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Author Topic: elctrical solder-type/name ???  (Read 1620 times)
KC8Y
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Posts: 496




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« on: March 20, 2016, 05:41:15 PM »

I plan on small elect. items for soldering (have Weller pencil & gun irons).

what NAME BRAND & TYPE of SOLDER is good to use Huh

My handicap makes me forget Sad

Ken'KC8Y
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KD1I
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Posts: 404




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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2016, 05:54:47 PM »

Ken, the ol' standby was Kester 60/40 radio solder.    I'm not sure if you can still buy that but here are a few thoughts.   Use only rosin core solder meant for electronics.  Never use acid core as it rots the connections over time.  Be sure to buy an appropriate size for your work, neither too large nor too small a diameter. You should still be able to get lead based solders in the USA and that is what I still use.   .032" is good for fine work on small components. Radio Shack still sells solder as does Fry Electronics. I'm sure you could get it mail order on line also.    Weller is a good name in irons but I would not use a gun type myself. Too heavy and hard to hold for small work.   I prefer a chisel tip to a cone tip...better heat transfer.   OK, that's my 2 cents.   73, Jim
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K8AXW
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Posts: 6574




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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2016, 08:45:11 PM »

Ken:  Jim covered about all the bases.  My only advice is to stay away from an solder Radio Shack sells unless it has the Kester 44 name on it. The size of the solder is 0.031" which will cover most bases.

I have used Radio Shack solder a few times and it really isn't that good.

I've used a 15w pencil soldering iron for decades.....the same one actually.  It came with a correspondence course I took about 50 years ago.  Musta bured off 3ft of tips!

I finally broke down and bought a Hakko soldering station recently.....the cheapest one they sell and immediately fell in love with it.  So if you get to the place where you think you need a better iron, consider the Hakko. 

Anyhow, Kester is still available in the 1lb rolls which will last you a very long time.  Good luck and have fun.  (Oh, the trend these days is to use "lead free solder."  I haven't had any experience with this mix but if you can get the 60/40 leaded type, buy it)

One more tip, whenever you are soldering, avoid breathing the fumes (smoke).  I haven't had a problem with all of the solder I've melted but no point in tempting fate.
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A Pessimist is Never Disappointed!
WA7PRC
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Posts: 1973


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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2016, 11:38:55 PM »

At the world's largest OEM of RF-driven CO2 Lasers, until switching
to RoHs "lead-free" solder, we used Sn63Pb37 solder with a
"No Clean" flux... Kester 245 (link):

"Kester 245 was developed to complement low
residue liquid fluxes being used by the
electronics industry. The chemistry is based
on some of the same principles that have been
safely used for years in mildly activated rosin
fluxes. The use of 245 results in visually
acceptable assemblies without cleaning, yet
soldering quality and efficiency is comparable
to that obtained with mildly activated rosin flux.
245 was formerly classified as Type LR per
MIL-F-14256. 245 is Bellcore GR-78 compliant."


vy 73,
Bryan WA7PRC
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G3RZP
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Posts: 30




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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2016, 12:35:41 AM »

There's good bargains to be had at Dayton generally. I haven't seen Kester, but Billiton and Ersin Multicore are reputable brands. I too stick to old fashioned tin/lead solder for soft soldering and have a lifetime supply in various gauges.

I do need more 'hard' silver solder, but I have no  experience of whether the cadmium free varieties which are all that is now available in Europe - and which don't flow as easily - are that much harder to use. Anybody got any experience?
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VR2AX
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Posts: 832




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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 05:59:10 AM »

Kester 020 or 015 both available from Mouser. Not much different I found 020 very slightly easier to work with with  must use TCSO. Watch the heat.

That works for modern kits well.
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N4CQR
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Posts: 594




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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2016, 06:20:41 AM »

Kester SN63PB37 (#66/44) can be found at Amazon.com.
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KD1I
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Posts: 404




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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2016, 03:07:34 PM »

There you go, Ken.....lots of excellent advice. Now make some solder smoke and have fun.     Don't worry about the lead fumes. Someday someone will prove they are actually good for you. HI.HI.   73, Jim
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