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Author Topic: National Resilience and Morse Code  (Read 1647 times)
VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1044




Ignore
« on: September 08, 2016, 05:07:35 AM »

Far from being "on the way out", for the many reasons stated here CW is here to stay -- forever.

Asia's two most technologically advanced nations -- Korea and Japan -- are still using CW Korean and Japanese CW even for some of their fishing vessels. Not because they don't have data modes, of course they do, but because it is still useful.

Several militaries continue to use CW as well as some navies. They are prepared for what happens if satellites are knocked out either by massive solar storm or in war. Indonesia has a National Resilience Institute, a shame we don't have such...

And the National Resilience Institute in conjunction with the Indonesian navy broadcasts several times daily on 4 frequencies on HF, its messages in CW, in plain text Indonesian, at around 22WPM, in their own broadcast and QTC format -- for example they have a clever way to insert line feeds and thus paragraphs: ")" -- if a closing bracket (parenthesis) is not closing off an previously opened "(" then it is a line feed.

India recently sent some naval vessels to join Malaysia in some naval exercises, and revived their naval CW station to keep open channels of communication if alternative means should fail.

The Russian navy still broadcasts weather reports in CW, as does one or more of China's HF maritime stations, broadcasting navigational warnings in Chinese CW.

Some of the intelligence agencies too continue to use CW, broadcasting encrypted numbers in Morse Code to their spies or out posts on HF -- while many of these have moved to voice and data, there are clearly still some spies receiving their instructions via Morse Code even today.

But these are just a few examples of CW being alive and still well among non-amateur usages, but the above link contains many reasons why CW not only is still being used but will likely forever find its use, not least for some of us who wish to eat, burp and expell gas without being rude and carry on talking with our fingers at the same time, how else can you do that efficiently and effectively with ONLY TWO fingers without being rude? Even a keyboard two fingers on one hand is too QRS.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 05:09:44 AM by VK5EEE » Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
W3TTT
Member

Posts: 264




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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2016, 11:53:36 AM »

 Grin
I can communicate quite nicely using only one finger.   Undecided  Using a straight key  Cheesy
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VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1044




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2016, 07:26:11 PM »

Grin
I can communicate quite nicely using only one finger.   Undecided  Using a straight key  Cheesy
Grin how on earth could I forget that?! Guess I was thinking of QRQ only! Yes, all we need is ONE finger, or even a foot... one day I want to actually try QLF for real. The other day I had old car grease all over my fingers and replied to a call using a clenched fist, then the back of my hand... it wasn't great Morse at all but it worked!
Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
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