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   Home   Help Search  
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Author Topic: Linux  (Read 23151 times)
K7EXJ
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2015, 01:10:52 PM »

My earliest exposure to *nix was in the 1980s working for Exxon Shipping. They had Xenix on all their US ships which the REO was supposed to run. Xenix, strangely enough, was a Microsoft product that Bill Gates predicted would "take over the world". As it turns out between the Mach kernel (OS-X), IOS, Android and Linux servers all over the world, he was (for once) right. There might be a few desktops out there too but, frankly, I'm not playing that game.

My first Linux installation was about 1995 with Yggdrasil followed by Slackware, SuSE, Ubuntu, Fedora and (on my ham Linux box) Kubuntu. For servers I use Centos. Since Byte Magazine wondered if Unix was dead, I have started and sold 3 ISPs which all used Linux, and ran a network consulting firm with 5 techs out of our upstairs office (which is now mostly my XYLs quilting room with a little niche for my ham shack).

In all the intervening years I have had only one *nix box cracked: a FreeBSD server used to run an IRC server in the late 90's. I have, right now, Linux boxes acting as file servers, back up servers, web servers, email servers, VPN clients and servers, and a Nagios network monitoring server. Do I have Windows servers running? Sure... but I never let any Windows server have an open inbound port; if they get inbound traffic it's intercepted by a Linux box first and then forwarded.

My consulting business uses Intuit's web-based accounting application which my XYL and I access on Linux (Mint for her... Fedora with xfce for me). I have KDE on the ham shack box. And Centos on our big file server "personal cloud". We have one Windows 7 box in the house that gets fired up once a  year to do taxes using Turbo Tax.

The only complaint I have about Linux is that it's hard to make much money with it. Not many call backs and that bread-and-butter moneymaker for any windows guy: no spyware/virus scans/installs. But I can do remote updates from my recliner in my Spongebob jammies and still send 'em a bill.

But since moving to Raspberry Pi micro-boxen for VPNs I am losing money there; I used to be able to depend on having to reconfigure an OpenVPN circuit a few times a year as hard drives wear out but now that they're all (clients and servers) running a Linux OS on a micro SD card I can't even do that.

This doesn't mean that I only work on Linux. I do a lot of Windows work but I no longer do scanning. Last week I had to clear up a cryptowall infection, restore files, add a remote Exchange email client, and move a user to a new machine and add him to the domain. All painful issues only face with Windows. Next week a half day job updating their accounting software. This summer my liaison at another client moved from Server 2008 and Exchange 2010 to Server 2012 and Exchange 2013. Over their Christmas break we'll be installing new Cisco managed switches with POE for their VOIP phone system and upgrade some wiring to Cat6.

Luckily, my clients love the money I save them. One of them said that she should have an IT budget of $120,000. She told me, with a big smile, that her budget is far less than that. Even with 80 Windows desktops.

She doesn't want me to retire. If I were 25 instead of 72 I think I'd learn Linux.


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73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 605




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« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2015, 01:58:37 PM »

My experience with asking questions on Linux forums was that people seemed to be there to torment me by misunderstanding my question and supplying all sorts of detailed explanations about irrelevant subjects. I was also told how things that turned out to be impossible were easy... I think that Linux forums attract a more intelligent level of trolls actually

Some people still think that Linux is only for engineers, programmers, and wannabes who still live in Mom's basement.  We're talking about serious self-esteem issues here.  They need more psychiatric than technical help, as well as being stuck in 1995.  Fortunately, there aren't very many of those types left.  Most people grow up, get a grip on reality, and get an education & a job. Grin

I suggest LinuxQuestions.org for the best forums.  Most people are very helpful there, and there are very few of the "RTFM" Mommy's basement trolls there.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
KB2HSH
Member

Posts: 275


WWW

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« Reply #47 on: December 14, 2015, 07:29:11 AM »

I am by no means a Linux fanboy/etc.  I have had a "LOVE/HATE" relationship with Linux (in any of the distros I've tried...Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSolaris, PCBSD, Tiny Core, Knoppix...etc etc etc)...but every now and then, I try one out just to see if anything has changed for the better.  I am a PBX tech for a living, and require a Windows environment...even MS-DOS 6.22 is used regularly.  My older Panasonic Toughbook was feeling a bit sluggish lately...more than usual...so I downloaded and deployed Xubuntu 12.04 (the last non-PAE version), and I have to say that other than WSJT crashing upon open (most WSJT packages are rather buggy, Windows included), it has been pretty good.  Fldigi and Xlog are excellent, as is Wine 1.4 for running Oribtron and AGW packet engine.

Hell, even the chess package I installed is pretty good! 

And the Toughbook feels like it did when it was new.  Could I ever ditch Windows completely?  No...the Anritsu software I use requires it, but for playing around on my personal machine at home, it's not bad.

John KB2HSH
Springbrook, NY
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KK4GGL
Member

Posts: 1293




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« Reply #48 on: December 14, 2015, 08:35:55 AM »

and AGW packet engine.

Are the native apps (ie Xastir) able to use AGW when it's being run under WINE?
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73,
Rick KK4GGL
W4CDO
Member

Posts: 23




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« Reply #49 on: December 14, 2015, 05:20:55 PM »

I've read this entire post and found some good information here. I've used Ubuntu 14 for a while, but other than Flidigi, I haven't found very much in the way of ham radio applications. I tried corlog but it looked unattractive to me and didn't seem worth the effort to get it setup. Another issue was finding a printer driver for a Canon inkjet printer I have; just wasn't able to use the printer. I found several office, math, and science applications that I liked very much; but, ham radio software wasn't very good compared to Windows applications. I have a fairly new, somewhat underpowered computer available, so I may install Mint 17 on it and give it another try. Can anyone suggest some good, basic ham radio applications here? As for a printer, should I look for a printer that is known to be supported with Linux drivers?

Jerry W4CDO
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AC7CW
Member

Posts: 1007




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« Reply #50 on: December 14, 2015, 05:36:37 PM »

I have played with Mint a little, very easy to install and use. There is some command line learning curve but not much.

Have not tried the following two but you never know, somebody might like them:
http://skywavelinux.com/ is specific to using online receivers
http://www.shackbox.net/ is specific to amateur radio
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 605




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« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2015, 05:39:07 PM »

As for a printer, should I look for a printer that is known to be supported with Linux drivers?

Two words:  Hewlett Packard.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
W4CDO
Member

Posts: 23




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« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2015, 06:26:53 PM »

Thank you both, I will follow up on your suggestions. I use Win 10 on my shack computer and what I dislike about it is it's burdensome features that use up resources and do things that I don't need. Linux would let me configure my computer for a specific purpose. I have 3 computers (all Win 10)--one in the shack for radio control/logging/digital modes, another dedicated to radio astronomy projects, and the last for general use (non-technical).

Jerry W4CDO
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KK4GGL
Member

Posts: 1293




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« Reply #53 on: December 14, 2015, 07:16:06 PM »

Programs I use:
Chirp - radio programming
CQRLog - logging
XLog - a logger I am looking at
Direwold - software modem/TNC
fldigi
gpredict - satellite prediction
qsstv - slowscan TV
qtel - echolink client
TrustedQSL - LOTW sigining
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73,
Rick KK4GGL
K7EXJ
Member

Posts: 875




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« Reply #54 on: December 14, 2015, 08:20:08 PM »

There is a huge selection of ham radio applications and even hardware (TNC for Raspberry Pi, for instance). This website is Aussie but has applications available for all:

https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2012/crime-in-the-u.s.-2012/tables/8tabledatadecpdf/table-8-state-cuts/table_8_offenses_known_to_law_enforcement_by_illinois_by_city_2012.xls

And this is an entire Ubuntu distribution built around ham radio with lots of choices. Andy's was the first software ham radio distro that I tried and I got FLdigi running quickly. Which only whetted my appetite for more. However, Andy's was somewhat more crippled than other distros so I switched to Kubuntu and, since I had already figured out how to work FLdigi and CAT on my old FT-767GX, it was a breeze to download and install FLdigi on Kubuntu.

Andy's is listed in the link, above, but is direclty downloadable. It is an "image" (ISO) and you can burn it to a DVD (or thumb drive) and run it entirely in RAM if you want. This does not disturb the hard drive on your computer but everything you have configured is lost (except on the thumbdrive if you use that).

http://sourceforge.net/projects/kb1oiq-andysham/

And, finally, Shackbox (http://www.shackbox.net/) is another ham radio oriented Linux distro. I have not played with this one (yet). They say it has more than 150 ham radio applications for Linux. They all get installed when you run the .iso in RAM and if you decide to install it to your HD.

I think Linux embodies the spirit of amateur radio in computer operating systems.
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73s de K7EXJ
Craig Smiley
N0XAX
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #55 on: December 16, 2015, 11:40:07 PM »

I run Mint 17.2 LTS on the home machine and Kali 2.0 on my various laptops. Both are very stable. Kali 2.0 however is the real power house distro.

www.kali.org
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