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Author Topic: 70s CB mic with a jones plug? WTH?  (Read 3280 times)
KJ6ZOL
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« on: June 15, 2016, 09:25:36 PM »

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Midland-Model-77-849-500-ohm-Mic-Microphone-/401130178738?hash=item5d6538c8b2:g:J90AAOSwO~hXH-Uq

I was poking around Ebay for a hi-z mic when I came across this odd little number. Old Midland CB mic from the glory days of CB in the 70s. The weird thing is, it apparently has a jones connector on the end, instead of the more common 5 pin connector, or the occasional DIN or 6 pin. I have never heard of a CB that used a jones connector for the mic. Does anybody remember a Midland CB that was so equipped? Other listings for similar Midland mics all have 5 pin plugs.
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N3QE
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2016, 03:58:51 AM »

I don't think that's quite a "Jones connector" although there are some similarities. Like a Jones connector it takes a rectangular grid of rectangular pins, but this midland microphone uses a threaded circular shell with a rectangular grid, and that is an unusual combination for a 70's era consumer CB microphone connector. (Although not unprecedented for the mil-spec style circular connectors. And I think some modern rigs use a rectangular grid in a circular shell. And of course there is the two-pin Jones connector in the unthreaded circular shell, but this midland microphone plugs into a socket that has nearly square pins.)

I think that connector was actually made by HRS (Hirose). This is what the other end looks like:
« Last Edit: June 16, 2016, 04:22:33 AM by N3QE » Logged
ONAIR
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2016, 10:06:09 AM »

Could have been modified by a CBer or Freebander to fit on another rig.  I believe that the 10 meter Uniden HR-2510 radio had a similar connector, and that rig is one of their favorites.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2016, 04:19:19 PM by ONAIR » Logged
KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2016, 01:09:49 PM »

Could have been modified by a CBer or Freebander to fit on another rig.  I believe that the 10 meter Uniden HR-2510 radio had a similar connector, and that rig is one if their favorites.

It looks like the original connector. It's possible that it was an aftermarket mic meant for a freeband rig like the HR-2510. Or Midland could have made a 10/11 meter rig and used that connector on it since the freebanders would be familiar with it. From what I know, the FCC didn't have strict prohibitions against freeband or modifiable 10m rigs 40 years ago-look at the Siltronix Comanche which had 200w input and could be modded to work on 11m. The rules said that CB's were limited to 5w input, but apparently the rule wasn't strictly enforced like it is today. And even today, people buy "10m" rigs from China over the internet, ship them in via the mail, then flip them on Craigslist with instructions on 11m modding included. Just yesterday a freeband rig popped up on SF CL.
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K7MEM
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2016, 02:48:30 PM »

Could have been modified by a CBer or Freebander to fit on another rig.  I believe that the 10 meter Uniden HR-2510 radio had a similar connector, and that rig is one if their favorites.

It looks like the original connector. It's possible that it was an aftermarket mic meant for a freeband rig like the HR-2510. Or Midland could have made a 10/11 meter rig and used that connector on it since the freebanders would be familiar with it. From what I know, the FCC didn't have strict prohibitions against freeband or modifiable 10m rigs 40 years ago-look at the Siltronix Comanche which had 200w input and could be modded to work on 11m. The rules said that CB's were limited to 5w input, but apparently the rule wasn't strictly enforced like it is today. And even today, people buy "10m" rigs from China over the internet, ship them in via the mail, then flip them on Craigslist with instructions on 11m modding included. Just yesterday a freeband rig popped up on SF CL.

No, the HR-2510 didn't have that kind of connector. The HR-2510 had a 5-pin round connector.

It could have been anyone, not just a CBer or Freebander, trying to use the mike on whatever rig they had. If the person modifying the cable had good technical skills, you would not be able to tell whether it was original or not.

There were a lot of ham rigs, back in the day, that had lots of power and didn't need ANY modification to operate on 11 Meters. Because, 11 Meters use to be a ham band. But no one really wanted it, or used it, until they wanted to take it away. I guess it was the principal of the thing.

For example the E. F. Johnson Ranger. If you look carefully at the dial, you will see the 27 MHz frequency range and 11 Meters on the Band Switch. When I was in high school (graduated 1967) these were the favorite among the CB operators. One of my class mates even used a Ranger to push a linear that used a "4-1000". It was a crazy time.
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Martin - K7MEM
http://www.k7mem.com
KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2016, 06:25:41 PM »

Could have been modified by a CBer or Freebander to fit on another rig.  I believe that the 10 meter Uniden HR-2510 radio had a similar connector, and that rig is one if their favorites.

It looks like the original connector. It's possible that it was an aftermarket mic meant for a freeband rig like the HR-2510. Or Midland could have made a 10/11 meter rig and used that connector on it since the freebanders would be familiar with it. From what I know, the FCC didn't have strict prohibitions against freeband or modifiable 10m rigs 40 years ago-look at the Siltronix Comanche which had 200w input and could be modded to work on 11m. The rules said that CB's were limited to 5w input, but apparently the rule wasn't strictly enforced like it is today. And even today, people buy "10m" rigs from China over the internet, ship them in via the mail, then flip them on Craigslist with instructions on 11m modding included. Just yesterday a freeband rig popped up on SF CL.

No, the HR-2510 didn't have that kind of connector. The HR-2510 had a 5-pin round connector.

It could have been anyone, not just a CBer or Freebander, trying to use the mike on whatever rig they had. If the person modifying the cable had good technical skills, you would not be able to tell whether it was original or not.

There were a lot of ham rigs, back in the day, that had lots of power and didn't need ANY modification to operate on 11 Meters. Because, 11 Meters use to be a ham band. But no one really wanted it, or used it, until they wanted to take it away. I guess it was the principal of the thing.

For example the E. F. Johnson Ranger. If you look carefully at the dial, you will see the 27 MHz frequency range and 11 Meters on the Band Switch. When I was in high school (graduated 1967) these were the favorite among the CB operators. One of my class mates even used a Ranger to push a linear that used a "4-1000". It was a crazy time.


Sometimes I wonder if the channel 6 CB outlaws that I can hear sometimes are running old equipment like the Johnson Ranger and other vintage 11m capable gear. There is plenty of old hollow state gear out there that is still going, it's like the old 1950s cars that are still plying the streets of Havana, or the old Soviet commercial shortwave gear still used by Radio Havana. I've seen pix of Arnie Coro posing with old tube gear in his personal shack. Back in the old days, everything was built to last, because repair was cheaper than replacement. Everything now is cheap and falls apart after 18 months or so, but hey Wally Werld is always fully stocked!  Roll Eyes Roll Eyes The Heathkit VFO-1 had 11m capability. The hi-z mic I ultimately got uses what looks to be a DIN. I intend to use it on a Swan 270B I'm fixing. I will need to rig an adapter to match the DIN to the 1/4" plug, but DIN connectors are plentiful here.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2016, 06:30:20 PM »

Took a closer look at that Midland, sure enough that plug is an end-user modded connection. Probably somebody with an old military rig, as N3QE suggested. I know that in the 60s schematics circulated for adding VOX break-in capability to old tube gear, maybe the original owner was thinking along those lines.
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K5TED
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2016, 10:29:27 PM »

77-838 and 77-849 Midlands both used 12 pin mic connectors. Odd but factory. They were an early stab at Up/Down Channel buttons on the radio and mic instead of a rotary selector.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2016, 10:39:55 PM by K5TED » Logged
KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 820




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« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2016, 08:24:05 AM »

77-838 and 77-849 Midlands both used 12 pin mic connectors. Odd but factory. They were an early stab at Up/Down Channel buttons on the radio and mic instead of a rotary selector.

Like K7MEM said, it can be hard to tell the difference sometimes. Thanks for the clarification, TED. I noticed that similar Midland mics on Ebay used different connectors, the 12 pin jack was probably short lived.
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KD8GEH
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« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2016, 07:45:26 PM »

Its a remote cb mic, the rig is a black box and the mic has the volume, squelch and remaining controls, hence the extra wires. Interesting idea until the cable wore out.  I dont know how I know this, a flashback perhaps  Grin

73, Dave
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