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Author Topic: Australia's 44 year old CW Net  (Read 1850 times)
VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1048




Ignore
« on: September 10, 2016, 05:50:09 PM »

I'm sharing this concept, as it may serve to improve levels of CW QSO activitity in other parts of the world if adopted.

As far as I know this is a rather unique net system or procedure, unlike any other nets I encountered before. The fact it has been running every Sunday for so many decades, with the exception of Remembrance Day and Christmas Day, on 7025kHz is clearly a testimony to its successful and popular method.

It provides a chance for old and new friends to have QSO now and then, but also in a sort of random manner, so that you don't necessarily get thrown together with those you choose to, as you will see when I explain it.

First, I will share various other types of nets before explaining this one...

TRAFFIC NETS: A net control runs the net, and calls up stations or allow stations to check in, and assigns them frequencies and stations to exchange messages with, according to need.

ROUND ROBIN: A net control may exist, and each check-in then enters the rotation, and each waits their turn, so it is like a QSO with multiple stations one after the other, all together on the same frequency.

VKCW NET: A net control (whoever shows up first or volunteers) takes checkins, each is acknowledges and asked to standby, then each is called in turn, and may request a QSO with another, if so be assigned another frequency upon net closing, or send any important traffic. A simple net that is short in duration.

VK Sunday Morning CW NET:

Now to the subject of this post. A roster is arranged in advance as to who will conduct net control (QNN), and the net opens with the net number (more than 2,000 sessions as of now!), greeting and all welcome. The net control station (QNN/NCS) then calls CQ CW NET DE CALLSIGN QNI (check-in) PSE K and this goes on for a full TWO HOURS duration on Sunday mornings: this gives plenty of time for people to meander in without pressure. It takes place at 10AM local NSW time lasting until midday. It covers South Eastern Australia, conditions don't allow generally for West and North. This is however where most hams in VK are located.

The first station to check in, is asked to stand by. The NCS may have a short chat with waiting station between CQ CW NET calls, e.g. a mention of the WX. The next station to check in is then asked to standby, and the first is asked if he copies the second. If yes the second is also asked if he copies the first. This is easily and efficiently done in CW e.g.: Ian copy Bob? K ... if both copy each other, NCS will assign a frequency e.g. VK2BJT ES VK2BTJ QSY 7012 BJT K - R - BTJ K - R then NCS continues calling CQ until he can pair up the next two that check in.

At the end of the net the net control gives a list of all the stations that participated (QNS). Here is a record of recent check-ins: http://www.vkcw.net/7025qns and as you can see, given the low CW operators population of VK (my estimate is there are only around 100 CW operators who conduct CW QSO with other VK hams in general each month, and only 200 or so regular CW operators for DX QSO, the remainder are contesters, 5NN TU activities etc.)

Sometimes if stations can't hear each other as they are too far apart they may request a QSP to QSY to 10 or 14MHz.
Some of us are trying to establish a net that in similar fashion but for half to one hour duration, covers the remoter parts of VK and also the region, and are doing so on 20m. Regular participants are 3D, ZL, VK but we have not yet reached enough and regular check-ins to enable QSY for QSO, and this new experimental net usually has 2 NCS so as to try and cover dead zone on 20m, e.g. one in 3D and/or ZL and one in VK where possible. Those within the dead zone could then be paired off to 40m for QSO. This goes to show that the idea of the "Sunday morning VK CW Net" is a good one and could possibly be used in other areas.

More information about this net as well as an old entry in Amateur Radio magazine explaining it, with photos of the founders back in the 1970s, can be found here.

Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3525




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 03:11:44 PM »

I'm sharing this concept, as it may serve to improve levels of CW QSO activitity in other parts of the world if adopted.

As far as I know this is a rather unique net system or procedure, unlike any other nets I encountered before. The fact it has been running every Sunday for so many decades, with the exception of Remembrance Day and Christmas Day, on 7025kHz is clearly a testimony to its successful and popular method.

It provides a chance for old and new friends to have QSO now and then, but also in a sort of random manner, so that you don't necessarily get thrown together with those you choose to, as you will see when I explain it.

First, I will share various other types of nets before explaining this one...

TRAFFIC NETS: A net control runs the net, and calls up stations or allow stations to check in, and assigns them frequencies and stations to exchange messages with, according to need.

ROUND ROBIN: A net control may exist, and each check-in then enters the rotation, and each waits their turn, so it is like a QSO with multiple stations one after the other, all together on the same frequency.

VKCW NET: A net control (whoever shows up first or volunteers) takes checkins, each is acknowledges and asked to standby, then each is called in turn, and may request a QSO with another, if so be assigned another frequency upon net closing, or send any important traffic. A simple net that is short in duration.

VK Sunday Morning CW NET:

Now to the subject of this post. A roster is arranged in advance as to who will conduct net control (QNN), and the net opens with the net number (more than 2,000 sessions as of now!), greeting and all welcome. The net control station (QNN/NCS) then calls CQ CW NET DE CALLSIGN QNI (check-in) PSE K and this goes on for a full TWO HOURS duration on Sunday mornings: this gives plenty of time for people to meander in without pressure. It takes place at 10AM local NSW time lasting until midday. It covers South Eastern Australia, conditions don't allow generally for West and North. This is however where most hams in VK are located.

The first station to check in, is asked to stand by. The NCS may have a short chat with waiting station between CQ CW NET calls, e.g. a mention of the WX. The next station to check in is then asked to standby, and the first is asked if he copies the second. If yes the second is also asked if he copies the first. This is easily and efficiently done in CW e.g.: Ian copy Bob? K ... if both copy each other, NCS will assign a frequency e.g. VK2BJT ES VK2BTJ QSY 7012 BJT K - R - BTJ K - R then NCS continues calling CQ until he can pair up the next two that check in.

At the end of the net the net control gives a list of all the stations that participated (QNS). Here is a record of recent check-ins: http://www.vkcw.net/7025qns and as you can see, given the low CW operators population of VK (my estimate is there are only around 100 CW operators who conduct CW QSO with other VK hams in general each month, and only 200 or so regular CW operators for DX QSO, the remainder are contesters, 5NN TU activities etc.)

Sometimes if stations can't hear each other as they are too far apart they may request a QSP to QSY to 10 or 14MHz.
Some of us are trying to establish a net that in similar fashion but for half to one hour duration, covers the remoter parts of VK and also the region, and are doing so on 20m. Regular participants are 3D, ZL, VK but we have not yet reached enough and regular check-ins to enable QSY for QSO, and this new experimental net usually has 2 NCS so as to try and cover dead zone on 20m, e.g. one in 3D and/or ZL and one in VK where possible. Those within the dead zone could then be paired off to 40m for QSO. This goes to show that the idea of the "Sunday morning VK CW Net" is a good one and could possibly be used in other areas.

More information about this net as well as an old entry in Amateur Radio magazine explaining it, with photos of the founders back in the 1970s, can be found here.


    That's what you call dedication!  Thanks for the post!  Smiley
Logged
VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1048




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2016, 05:54:53 AM »

Thanks ONAIR :-) I wish I knew what your callsign is, but, I also wish I'd started posting on this sometimes hostile forum WITHOUT my call sign!  Smiley 73
Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
VK5EEE
Member

Posts: 1048




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2016, 05:59:24 AM »

The basic idea of course is to encourage more "non-5NN" type CW activities, and that hopefully this or other types of formats could serve to encourage others in other parts of the world to make an attempt... I'm enjoying reading about the SSN Side Swiper Nets thanks to a post in this forum!
Logged

Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
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