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Author Topic: AIR BAND MONITORING  (Read 13710 times)
N9LCD
Member

Posts: 293




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« on: July 25, 2016, 03:17:36 PM »

One day I was stepping through the VHF air band in 25 KHz steps on the PCR-100.  I paused for a moment on 121.5, VHF Emergency.  As I took care of a pressing matter, I heard about 10 or 12 words in a male voice and, asfter about 10 seconds, a four word reply.

I keyed 243.00 into the IC-R7000 and called up NorComm dispatch on the VX-7R.

I'm sitting there and waiting.  NOTHING!  He must be pretty far out.

Then it dawned on me:  With the prevailing winds that day, aircraft were coming into ORD on a 280 heading on 28/10!

YIKES!    THE PLANE MAY COME IN RIGHT OVER OUR HOUSE  AND WE'RE LESS THAN 1.5 MILES FROM 28/10!

It was nerve-wracking, sitting there and waiting for clarifying information. After about 10 minutes I finally decided it was a "test" transmission and there was no emergency.

Over the years, I've monitored fires, explosions, bomb scare, shootings, 10-1 calls, even a passenger jet retuning to oRD with a full load of passangers and one blown (goosed) engine.

But it's hard to remain calm and detached when an emergency may be heading right at you!

N9LCD 

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KC2QYM
Member

Posts: 860




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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2016, 07:53:40 AM »

I think you need to harden your bunker with thicker walls.  Grin
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WB8VLC
Member

Posts: 426




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« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2016, 09:30:09 PM »

You probably heard a AIR GUARD OR A SAR 243 MHZ call simply because 121.5 and 243 are not monitored anymore for distress purposes, they were phased a couple of years ago for most distress comms in favor of 406MHZ being used for distress.

These days 243MHz  is being used more and more for AIR GUARD and SEARCH and RESCUE purposes.
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KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 3257




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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2016, 09:53:08 AM »

121.5 and 243Mhz are still used for aviation voice purposes for distress.  They are used as backups between controllers and pilots when communications are lost on other frequencies as well.   Emergency Locator Transmitters (beacons) have shifted to 406Mhz for satellite monitoring, however old units may still be heard on these frequencies.

Just because you hear traffic on those frequencies it does not mean that an aircraft is in dire distress and is about to crash.

Please remain calm.  Wink

p.s. Do NOT transmit on these aviation frequencies unless you are directly involved in the emergency. The FAA and FCC take a dim view of non-aviation users transmitting on them.  Keep in mind that your transmissions may interfere with other aircraft or air traffic control stations, up to several hundred miles beyond your radio line of sight.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2016, 10:04:48 AM by KB4QAA » Logged
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