Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Stop a paddle from slipping  (Read 22252 times)
KB2WIG
Member

Posts: 360




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: October 21, 2015, 09:21:21 AM »



This  'stuff' is used in nursing homes to keep plates from sliding around on the table top.  Its trade name is Dycem.

http://www.amazon.com/Dycem-Non-Slip-Roll-Black-feet/dp/B000C221WQ


klc
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1192




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2015, 07:04:24 PM »

I ordered a non-slip pad on eBay that was illustrated by a phone sticking to a vertical part of a dash. Good grief, is this thing sticky! The stuff of nightmares, but it solved my problems best of all and doesn't mar the wood. Cost about $1.50

CU ON CW

Steve
Logged
WS4E
Member

Posts: 339




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2015, 07:44:32 AM »

I have personally found a mousepad under the key works well.  Just make sure it is a fabric type topped one, and not a smooth plastic top. 

The fabric on the top of the mousepad gives enough sticking grip for the paddle/key tio keep it from moving around on the mousepad, and the rubber on the bottom gives plenty of grip to keep the whole thing from moving.
Logged
K8PRG
Member

Posts: 305


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2015, 03:48:12 AM »

Morse Express sells a "Aluminum Key Base", part no. NV-KB2A $17.00
It's got rubber feet on it  and I can't push it across the table top when I try.
Very grippy.
It can be drilled and tapped easily to fit your key.....comes with screws.

Logged
VE3VEE
Member

Posts: 1202




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: December 02, 2015, 08:41:46 AM »


My temporary solution:





My more permanent solution:





 Grin Grin Grin

73 Marvin VE3VEE
Logged
K7EXJ
Member

Posts: 875




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: December 02, 2015, 09:24:40 AM »

Terrific ideas. Although I just bought a Bencher BY-1 off eBay and it's pretty heavy. Trying to get use to it after years of Vibroplex bugs isn't easy, though. But at least it doesn't move when I slap it around.

My 1919 Bug has a nice hole in the base. Now all I need to do is find a good spot to drill a hole in my desktop.

73s de K7EXJ
Craig
Logged

73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1192




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: December 03, 2015, 01:43:24 AM »

Holey Moley!

A few tiny spheroids of plumber's putty works great, no holes, no stains, no pins, no pads.

Logged
N2SR
Member

Posts: 657




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: December 04, 2015, 03:18:54 AM »

Terrific ideas. Although I just bought a Bencher BY-1 off eBay and it's pretty heavy. Trying to get use to it after years of Vibroplex bugs isn't easy, though. But at least it doesn't move when I slap it around.


I think you found your problem.

You should go for more force though.  The same about of force as you use to pull start your lawn mower. 

Logged

If no one is doing it that way, there is a probably a very good reason.
K7EXJ
Member

Posts: 875




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2015, 06:13:05 AM »

I think you found your problem.
Ham radio wasn't so much about finesse when I learned CW in 1956...
Logged

73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
N2SR
Member

Posts: 657




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2015, 07:15:16 AM »

I think you found your problem.
Ham radio wasn't so much about finesse when I learned CW in 1956...

Slamming the straight key down doesn't make someone send faster.


Logged

If no one is doing it that way, there is a probably a very good reason.
VE3VEE
Member

Posts: 1202




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: December 07, 2015, 05:08:28 AM »

I haven't tried this myself (yet), but I think a very neat way of preventing a paddle from moving on the desk would be to attach a neodymium magnet of appropriate size to the underneath of your desk in the area where you want your paddle to be located. Neodymium magnets are approximately 10 times stronger than the ceramic magnets most of us are familiar with. Neodymium magnets can be purchased in online stores, eBay, and even in retail stores. I think a $10 magnet would suffice for this project.

Here's a YouTube video on neodymium magnets. It includes safety tips, too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih-rg6VuJDc

73 Marvin VE3VEE
Logged
K7EXJ
Member

Posts: 875




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: December 07, 2015, 05:41:05 AM »

Here's a YouTube video on neodymium magnets. It includes safety tips, too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih-rg6VuJDc


Wow! That is a very interesting video. It never crossed my mind that there could be dangerous magnets not connected to power sources.

The issues around computers with hard drives (not SSD drives) might be serious, too.

I think I'll just find something sticky. Or drill a hole in the desk. That's actually the "classic" way of securing a bug and time-honored. Many old railroad telegrapher bugs already have holes drilled in the base for just this sort of use. Smiley
Logged

73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1192




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: December 07, 2015, 05:50:47 AM »

Here's a YouTube video on neodymium magnets. It includes safety tips, too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih-rg6VuJDc


Wow! That is a very interesting video. It never crossed my mind that there could be dangerous magnets not connected to power sources.

The issues around computers with hard drives (not SSD drives) might be serious, too.

I think I'll just find something sticky. Or drill a hole in the desk. That's actually the "classic" way of securing a bug and time-honored. Many old railroad telegrapher bugs already have holes drilled in the base for just this sort of use. Smiley


Plumber's putty/aircon line sealer does it all! A 1/4" diameter ball will flatten out to the size of a penny and four will keep any paddle from moving. Doesn't stain the desktop and it can be reused.
Logged
JS6TMW
Member

Posts: 1192




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: March 06, 2017, 03:05:30 AM »

Here's a YouTube video on neodymium magnets. It includes safety tips, too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ih-rg6VuJDc


Wow! That is a very interesting video. It never crossed my mind that there could be dangerous magnets not connected to power sources.

The issues around computers with hard drives (not SSD drives) might be serious, too.

I think I'll just find something sticky. Or drill a hole in the desk. That's actually the "classic" way of securing a bug and time-honored. Many old railroad telegrapher bugs already have holes drilled in the base for just this sort of use. Smiley


Plumber's putty/aircon line sealer does it all! A 1/4" diameter ball will flatten out to the size of a penny and four will keep any paddle from moving. Doesn't stain the desktop and it can be reused.

I started this thread and now I'll end it. All my previous suggestions were for the birds - they either failed to really stop slippage, hardened, or left horrible stains on the wood surface. Here's my final word. carpet anti-slip tape! I had some all along but never thought of using it on the paddle or bug. It's white, about 1-1/2" wide, and like double-back tape except the side that goes down only feels slightly sticky. But, man does it work! Two strips on my lightweight paddle keeps it down like nails, but I can lift it and not leave any stain whatever.

73,
Steve in Okinawa
Logged
KC3RN
Member

Posts: 200




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2017, 03:16:32 AM »

I use rubber shelf liner. It's cheap, effective, and sold everywhere.



That's what I use also.  It works great, is easy to find, and is inexpensive.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!