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Author Topic: I'M SORRY, BUT I HAVE TO VENT!  (Read 36690 times)
K1CJS
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Posts: 6252




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« Reply #60 on: April 08, 2015, 08:17:15 PM »

...You mention the use of screen names rather than call-signs on this website; that wouldn't be necessary if certain poor amateur radio operators, some of whom use this website, didn't spend so much time misusing the information found in the FCC's public database to defame their brothers in the hobby on the Internet, stalk and harass them IRL over silly disputes that an impartial outside observer would be loathe to call pointless because that would be giving them too much credit.

It comes down to the same thing--hams who think they own the bands.  I too had differences with a fellow ham who said in effect that he didn't want me in HIS hobby or for that manner HIS ARRL!  I left three associations because of his shenanigans, and now simply get on the radio once in a while when I can. 

The hams who do such things don't realize that they aren't hurting anyone except themselves.  They might gain a few followers or buy their way into leadership roles in some organizations, but the rest of the ham community see them for what they are--blowhards and bullies that have to have everything their own way--and most other hams won't have very much to do with them.
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W0BTU
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Posts: 2217


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« Reply #61 on: April 08, 2015, 08:48:17 PM »

hams who think they own the bands. 

How about the ones who think they have squatter's rights to a certain frequency? They've been there for 40 years, so it must be theirs. All others, just go away. Too bad if you're using it when they want it.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 6393




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« Reply #62 on: April 08, 2015, 09:20:58 PM »

BTU:  Those you mention and a few others with equally bad habits.  Unfortunately, these seem to be older hams that have developed a badass attitude for some reason or another. 

Then again, since I'm 79 I still have presence of mind to know that I've developed a more narrow minded attitude with many things. 

I try my best to suppress this but occasionally it will leak out.  On the ham bands I go the other way....rather than do battle or exchange hostilities I just turn the dial.  There's too much spectrum and so little time left to be jousting with assholes.

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W5WSS
Member

Posts: 2272




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« Reply #63 on: April 11, 2015, 07:40:59 PM »

Yeah to W0BTU...That has happened to me several times in the past back around 2009 by a relatively new ham.

Yes the same guy several times... Shocked

I was operating hill top mobile on 20m SSB working a pile up to Europe, Africa.

The effort to erect the antenna motivated and moreover of being limited to an indoor antenna from home elevated my desire to exercise my right to use the frequency that I established properly for awhile.

His tactic....break into my operation say hello briefly then announce "let me see if anybody else wants to say hello" of course there was always someone ready to pounce and that particular group would commence to rag chew and away he went.

Pretty clever the first time caught me off guard etc.

My DX and domestic signal reports along with the usual QSB was +20 or higher with the system but this happened allot more times than I would like to have happened but The pre net conversations would root me off the frequency 45 minutes to an hour before net commence time! LOL.

Edit: For a hill top mobile there really is not much room to operate a DX pile up on 20m SSB.

73
« Last Edit: April 11, 2015, 07:48:08 PM by W5WSS » Logged
K2GWK
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Posts: 707


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« Reply #64 on: April 12, 2015, 09:09:34 AM »

I really doubt that making the exams will have any effect on Amateur Radio. If the FCC ever were to make them more difficult, I would like to see current license holders have to pass the test to maintain their license.
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Guy
Lawn Guyland, New York

K2GWK Website
K6CPO
Member

Posts: 405




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« Reply #65 on: April 12, 2015, 02:20:14 PM »

Complaining about other operators seems to be the whine de jour these days...
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KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 5053




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« Reply #66 on: April 12, 2015, 10:30:45 PM »

I really doubt that making the exams will have any effect on Amateur Radio. If the FCC ever were to make them more difficult, I would like to see current license holders have to pass the test to maintain their license.

Making the exams too difficult would just kill the hobby.  This is not like the 1960's when operating a Ham Radio made you feel like you were part of NASA.  Most people have dozens of friends across the globe that they keep in contact with via Facebook and Skype. So a really hard test for something they consider antiquated is going to be a real turn off.

  The idea of re-licensing people would just cut the numbers of existing hams every year and it certainly would not be fair to ask someone who is 80 years old to have to study for an exam they passed before. I get your point, but the older hams do know their stuff and I will defend them just as vigorously as I defend the new hams.  The problem is that a few of the older hams have no idea what a blessing it is to have all these new people. They see it as an easy ride it to their exclusive club while ignoring all the benefits.  In 10 years time when we have exhausted all the wide eyed kids of the 1970's who dreamed of being Ham radio operator and only have left the generation that grew up with video games and PC's the few remaining hams will be begging people to join and I doubt that they will do so even if the exam was an online 10 question test.

If you ever doubt this just look at what is happening in Japan.  The number of hams has dropped almost in half in just the last few years.

73s
Rob
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“A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”  (Mark Twain)
K2GWK
Member

Posts: 707


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« Reply #67 on: April 13, 2015, 05:13:14 AM »

I really doubt that making the exams will have any effect on Amateur Radio. If the FCC ever were to make them more difficult, I would like to see current license holders have to pass the test to maintain their license.

Making the exams too difficult would just kill the hobby.  This is not like the 1960's when operating a Ham Radio made you feel like you were part of NASA.  Most people have dozens of friends across the globe that they keep in contact with via Facebook and Skype. So a really hard test for something they consider antiquated is going to be a real turn off.

  The idea of re-licensing people would just cut the numbers of existing hams every year and it certainly would not be fair to ask someone who is 80 years old to have to study for an exam they passed before. I get your point, but the older hams do know their stuff and I will defend them just as vigorously as I defend the new hams.  The problem is that a few of the older hams have no idea what a blessing it is to have all these new people. They see it as an easy ride it to their exclusive club while ignoring all the benefits.  In 10 years time when we have exhausted all the wide eyed kids of the 1970's who dreamed of being Ham radio operator and only have left the generation that grew up with video games and PC's the few remaining hams will be begging people to join and I doubt that they will do so even if the exam was an online 10 question test.

If you ever doubt this just look at what is happening in Japan.  The number of hams has dropped almost in half in just the last few years.

73s
Rob


Rob,

My point was that it didn't make sense. I was also trying to see how many would change their tune if they would have to retake the harder test to maintain their license.

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Guy
Lawn Guyland, New York

K2GWK Website
WA2ISE
Member

Posts: 1057




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« Reply #68 on: April 13, 2015, 12:25:03 PM »

Complaining about other operators seems to be the whine de jour these days...

I'll have some cheese to go with my whine...   Grin

Quote
(harder tests) we'll no longer have bad behaver? No cursing, no QRMing. No 14.313
14.313 lids existed back when you had to pass the 13 WPM code test to get a license to operate on that frequency...
« Last Edit: April 13, 2015, 12:32:42 PM by WA2ISE » Logged
N7ZAL
Member

Posts: 197


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« Reply #69 on: April 13, 2015, 03:47:44 PM »

I don't remember the 14.313 problem years ago or even hearing about it. However I worked CW...but did tune around.

I'm all for harder exams and making things more challenging than they are today, but it will never happen because money is in the "numbers." Meaning easier exams make for more hams and therefore more ARRL members and more sales of equipment from the manufacturers.

Reality.  Sad
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Later, Bill N7ZAL (ex. WA2DPB, WB3BOC, N2FWS)
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 14361




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« Reply #70 on: April 13, 2015, 05:02:02 PM »

More hams also means more influence with the regulators. Congress hasn't started auctioning off our frequencies - yet.
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Bob  AA4PB
Garrisonville, VA
AC9EX
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #71 on: April 14, 2015, 08:20:28 AM »

Ever since they made it very easy to get a ticket there was been a degradation of the hobby. Many ex CBers are now hams but brought the mindset with it. It is not the same as it was 46 years ago when I started and I fear the future holds even more degradation. I would say that 40 is maybe the least effected band and 20 the worst.
[/quote]

I don't completely agree with this statement, I believe Society as a whole has degraded in the last 46 years, back in the day you could do a deal on a handshake, not so much anymore. I have seen bad behavior on the part of as many OLD TIMERS in the hobby as newbies. We all seem to get more crotchety in our old age, HI HI. I do agree that getting into the hobby is easier today than in days gone by, I also think it was a necessary move on the FCC's part to keep Ham radio in existence. In today's society of instant gratification nobody wants to wait for anything anymore, fast food isn't even fast enough. We all need to be more civil to each other even if we tend to disagree. I consider myself a newbie although am a bordering old fart and sometimes crotchety. I have only been in Amateur radio for 15 years now, it is the greatest hobby in the world! Lets go and have fun!
73 to all
Todd Beay
AC9EX
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WA2ISE
Member

Posts: 1057




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« Reply #72 on: April 14, 2015, 11:00:21 AM »

I think the only real difference between the "good old days" and today is that there are more licensed hams.  Which means that the bands will be more crowded, and thus more accidental QRM happening. And bigger pileups on that rare DX. 

Other things never really change, except technology gives us fancier toys now.  Back when I was in school, people said the schools were bad, not like when they were kids.  Today, my peers say today's schools are bad, not like in our day.  Sure.  And that today's pop music is evil.  They said that about Elvis and the Beatles, what else is new...  Cool
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W1EBB
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #73 on: April 14, 2015, 08:21:42 PM »

I think getting, and keeping, a ham license should be like getting and keeping a concealed carry permit to carry a pistol. You should have to prove your ability to use and maintain your equipment to gain and keep your license.
Years ago when I was a "no-code tech", two higher class hams who should have been elmering me, were always degrading me for not learning code. And they did this to the point that I almost quit ham radio. One day the older ham came to the car dealership I worked at and bought a new car. A week later he brought it back to the service dept where he knew I worked. He then proceeded to lecture me that "real hams" do code, and could I set the AM/FM radio in his car to the local stations!
The other guy constantly hassled me about being "no-code" and wanted to prove to me how a "real ham" makes contacts on the air. He said that I could come watch him work CW at Field Day. I came out to the field day location and found him with a "code reader device" and a keyboard!
Why even bother ? 
Several years ago everybody wanted new people in the hobby to keep it from dying.....now they are crying because the new people don't see things like the old-timers do. Its time to just chill out, police ourselves, and enjoy the amazing things that can be done with ham radio!
And remember that elmering/mentoring a "newbie" is better for everybody than critisizing people and creating hard feelings.
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N0YXB
Member

Posts: 1144




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« Reply #74 on: April 14, 2015, 10:19:58 PM »

Other things never really change, except technology gives us fancier toys now.  Back when I was in school, people said the schools were bad, not like when they were kids.  Today, my peers say today's schools are bad, not like in our day.  Sure.  And that today's pop music is evil.  They said that about Elvis and the Beatles, what else is new...  Cool

I think you are absolutely correct. Each generation seems to lament that we are going to hell in a handbasket.
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