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eHam Forums => Propagation => Topic started by: N9KX on February 08, 2014, 09:12:16 PM



Title: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 08, 2014, 09:12:16 PM
I have heard rumors of cycle peaks where 10 meters remains open all day and all night and therefore so crowded it seems like a big contest is going on.  Can anyone speak firsthand of that? Was that true in 1958?  1979? Judging from charts I have seen 1958 looks like it had the best potential.

I was first licensed in 1976, but unfortunately was not active during any cycle peaks prior to the present one...


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: AA4PB on February 09, 2014, 06:43:32 AM
In 1958, 6 Meters was open almost every day. As a kid I had a folded dipole hung from the ceiling of my first-floor bed room in Michigan and I was copying stations in California many afternoons when I got home from school.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 09, 2014, 08:42:08 AM
In 1958, 6 Meters was open almost every day. As a kid I had a folded dipole hung from the ceiling of my first-floor bed room in Michigan and I was copying stations in California many afternoons when I got home from school.

wow, i have never worked 6 meters, but given that is almost twice as high in frequency as 10 meters -- and the fact that you were using an indoor first-floor antenna -- that is impressive!

It sounds like 1958 was the best cycle for hams in terms of muf openings. Can anyone confirm that 10 meters was open all day and all night long? If not firsthand -- what have you heard?


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: KS2G on February 10, 2014, 09:03:44 PM
I have heard rumors of cycle peaks where 10 meters remains open all day and all night and therefore so crowded it seems like a big contest is going on.  Can anyone speak firsthand of that? Was that true in 1958?  1979? Judging from charts I have seen 1958 looks like it had the best potential.

I was first licensed in 1976, but unfortunately was not active during any cycle peaks prior to the present one...

Solar Cycle 19 (peaking in 1958) was the most active in recorded history.
See: http://www.ips.gov.au/Educational/2/3/1

I was first licensed in 1977, shortly after the start of Cycle 21 -- and that one was really good.

But Cycle 22 was even better.

And yes, at the peak of both of those the 20, 15 and 10 meter bands were active both night and day.

Sadly, it's been all down hill since then and if recent prognostications are correct, we're unlikely to see conditions like those again in my lifetime.  :-[


73,
Mel - KS2G

 


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 11, 2014, 02:51:59 AM
thanks for adding your experiences Mel!   i am beginning to think cycle 19 may not be equaled again for centuries...

I did find this: http://www.pulseontech.com/the-extraordinary-solar-cycle-19/ (http://www.pulseontech.com/the-extraordinary-solar-cycle-19/) on what cycle 19 was like, but so far that is all.  Anyone else have any links to share?


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: W4KYR on February 11, 2014, 07:55:58 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F2_propagation

Notable F2 DX receptions

    In 1958, the FM broadcast radio DX record was set by DXer Gordon Simkin in southern California, United States, when he logged a 45 MHz commercial FM station from Korea via trans-Pacific F2 propagation at a distance of 5,000 miles (8,000 km).[citation needed]
   

In October 1979, Anthony Mann (Perth, Western Australia) received 48.25 MHz audio and 51.75 MHz video from the Holme Moss BBC channel B2 television transmitter. This F2 reception is a world record for reception from a BBC 405-line channel B2 transmitter.[1]
   

 During October to December 1979, United Kingdom DXers Roger Bunney (Hampshire), Hugh Cocks (Sussex), Mike Allmark (Leeds), and Ray Davies (Norwich) all received viewable television pictures from Australian channel TVQ 0 Brisbane (46.26 MHz) via multi-hop F2 propagation.[citation needed]
   

 On January 31, 1981, Todd Emslie, Sydney, Australia, received 41.5 MHz channel B1 television audio transmitted from Crystal Palace Transmitter by the BBC's television service, 10,560 miles (16,990 km) away. This BBC B1 reception was also recorded on to audio tape.[2]


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K9HKS on February 13, 2014, 04:01:05 PM
I was licensed in 1957. The yrs of 1958, 1959, were the best for 10 meters.  Kept a regular 10 meter schedule with a friend in South Africa  on AM . Signals were always 59+ . In all my yrs of hamming I have not seen conditions like those days since.  Still enjoy hamming and been active all these yrs!


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 13, 2014, 04:54:54 PM
I was licensed in 1957. The yrs of 1958, 1959, were the best for 10 meters.  Kept a regular 10 meter schedule with a friend in South Africa  on AM . Signals were always 59+ . In all my yrs of hamming I have not seen conditions like those days since.  Still enjoy hamming and been active all these yrs!


thanks, wow you got in at the right time  :D

do you remember what time the band would close or if it would ever stay open all night?


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WD4ELG on February 13, 2014, 05:33:00 PM
I can tell you I was around for the 79 and 90 peaks, not active for the 2000.

I was in Central Calif in 1979 and I have logbooks of running JA stations during the CQ WW DX SSB contents on 10 meters in October of 1979 as late as 11 PM local time.  I had a low dipole and 100 watts.

Two things I had going for me:
1. I was within sight of the ocean about 3 miles away.  I was elevated above the ocean about 500 feet on a gradual slope.  PERFECT conditions for prop.
2. As an early teenager, my vocal chords were in that in-between stage and I was sometimes mistaken for a YL (the TS520S signal processer, although adding punch, did not help in this regard).



Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WD4ELG on February 13, 2014, 05:34:19 PM
And in the fall of 1990, NE of Atlanta with the same rig and antenna (and a more masculine voice) I had good 10 meter prop to EU and VK at the same time to at least an hour after sunset.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K0OD on February 13, 2014, 07:53:50 PM
W8JI, on here, said he worked 10 meter DX 24 hours a day long ago.

Personally I remember hearing a strong Thailand station on 10 meters about 25 years ago who said it was 3:00 AM local time there.

I'm guessing ten WAS sometimes open 24 hours a day in tropical latitudes for better stations especially during major contests.  I became active around 1958, but staying up all night was hardly an option for an 8th grader.



Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N4VNV on February 17, 2014, 06:32:09 AM
I don't remember the Solar Cycle number, but from 1972 thru 1980 were amazing years for me on 10M. I could talk to my ham friend in AZ from NC on 5 watts day or night. We had some real marathons. I was running a ground plane up 25 feet at the base. I had 100 watts, but didn't need over 5.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 19, 2014, 02:55:54 AM
I don't remember the Solar Cycle number, but from 1972 thru 1980 were amazing years for me on 10M. I could talk to my ham friend in AZ from NC on 5 watts day or night. We had some real marathons. I was running a ground plane up 25 feet at the base. I had 100 watts, but didn't need over 5.

 ???  I got my novice in Fall 1976 and do not remember ever finding 10 meters open.  15 was open occasionally. I then went largely QRT from late 1977 till 2008.  A solar chart cycle i saw suggested both entry points (1976 and 2008) were not good ones in terms of muf propagation...


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: KS2G on February 19, 2014, 07:26:01 AM
I got my novice in Fall 1976 and do not remember ever finding 10 meters open.  15 was open occasionally. I then went largely QRT from late 1977 till 2008.  A solar chart cycle i saw suggested both entry points (1976 and 2008) were not good ones in terms of muf propagation...

You didn't stay around long enough the first time.
Cycle 21, peaked around 1980.

And the current Cycle 24 (just past its peak) has been well below that previous three.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 19, 2014, 10:53:41 AM

You didn't stay around long enough the first time.
Cycle 21, peaked around 1980.

And the current Cycle 24 (just past its peak) has been well below that previous three.

 ::) ::)  tell me about it.  :'( a case could even be made that my re-entry *caused* the downturn  ;D :D ;) :)


(http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/solar/image/pentflux.gif)



Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WB2WIK on February 21, 2014, 01:48:44 PM
I missed Cycle 19 also (too young) but of course heard a lot about it.

I was licensed for Cycle 20 and those since.

I do recall in Cycle 21 and also in Cycle 23, especially around mid to late November '79 and again in '01, many times when 28 MHz had ionospheric propagation around-the-clock and the band just never closed.  Not only witnessed that, but took part in it and sometimes stayed up all night over a weekend because DX was so good and so strong it seemed a shame to miss any of it, not knowing when that might happen again.

I especially remember the weekend of November 17, 2001:  It's a strong memory because that Saturday early morning I had just completed the installation of beams on my new tower at my new home.  I soldered the connector on the end of the coax to the six meter (50 MHz) beam and plugged it into the station and first thing I heard come out of the speaker was a guy in Spain, just about breaking the speaker -- strong signal...and I'm in Los Angeles. 

I tuned around a bit to hear almost all of Europe banging in, signals from everywhere.  I actually thought I was listening to 20 meters or something and re-checked the rig a few times.

That night (11/17/01) the six meter band literally never closed.  Propagation followed the sun, with eastern Europe and Scandanavia early, followed by western Europe and the north African islands, then Iceland and Greenland, then eastern Canada and New England, etc...until the evening hours when it was hundreds of JAs, followed by Hong Kong, Philippines, the south Pacific islands and VK/ZL...all night long until the earth rotated around so it was daybreak in eastern Europe again, and the cycle repeated.

It was quite something.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 21, 2014, 05:08:43 PM
Thanks for confirming that.  I imagine that occurred with cycle 19 as well.  Maybe cycle 24 will be a strange two-humped camel, or maybe cycle 25 will rival cycle 19.

...one can dream right?  :D


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: W4OEQ on February 24, 2014, 05:53:58 AM
I was a new novice ham in 1954 with a Heathkit AR-3 receiver.  No RF amp stage.  Ten meter AM stations would boom into that RX, especially in the morning hours.  It was fascinating and sold me on the hobby for the rest of my life (now age 73).  73


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K8AXW on February 27, 2014, 07:34:23 AM
I was a new ham stationed in Bavaria, Germany in 1956.  The bands were like CB on Saturday nights!

At that time the sun spot cycle was at or near the highest in recorded history.  I used a Globeking 400b transmitter, an SP-600 receiver and cubical quad antenna on 20m.

This was the AM days of course.  In the evenings I would run phone patches to the states for the troops on post.  Whenever a 500w or higher AM signal came on the frequency the receiver would go from normal background noise to total silence and the speaker would emit a single "ping."  The S-meter would be laying against the maximum scale peg.  It was unreal.

As for ten meters, it was common to work 5w AM mobile stations without a problem.  I never stayed on 10m day and night but did this many times on 20m. 

On 20m I would start picking up east coast stations and start to work phone patches.  As the evening progressed into night the area of the states would move progressively west until I was able to work CA stations and run phone patches to that area.  Then after midnight, the band would start to change back with the signals moving east until just before daylight Germany time, the 20m band would fade out to the states.  The signal strength of the signals as the area moved back east was not as strong as they were when they moved from east to west.

There were times when 20m was as dead as a mackerel and it seemed nobody in the world was on but those times were infrequent. 

Ever since I've always looked for another sun spot cycle like that but it has never happened.  I was looking forward to the present cycle maximum because I figured at 78 it would be my last one.  So much for that thought, but I still have fond memories of 1956.

Al - K8AXW 


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on February 27, 2014, 11:32:15 PM
Hang in there Al, maybe the next cycle will be great and you will be here enjoying it! 
Also, thanks for sharing your experience!


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: W5WSS on March 01, 2014, 06:04:43 AM
Hello I was operating on 10m exclusively during cycle 21 and as I recollect around 12:00 pm noon time The Thais were thundering into Miami, FL  "the Hard stuff" relatively. The beam heading was about 10 degrees for peak signal strength.

Yeah a really global opening around the clock for long periods of time sometime days and weeks continuously involving anybody anywhere.

73


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: VK6IS on March 02, 2014, 04:23:59 AM
1980s were better than 1990s

- was tuning a 'rig with a dummy load & some guy called me, ..
he couldn't believe that there was a dummy load , not a real antennae @ the end ..
- 5000Km contact with no antennae - can't beat that one!.

spoke all over the world on 28Mhz - those were the days.
- all the cycles since then, have not been anywhere as great as those days.
- been told that the '70s were ever better - must have been really good times.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: W8JI on March 02, 2014, 05:03:03 PM
In the year 2000 I was working all around the world on six meters.

It was nothing to work Europeans for a few hours every morning.

Since I like to work 160 and 40 meters, I pray to the Solar Gods for low sunspots. :)


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 03, 2014, 02:54:12 PM
In the year 2000 I was working all around the world on six meters.

It was nothing to work Europeans for a few hours every morning.

Since I like to work 160 and 40 meters, I pray to the Solar Gods for low sunspots. :)

 :D  I have been using a spin-off of that prayer strategy in that i am trying to do all the 10 and 12 meters I can right now and then will get an 80m and possibly 160 meter antenna up once the cycle starts to trough  ;)


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WA2VUY on March 04, 2014, 12:49:23 PM
I can't say I ever heard 10M open for 24 hours, but it was close. One morning, after coming home from a party, I tuned around 10M at 1 a.m. I could hear some weak signals so I swung the antenna around and determined the signals were coming over the South Pole (not long path). I worked 9M2, 9M6, VS6, and 8Q7 in a few minutes. It was pretty amazing. This from NJ.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 09, 2014, 01:20:17 PM
I can't say I ever heard 10M open for 24 hours, but it was close. One morning, after coming home from a party, I tuned around 10M at 1 a.m. I could hear some weak signals so I swung the antenna around and determined the signals were coming over the South Pole (not long path). I worked 9M2, 9M6, VS6, and 8Q7 in a few minutes. It was pretty amazing. This from NJ.

which cycle or year was that?

Found this in an old thread in the 'DX' forum category:

An interesting solar cycle comparison:

http://solen.info/solar/images/comparison_similar_cycles.png

(http://solen.info/solar/images/comparison_similar_cycles.png)

So does this confirm 24 is a solar cycle with a double peak?  Anyone have an updated chart...?


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WA2VUY on March 10, 2014, 05:43:38 PM
That was Cycle 21.

I can't say I ever heard 10M open for 24 hours, but it was close. One morning, after coming home from a party, I tuned around 10M at 1 a.m. I could hear some weak signals so I swung the antenna around and determined the signals were coming over the South Pole (not long path). I worked 9M2, 9M6, VS6, and 8Q7 in a few minutes. It was pretty amazing. This from NJ.

which cycle or year was that?

Found this in an old thread in the 'DX' forum category:

An interesting solar cycle comparison:

http://solen.info/solar/images/comparison_similar_cycles.png

(http://solen.info/solar/images/comparison_similar_cycles.png)

So does this confirm 24 is a solar cycle with a double peak?  Anyone have an updated chart...?


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: PA1ZP on March 12, 2014, 10:41:39 AM
Hi to you all

I worked 1979 on 11 SSB CB.
Worked all around the world with 12W PEP and a vertical.
Worked in 2000 as a ham , all around the world with 20 w PEP and a 5 el monobander.

Worked poratble stations (with a handheld) in Miami.
Worked the US with 1 watt FM
worked mobiles in VK.
It was a super time in both 79-80 as in 1999-2001.

73 Jos


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K9ZF on March 18, 2014, 04:30:17 PM
I was licensed in the fall of 1992.  I made Tech+ shortly there after and I remember working tons of 10 meter contacts during the spring and fall of 1993.

I don't remember it being "open" all night per se, but I can remember working KH6 and JA in the evenings following the sun, and then turning around and working all of the US southeast / southwest via e-skip in the late evenings.  Followed by working EU from early morning to mid afternoon.

All of this with an FT101E, D-104, 100 watts, and an Antron 99 at 45 feet.

At the time I didn't know much about it, but I guess I was catching the tail end of the cycle peak.

I also remember working contests on 10 meters, mobile.  I was using an HTX-100 into a 102" whip on my bumper.  That would have been, what, 25 watts or so?  And I remember RUNNING stations:-)  Of course, I had a few favorite hilltops I would park on...

Gotta love 10 meters.  Now days I spend more time working 6 and 2 weak signal modes, but 10 is always fun.

73 all,
Dan

--
K9ZF
Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Clark County Indiana. EM78el
former K9ZF /R no budget Rover ***QRP-l #1269
Check out the Rover Resource Page at:
<http://www.qsl.net/n9rla>
List Administrator for: InHam+grid-loc+ham-books
Ask me how to join the Indiana Ham Mailing list!


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WD4ELG on March 18, 2014, 05:54:50 PM
OK, it's 2100 local and I am hearing VR2, DU, XZ, VK, ZL on 10 meters.  That's the best it has been since 2001.  I never thought we would make it this far in this weakened cycle.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: ZENKI on March 21, 2014, 03:32:55 PM
10 meters has been open just about every day.  There are no stations around and nobody replies to anyone calling CQ anymore.
Hams seem to prefer sitting on the computer  and complaining about the poor sunspot numbers rather than getting on the air calling CQ.

10 meters has been open for us deep into pacific and many long path openings everyday. There are just no stations around.
I have stacked yagis on 10 meters and  i know the band is open by using a remote receiver. There are 15000 VK's and hundreds of ZL's, but besides the handful
of 5 to 10 stations that I worked everyday nobody else is around. I know the band is open because one moment I can work stations with yagis and work 1 or 2 running a CB vertical that are S7 to S9. The stations with yagis pound in. Thats just how it is. The romance  of working the band like a professional athletes has worn off and hams seem no longer interested in doing DX by calling CQ. I ask other hams at the club about this and they seem to prefer "just listening" Why they dont want to get on the air and call CQ  is beyond me. They all have decent antennas. So hams are killing the hobby themselves by not being active.

There are also a lot of new hams around with expensive transceivers and amplifiers and use just the most appalling antennas in the world. I regularly work stations with Icom 7800's and SPE amplifiers 2kw running a half size G5RV or a CB antenna and an antenna tuner. If this becomes the standard its no wonder the bands sound dead. In past years every ham had a TA33, TH3JNR, HB9CV or some other popular beam. Why are hams so ignorant  when it comes to the station engineering. Antenna space is not the problem its the attitude and technical aptitude thats at fault.

 I work thousands of JA's on 10 meters. They live in the most densely populated cities in the world. Most are running beams on decent towers.  I contrast this to working stations in VK  and ZL. I work stations who are on 10 acres of land running a loaded CB antenna with a antenna tuner. In VK and ZL a low G5RV seems to be the standard and when you look at these stations and the houses that they are living in a 70ft tower with beams would not be a problem. I was trying to work a VK station on 40 meters longpath the other day. He was squeeky and scratchy and very weak. I just managed to exchange reports   and get his callsign. I am running a 3 element  40 meter yagi at a 150 ft. I looked up this station on QRZ. His station consisted of a IC7700, thousands of dollars of ESSB equipment, 2 acres of land and his antennas was some kind of coil loaded CB 0.5 wave vertical with a coil on it. His profile said he uses this antenna on all bands with a tuner.  Why is it a surprise that the bands are dead?  If it was not for the stations who install beams we would conclude that ham radio is finished and there is nobody around anymore.  It seems many  hams have very low aspirations for antennas and their stations

What is also funny I called CQ for 10 minutes not one station came back. Then I changed frequency onto 28490. I started calling CQ, then I heard a few station saying QSY you on the call channel! Say What? Call channel? Yes apparently the VK's have set up a call channel on 28490 and I was told to QSY from their call channel! I asked for a report before leaving, not wanting to upset the CB call channel. The point here was not so much about the call channel.  The point was that  there was propagation and that the band was open. These stations idea of working DX was like 2 meters sitting on a repeater. This is what the VK6 call channel expert told me " i will talk to you after you QSY off the call channel" I politely just ignored  him and left the frequency. Since when  did they start introducing call channels on 10 meters ????

So there it is, hams are not interesting in hamming like hams used to ham in previous cycles. Hamming is more about tuning the PC than calling  CQDX. Hams cant be even bothered to  even try installing decent antennas and then we wonder why the cycle is so poor. The cycle is not poor its the hams who have a poor attitude to the hobby who really need a reality check to  what and how they are doing things. It seems hams when it comes to HF think they can work DX with antennas that are no better than their cell phone antenna in terms of efficiency. Then you have some hams who expect DX to come to them on a special channel, where is ham radio going?

So there it is 10 meters is open, while it is not open 24 hours it is just about is. Look when FT5ZM came on and when there is a contest. WOW, you can hear the whole world 24 hours day. The contest committee must have the switch to turn the ionosphere on or off! If you dont call CQ  you get no activity its that simple. Lack of activity killed 10 meters not the poor sunspot numbers, and many hams have contributed to this syndrome by not being active and using poor equipment. Simple really.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: KY6R on March 21, 2014, 08:09:47 PM
I was born in 1959, so maybe that had something to do with me becoming a ham?  ;D Now at my age - I have sun (age) spots . . . . 

I was active 1973 - 1977 as WA2QHN in Newton, NJ, then college, women, career, family, kids got in the way. Fast forward to 2001 when I got back in the hobby.

I made it to Honor Roll between July 2001 and January 1, 2013, so Cycle 23 and 24 are all I have ever known - propagationally speaking. Back in the 70's I just called CQ and answered CQ's - and also did some CW NTS traffic work.

The only "high" HF band that I have witnessed all night long has been 20M (I think). Can remember anything above that open all night . . .


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 22, 2014, 09:06:06 AM

looks like this was done several years ago with a predicted chart for the current cycle. 

(http://www.zl2al.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Sunspot-Cycles.jpg)

are predictions for sunspot cycles generally quite spotty? (apologies for the bad pun :P ) 
 


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 22, 2014, 09:17:29 AM
If you know someone who would probably have been active in 1958 and can get a scoop on what 6 and 10 meters were like, I would love to hear more firsthand accounts of cycle 19's peak conditions...

March 30, 1958 looks spectacular here:

(http://www.solen.info/solar/history/hist5803_04.gif)


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 22, 2014, 09:30:34 AM
I wonder if there were dates in 1958 when people could watch Channel 2 (54 MHz) television broadcasts from far, far away even after sunset...  ???


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K1DA on March 24, 2014, 08:50:05 AM
In 1940, German tanks in North Africa using a few watts of AM on ten meters were being heard in Scituate, Rhode Island  by a ham with a simple antenna and the relatively deaf receiver availible to him.  The "GVT" established a listening  post there for the duration of the war, thinking it was an outstanding site - they actually took over the amateur's home.  In retrospect it looks like propagation, not the location, was the cause.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on March 24, 2014, 07:30:59 PM
10 meters has been open for us deep into pacific and many long path openings everyday. There are just no stations around.

while it might be easy to point the finger at your post as over-the-top, you may be onto something with this idea that we should point the fingers at ourselves.  Tonight I was listening on 10 meters and HL2DC kept calling CQ with few to zero takers.  I found him not by tuning the band and listening or calling CQ as you suggest, but by looking at a spotting site (DX Heat webpage cluster is awesome https://dxheat.com/dxc/ (https://dxheat.com/dxc/) )  ;)

Now from the look of his antennas on qrz.com, HL2DC has a tremendous station.  I could barely hear him, and though i tried to call many times, he could not hear my little signal.  (yeah i know -- an inverted vee up 40 ft that isn't even cut for 10 meters is pretty pathetic)   :-[  This was 3 hours after sunset here in Indiana. 

i was able to work ZL7AAA on 10m SSB this evening at 01:22 z ...

If condx were this good today with the SFI apparently at about 160, what must they have been like in 1958 when the SFI was at 345?   
:o  :o  :o  :o  :o  :o  :o  :o



Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: WA5VGO on March 28, 2014, 03:59:50 PM
In 1968 and 1969 ten meters was frequently open all night. Not every night or even most nights, but it wasn't unusual to hear DX stations coming in at 30 over S-9 in the wee hours. It seemed like this was particularly true of Australian and New Zeland stations.

Darrell


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N1GMV on April 02, 2014, 01:21:57 PM
Late 70s. I was only a CBr but I remember skip inceased to the point where it was rolling all day all night.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: ZENKI on April 23, 2014, 05:34:19 PM
Its open  theres nobody on. WWV turned on their 25mhz  transmitter recently. They were 20db over S9 at my location.
There was not one ham station on from the USA. Same goes for 10 meters. It was open, everyone was either in bed or on the internet and nobody was calling CQ.

There is just a lack of activity all the openings from past cycles are still there. Not 24 hours day but there is always a path.

When I tune down to the CB silly channel 27.025  and around there I can AM truckers with 5 watts.
When I listen on a remote SDR radio in the USA and call CQ I can hear myself loud and clear.

Hams need to learn the ancient art of calling CQ again like the old days. In the past i would run out of time because I would not have enough time to answer all the CQ's from the USA if I tuned across any band.

What always gets me is that when I get spotted in the USA. I can get stuck on any band for hours. It seems stations get attracted to a pileup like ants too honey. Yet when I take
break and go have a coffee  and then tune up and down the bands I dont hear anyone else who I worked with a huge signal calling CQ. I am not even in a rare country and have pileups like I am in North Korea, thats how starved the ham bands are  for activity when a miserable everyday station comes on.

Really if hams dont want to use the ham bands  what point is there of  having control of a wasteland that is not being  used?

In 1968 and 1969 ten meters was frequently open all night. Not every night or even most nights, but it wasn't unusual to hear DX stations coming in at 30 over S-9 in the wee hours. It seemed like this was particularly true of Australian and New Zeland stations.

Darrell


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N3QE on April 25, 2014, 05:54:31 AM
Its open  theres nobody on. WWV turned on their 25mhz  transmitter recently. They were 20db over S9 at my location.
There was not one ham station on from the USA. Same goes for 10 meters. It was open, everyone was either in bed or on the internet and nobody was calling CQ.

There is just a lack of activity all the openings from past cycles are still there. Not 24 hours day but there is always a path.

It's mostly the spring weather, folks are not in the shack in the cold dark weather, they are outside in warm sunlight.

Lately the high A/K numbers have played havoc with most weekends but there have been some remarkable things I've heard. In the middle of my Wednesday night I was working JA's on 15M no problem. At the exact same time 20M/40M/80M were very nicely open to EU.


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: K4ELO on April 29, 2014, 03:32:41 PM
Not sure, but what I do know is that in 1964 at about 1AM in Hawaii, I checked into the Breakfast net in Chicago on 10 meters as KH6EFO.  They were sure I was a pirate playing a joke on them.  But I really was in Kailua, Hawaii.

73
Wayne
K4ELO


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N9KX on April 30, 2014, 02:42:23 PM
Not sure, but what I do know is that in 1964 at about 1AM in Hawaii, I checked into the Breakfast net in Chicago on 10 meters as KH6EFO.  They were sure I was a pirate playing a joke on them.  But I really was in Kailua, Hawaii.

73
Wayne
K4ELO


that is AWESOME!  thanks for sharing your experience  8)


Title: RE: What was the best cycle and was 10 meters really open all night long?
Post by: N3IK on May 23, 2014, 06:12:02 AM
1958 was amazing!  Running 10 watts on 10 meters cw and am it was possible to work WAC in a single  day.  Using an Eico CB rig that I converted to ten AM worked lot of DX, one memorable QSO was with a Wycliffe Bible translator in Honduras that lasted over an hour.  The output from that Eico was just a little over 1 watt on AM!

We had local six meter net on Thursday evening and it was not unusual to be joined by a DX station, two times that I rcvall a ZL station joining.

It was possible to start at daybreak working EU, then AF and SA and as the sun proceeded west the Pacific dominated  the band. 

Most of us used simple gear and DXCC on ten was easy.  How nice it would be to see that kind of propagation again!!! 

Ike N3IK