got more privileges,
including Novice HF privileges.

Mid 1970s: Conditional phased out, Novice made renewable and 5 years, experience requirement for Extra eliminated, code sending test waived.

Early 1980s: exams were taken over by the VE system and the Technician effectively became an intermediate step between Novice and General.

1987: Written for Technician and General was split into two parts with both required for General but only one for Tech.

1990: Medical waivers for the 13 and 20 wpm code tests were introduced.

1991: Tech loses its code test.

1994: Tech Plus created to differentiate code-tested Techs, who have some HF privileges.

2000: Novice and Advanced closed to new issues, Tech Plus phased out by renewal as Tech, all license classes requiring code reduced to 5 wpm.

2007: 5 wpm code test eliminated.

73 de Jim, N2EY

also:


Before WW2 the US ham bands were 160, 80, 40, 20, 10, 5, 2-1/2 and 1-1/4 meters. And that was all. The 'phone subbands were narrower than today and 40 was all CW - no phone subband at all.

Before the restructuring of 1951, Class B hams had all CW plus phone on 160, 10, 5, 2-1/2 and 1-1/4. The only things Class B could not do was operate 'phone on 75 or 20 meters.

Class A had all privileges.

There was also Class C, which was the same as Class B (not Class A!) but the exam was by-mail.

And although Class C gave the same privileges and had the same tests as Class B, it came with special requirements. You could only get a Class C if you lived more than a certain distance from an FCC exam point, or were disabled to the point that you couldn't get to an FCC exam session.

But if you moved within the required distance of an FCC exam point, or recovered from the health problem, you had 90 days to appear at an FCC exam session or lose your license.

In addition, the Class C carried no credit towards Class A. If a Class C wanted a Class A license, s/he had to travel to an FCC exam session *and* retake and pass the Class B tests. (Special arrangements were made for disabled hams).

Thanks to N3DF for the correction.

73 de Jim, N2EY 

and:


Consider how the *written* testing has changed over the years.

There was a time, well within the experience of many of today's hams, when the written tests above Novice required you to draw block and schematic diagrams, answer essay questions, do show-your-work calculations, and answer some multiple choice too. The exam Q&A were not published, either. Most hams had taken their tests in FCC-run exam sessions, too. There were no CSCEs, and if you failed a test you had to wait at least 30 days to try again.

The result was that most hams "overlearned" quite a bit, in order to be sure of passing.



Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N2EY on February 11, 2013, 04:39:03 AM
when did the exams become multiple choice and no longer require drawing schematics?

There was no one date on which the changeover happened. It was 20-odd years before the VE system, too.

Here's the history:

From its creation in 1951 onward, the Novice written was always multiple choice.

The General/Conditional/Tech, Advanced, and Extra writtens, and their predecessors, were all "blue book" tests. From the beginning, they consisted of a mix of essay questions, draw-a-diagram questions, show-your-work calculation questions, and some multiple choice. The questions in the License Manuals were similar but not identical to the questions on the actual tests.

In 1960 or '61, FCC announced that they were changing over to all-multiple-choice tests, with the standard answer sheets, #2 pencils, etc. This was for all license classes.

BUT!!

To avoid wasting resources, the changeover would only be made when the old-style test materials ran out at each exam point. Depending on where you went for the exam, and what class of license you went for, there was a period in the early-mid 1960s during which you could encounter either style of test. From what I have been told, this happened rather quickly for the General/Technician/Conditional written, but took several years for the Extra.

When the "incentive licensing" rules first went into effect (1967), new tests were needed, and the old exams had to be discarded. (The reason I say 1967 is because it was in that year that the Advanced was reopened to new issues, and the old Extra test was split into two elements - one for Advanced, the other for Extra. All Extras had to pass both).

73 de jim, N2EY 


Title: RE: Just wondering...
Post by: N5MOA on February 26, 2013, 11:39:56 AM

I know what code speed I passed when it was required.  Just wondering if any one can tell me which it it was.  This has to do with the No Code Extra debate that still rages on.


If you go here   http://www.ae7q.com/  and type in your call, click "look up", then click on the date below "effective date" and scroll to the bottom of that page, it shows your code proficiency as 13 wpm.