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   Home   Help Search  
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 1 
 on: Today at 09:00:12 PM 
Started by EI2HEB - Last post by W6EM
I use Potter Brumfield KUL series "ice cube" latching relays with 10A contacts
in a ladder-style remote switch.  Although, they're a little hard to find at reasonable prices.

The advantage is, once latched, they don't require coil energy.  I use a binary encoded/decoded diode matrix to select which relays for which antennas.  I group reset them when changing antennas.

To accomplish that, a 5-conductor control cable is used.  You could get by with fewer paths if a serial encoder/decoder were used. 14 possible combinations plus reset.

Amazing how many antennas you can control using one run of coax.

 2 
 on: Today at 08:58:03 PM 
Started by K6UJ - Last post by W6UV
What are the expected start/end dates for K1N? Their web site is unclear.

 3 
 on: Today at 08:53:20 PM 
Started by N8XI - Last post by N6PG
As much as I didn't want to, I thought it would be a good "backup" if I exceed my limits with the paddle. I didn't want to have to have the computer out and booted up, so I built the k42. It's awesome. I bought a small PS2 keyboard doesn't take up valuable space. It really is a Swiss Army knife for CW. The kit is well designed with high quality PC Board and parts.
Scott N6PG

 4 
 on: Today at 08:52:20 PM 
Started by N8XI - Last post by KG6AF
KG6AF:  I've read everything I could find on this device but can't find where to buy it.

You can get it from NewEgg:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=2E4-000F-00006

Or from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Generic-Interface-6-5mm-Cable-IC-726/dp/B00IKAA02U/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1422592030&sr=8-3&keywords=6.5mm+port+usb+cw&pebp=1422592034537&peasin=B00IKAA02U

Or from eBay:

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.X6.5mm+port+cw&_nkw=6.5mm+port+cw&_sacat=0


Quote
As I understand it, With this device connected between a USB port on a computer and using CWType software, a person can key a transceiver.  Is this correct?

That's correct.  You plug one end into one of your computer's USB ports and the other end into your transceiver's CW jack.  (I use a Y cable, so I can plug both this device and my straight key into the rig, and use either or both.)  It works with CWType, but also with just about any other CW sending program that uses a serial port's DTR line to key a transceiver.  For example, as WB3CQM mentioned, the N3FJP logger has CW keyboard capability; I can vouch for the fact that the N3FJP logger works with this interface device.

Quote
I've built at least 3 keyboard keyers ..... from very simple ones that the operator had to manually insert the proper spacing between letters and words to better ones that used the space-bar to insert spaces between words and automatic spacing between characters. 

The last two had memories.....one using a meter as a "gas" gauge to monitor memory space used/left and one using a simple LED when the memory was full.

Speed was variable from 5-50wpm on the last two.

Where does this "gizmo" fall into this picture?  Any info you care to send will be appreciated. Sounds like a nice toy to play with, especially now that my hands are becoming difficult to use.  (I either sold or gave away my homebrew keyers.....like an idiot!!

Al - K8AXW

The capabilities of this device depend on the software program you use to drive it.  CWType is fairly full-featured.  It has adjustable speed, dot/dash ratio, and inter-letter spacing; about three dozen programmable macro sequences; the ability to send text files; and beacon mode.  It's a deceptively simple program that has a lot of power. 

 5 
 on: Today at 08:31:53 PM 
Started by KG9SF - Last post by W8JI
I use RG8X jumpers all the time, especially on my test bench where cables have to be flexible. So does Ameritron and others.

That cable just gets warm on ten meters at 2kW carrier, even testing amp after amp. I run 1500 watts on six meters CW through RG8X jumpers, and while it get a little too warm to make me comfortable telling others it is OK, it never gets so warm as to be an issue with failures. I would not, however, use a long run on six or ten because of cable loss.

With low duty cycle, it is generally good at 10 kW peaks or more. I routinely high-pot RG8X cables to 6-8 kV, and the normal breakdown is across the air gap in a UHF fitting, NOT through the dielectric. This means it is heat limited. Heat limited means it is duty cycle limited by I^2 R losses, so it is a skin effect and current limit based on duty cycle and ambient air.

I fully expect the person who said he saw RG8X being used at 2.5 kW carrier with 100% AM to be telling a plausible truth, based on how the cables I have seen test. RG8X will easily handle 2-3 kW with fairly high duty at lower HF, and it does not punch through at several kV, so it should easily handle 10 kW PEP on 75 meters.

RG8X is speced at 2 dB loss per hundred feet on 30 MHz. That is 47% loss in 100 feet. At 2000 watts that is 738 watts of heat in 100 feet. That is 7.38 watts per foot. With a 50% duty that is 3.7 watts per foot heat. That is warm when spread over a foot in open air, but it is not melting on 30 MHz.

On lower HF the loss is around 0.3 dB/100ft. That's 7% per hundred feet. That's 1.75 watts per foot on lower HF at 2.5 kW. Hardly an issue at all at 2.5 kW carrier. 1.75 watts a foot is nothing.

 6 
 on: Today at 08:27:31 PM 
Started by KG0DB - Last post by KS2G
I don't have my cards anymore and don't know if I should be ordering some.

By all means, order some cards.

As an active contest operator and DX'er for many years, the excitement and novelty of receiving  cards for me has long since worn off, and I prefer electronic QSL's via LoTW.

However, there are still lots of hams that send and want to receive paper cards -- particularly DX stations via the bureau.

But also stateside operators -- particularly relatively noobies.

I received three cards from recent contest and ARRL Centennial contacts just within the past week.



 7 
 on: Today at 08:19:05 PM 
Started by N8XI - Last post by K8AXW
KG6AF:  I've read everything I could find on this device but can't find where to buy it.

As I understand it, With this device connected between a USB port on a computer and using CWType software, a person can key a transceiver.  Is this correct?

I've built at least 3 keyboard keyers ..... from very simple ones that the operator had to manually insert the proper spacing between letters and words to better ones that used the space-bar to insert spaces between words and automatic spacing between characters. 

The last two had memories.....one using a meter as a "gas" gauge to monitor memory space used/left and one using a simple LED when the memory was full.

Speed was variable from 5-50wpm on the last two.

Where does this "gizmo" fall into this picture?  Any info you care to send will be appreciated. Sounds like a nice toy to play with, especially now that my hands are becoming difficult to use.  (I either sold or gave away my homebrew keyers.....like an idiot!!

Al - K8AXW

 8 
 on: Today at 08:17:34 PM 
Started by K5GS - Last post by N5PG
Just a note, it's my understanding that the Clublog leaderboard feature is an option the expedition leader can turn on or off, for example IIRC for VU4KV it was OFF. I like to see how other club members are doing because I know their setup etc but if it's OFF that's OK too:)

 9 
 on: Today at 08:06:41 PM 
Started by KD8ROE - Last post by W8JI
No follow up as of yet, over 50% of parts ordered are on 2-4 week back order from Ameritron. Once the parts arrive and we have completed repairs I will post findings.

If the meter is half up it should be easy to trace.

http://www.w8ji.com/al80b.htm     is a good current schematic and layout of the main PC board.

The meter board is in the AL80B manual. The front panel will drop, if you can figure it out, and allow you to test the broad without danger if you run the metering circuits off an external 12V supply. You do not need negative voltage, you do not need to plug the amp into the outlet.

Just apply 12V positive to the center pin of the rear panel 12V jack and it will activate all you need to test through the meter board.

As long as the meter is good and not stuck, my most likely guess would be a bad op-amp ( I think it is an LM324). A bad transistor would pin the meter.  The 3904 for the forward is unlikely. If it shorts, the meter would pin. If it is open, the meter would be at zero. It very very rarely would be anything but shorted and pinning the meter. Op amps can be damaged easily, however, and can fail at about half voltage on the output.  It could be something else, of course, but if it is a bad part is is most likely the op amp.


 10 
 on: Today at 08:01:33 PM 
Started by K6UJ - Last post by N5PG
Anyone notice the callsign on the helicopter in the image posted on DX-World?

HI924, that would be Dominican Republic, interesting.

Henry

And, according to Android app FindShip, AA7JV's boat Electra (MMSI 367302470 ) is in Port Antonio, Jamaica (NE coast).

The usual AIS sites like Marine Traffic etc are hopelessly out of date for some reason Sad

Can try plugging that HI924 into http://flightaware.com/live/findflight when it's daylight and see if it comes up with anything.

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