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Author Topic: Battery capacity lost after 1 year. Why?  (Read 20925 times)
KC2MMI
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Posts: 828




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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2018, 08:30:57 PM »

Rob-
 Lithium cell batteries are great, and may in fact be the cheapest batteries in the long run despite having the highest up-front costs. But they're not quite perfect. If they are overcharged, or undercharged, they can be killed surprisingly easily. And that means a good battery management system, and if that fails, the batteries are toast again anyway.
 But if the user is very much aware of their limits, and keeps them within those limits, they're great. Especially the LiFePO4 chemistry, which is the least powerful type, but the only type that doesn't use a flammable electrolyte.
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AC7CW
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Posts: 1162




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« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2018, 04:19:27 PM »

I'm playing with LiFePO4 cells and a solar panel currently. Once I get past the cell balancing stuff I think I'll be a happy camper with a battery that weighs about a third of the lead acids...
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
KD8SKM
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2018, 10:40:14 AM »

UPDATE:

I only have a simple 1 amp passive balancer that kicks in at 3.65 volts on each cell group...  And the inverters cut off at 10.7 volts as not not over discharge the cells.

Initially I balanced the cells by connecting in parallel and let sit for 24 hours.

It will be 6 years in April and I am not seeing any significant voltage imbalance even at the top of charge or bottom where the tails are - maybe 50 mV at most.

So yes even a simple balancing scheme like this is adequate for LiFePO4 batteries.

If I had used any variant of Lead Acid I would be on my 3rd or 4th set of batteries this spring....

Just measured 608 Amp hours on a "600 amp hour" pack that is 6 years old and cycled every day.  I have lost 7 amp hours in 6 years... not complaining.

Cheers,

Rob
KD8SKM
DIY Solar for U
www.diysolarforu.com
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KD8IIC
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Posts: 764




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« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2018, 04:20:02 AM »

  OK Rob, Who is the suplier for these batteries? Can you supply us with brand, model or item numbers?
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N9AOP
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Posts: 802




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« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2018, 10:51:42 AM »

I use 2 golf cart batteries.  These things are cheap, will take abuse and are heavier than sin.  Don't forget to do something with the hydrogen that they outgass.
Art
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KD8SKM
Member

Posts: 12




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« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2018, 12:19:17 PM »

Orginially I got my 100 amp hour cells from Tenergy -
http://www.all-battery.com

They are the ones in service at the cabin (24 of them) and are 6 years old with no significant drop in performance... measuring 608 amp hours on a "600" pack.

I have also used batteries from www.bateryspace.com
The have a good price on a 20 amp hour 12.8 volt pack for $133 plus shipping

I use these at trade shows and Hamvention in Dayton (Xenia) as 2 of them power a color laser printer in parallel so a 40 amp hour pack.  With 82 amp draw batteries are at 12.5 volts!  This printer takes 1100 watts out of the AC inverter which is a Xantrex SW2000.

Cheers

Rob
KD8SKM
DIY Solar for U
www.diysolarforu.com
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