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Author Topic: What were the Morse code speed requirements in Your Country to Get a Ham License  (Read 9846 times)
VK4FFAB
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Posts: 428




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« Reply #30 on: November 13, 2016, 11:46:55 PM »

0 WPM send and receive. I passed with 100% correct.
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W4KYR
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Posts: 1613




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« Reply #31 on: November 15, 2016, 02:15:10 PM »

UK (Great Britain) 1966

Class A Full License 12 words per minute
Class B No Morse but restricted to above 420 mhz

Source : "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966
 
Three hour written test, a single paper divided into two parts. Applications to take the test have to be made in advance at least three months. The fee for the written exam is 30/- and a small fee 5/- is for the local examination 'centre'.

Applicants must be over 14 years of age. "Applicants must have passed the Post Office Morse Test not more than twelve months before applying for a licence."

Looks like the Morse Code was done at the Post Office and the written part was done somewhere else.

Morse Code requirements for 1966

"This test involves the receiving and sending of plain language text at an average speed of 12 words per minute"

"This does not apply to the Amateur (Sound) Licence B (telephony only above 420 Mc/s) or the Amateur (Television) Licence.


Above from : "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966 Page 71

"In the test, 36 words (average length five letters per word) must be sent and 36 words received in two periods of three minutes each. Up to four errors are permitted in the copy received and up to four corrections may be made while sending; there must be no corrected errors in sending.

Ten groups of five figures must be sent, and ten groups copied, in two periods of 1 1/2 minutes each; a maximum of two receiving errors are permitted in this section, and up to two corrections made while sending.

The fee for the Post office Morse test is 10/- . "


Source: "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966 Page 78

http://www.g4dmp.co.uk/agtar.pdf



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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #32 on: November 15, 2016, 08:29:20 PM »

UK (Great Britain) 1966

Class A Full License 12 words per minute
Class B No Morse but restricted to above 420 mhz

Source : "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966
 
Three hour written test, a single paper divided into two parts. Applications to take the test have to be made in advance at least three months. The fee for the written exam is 30/- and a small fee 5/- is for the local examination 'centre'.

Applicants must be over 14 years of age. "Applicants must have passed the Post Office Morse Test not more than twelve months before applying for a licence."

Looks like the Morse Code was done at the Post Office and the written part was done somewhere else.

Morse Code requirements for 1966

"This test involves the receiving and sending of plain language text at an average speed of 12 words per minute"

"This does not apply to the Amateur (Sound) Licence B (telephony only above 420 Mc/s) or the Amateur (Television) Licence.


Above from : "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966 Page 71

"In the test, 36 words (average length five letters per word) must be sent and 36 words received in two periods of three minutes each. Up to four errors are permitted in the copy received and up to four corrections may be made while sending; there must be no corrected errors in sending.

Ten groups of five figures must be sent, and ten groups copied, in two periods of 1 1/2 minutes each; a maximum of two receiving errors are permitted in this section, and up to two corrections made while sending.

The fee for the Post office Morse test is 10/- . "


Source: "A guide to Amateur Radio" by J. Pat Hawker G3VA published by the RSGB 1966 Page 78

http://www.g4dmp.co.uk/agtar.pdf




The Morse test was done either at GPO HQ in London, or at the various Coast Radio stations around the UK.  I did mine in London a very formal and no frivolity affair.

The 3 hour test was a formal 3 hour exam by The City & Guilds of London institute, it was quite a strict exam.

Fortunately for me, Radio College accepted the Radio Amateurs exam pass as the equivalent of UE in English,Maths and a Science.

When I see some of the questions about fairly basic things, i do wonder at the level of technical examination now.

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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
VK4FFAB
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Posts: 428




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« Reply #33 on: November 16, 2016, 12:50:01 AM »


When I see some of the questions about fairly basic things, i do wonder at the level of technical examination now.


It is kind to be expected, ham radio has evolved from a fairly technically oriented hobby that appealed to and was practiced by people with a deep interest in radio communications technology to a social hobby where the radio is incidental to activities like 'activating' hilltops, lighthouses, parks, trams etc or simply collecting DX awards. And with that come questions that some of the technically minded think are beneath them or the hobby.

Times have changed, radio operator is no longer a job, service technician if they exist is trouble shoot to a board level, rip and replace. And the list goes on, and so the hobby has evolved. For Most people entering the hobby, teaching them Ebay would be more beneficial than how to bias a BJT device or valve theory for that matter. People will do the bits of the hobby they find most appealing, morse, rag chewing, dx, awards, for me it is construction, knowledge and my soldering iron. And even for that, radio is incidental to what i do.

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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #34 on: November 16, 2016, 11:01:46 AM »


When I see some of the questions about fairly basic things, i do wonder at the level of technical examination now.


It is kind to be expected, ham radio has evolved from a fairly technically oriented hobby that appealed to and was practiced by people with a deep interest in radio communications technology to a social hobby where the radio is incidental to activities like 'activating' hilltops, lighthouses, parks, trams etc or simply collecting DX awards. And with that come questions that some of the technically minded think are beneath them or the hobby.

Times have changed, radio operator is no longer a job, service technician if they exist is trouble shoot to a board level, rip and replace. And the list goes on, and so the hobby has evolved. For Most people entering the hobby, teaching them Ebay would be more beneficial than how to bias a BJT device or valve theory for that matter. People will do the bits of the hobby they find most appealing, morse, rag chewing, dx, awards, for me it is construction, knowledge and my soldering iron. And even for that, radio is incidental to what i do.



But I see some people asking why does a dipole have two legs, that is beyond a joke.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
G4LNA
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Posts: 148




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« Reply #35 on: November 16, 2016, 11:32:41 AM »

I took my Morse test in the Marine Services Division just off Fleet Street in London, it was just down the road from where I used to work, that was in early 1981.
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #36 on: November 16, 2016, 12:29:24 PM »

I took my Morse test in the Marine Services Division just off Fleet Street in London, it was just down the road from where I used to work, that was in early 1981.

From memory I did mine at St Martins le Grand building, little did they know what they were letting loose.  Grin Grin Grin

Any idea who took you for your test?
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
G4LNA
Member

Posts: 148




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« Reply #37 on: November 16, 2016, 01:43:55 PM »


Any idea who took you for your test?

I've no idea.

It was interesting because there was a couple of other guys doing their 20WPM marine test at the same time, the examiner asked if I wanted to wait outside or stay, it was up to me, I stayed and copied their test at 20WPM, he looked at the paper and said he wouldn't bother with the 12WPM in that case as I had copied sufficient at that speed.

I said don't expect me to send at 20WPM because I can't, so he got a shaky 15WPM from me  Smiley  I've always been able to copy far faster than I can send for some reason, even now I can easily copy the HSC guys, but I can't send at their speeds  Angry how the hell they send at those speeds I've no idea, 30WPM after that my fingers sort of peter out and I get my twiters in a nisck.

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VK4FFAB
Member

Posts: 428




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« Reply #38 on: November 16, 2016, 02:18:20 PM »


When I see some of the questions about fairly basic things, i do wonder at the level of technical examination now.


It is kind to be expected, ham radio has evolved from a fairly technically oriented hobby that appealed to and was practiced by people with a deep interest in radio communications technology to a social hobby where the radio is incidental to activities like 'activating' hilltops, lighthouses, parks, trams etc or simply collecting DX awards. And with that come questions that some of the technically minded think are beneath them or the hobby.

Times have changed, radio operator is no longer a job, service technician if they exist is trouble shoot to a board level, rip and replace. And the list goes on, and so the hobby has evolved. For Most people entering the hobby, teaching them Ebay would be more beneficial than how to bias a BJT device or valve theory for that matter. People will do the bits of the hobby they find most appealing, morse, rag chewing, dx, awards, for me it is construction, knowledge and my soldering iron. And even for that, radio is incidental to what i do.



But I see some people asking why does a dipole have two legs, that is beyond a joke.

Perhaps it is, perhaps it isnt. We all learn things to pass exams, but often times we have little fundamental understanding of the subject matter and as less technical minded people come into the hobby this disparity between understanding and learning will become more and more apparent. None of which I think is really a big deal if we accept that people will learn at their own pace over time and that amateur radio is a hobby of life long learning.

There are a lot of really talented CW operators in this forum, but, other than a small handful, how many know their cathode from their anode? Understand the difference between P and N channel devices, Could bias a BJT in class a, ab or c? Or could do the math to determine the current flow through the emitter? I doubt very few in this very group could do many of these things at all. Yet, they all learned these things or similar at some point to get their advanced tickets.

Something i read from someone much smarter than I, is that we are all Black Box operators, for some the black box is the entire station, for others it is an individual device or circuit block, and when i truly groked the point being made in that statement, I became less judgemental of the deficiencies I perceived in others who do not home brew and experiment like i do or wish to learn and experiment with CW or had my understanding on a topic. We are all on our own journey in amateur radio, some start from a very low point indeed and others, like yourself have 30+ years of industry experience under their belts. About the only important thing, is that we do radio our own ways and enjoy ourselves, and where possible, pass on our experience and understanding to others who desire the knowledge.

Oh and while I understand superficially why a dipole has 2 legs and kind of get how voltage and current move through it, my understanding of antenna theory is basic at best, because I find antenna theory boring. But I am starting to understand how and why a dual gate mosfet operates as a mixer. Different strokes, different folks.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2016, 02:31:40 PM by VK4FFAB » Logged
VK5EEE
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Posts: 1196




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« Reply #39 on: November 16, 2016, 05:44:03 PM »

I took my Morse test in the Marine Services Division just off Fleet Street in London, it was just down the road from where I used to work, that was in early 1981.
We might have taken it in the same room at the same time Paul! I wish I knew the exact date and even place where I took it or the examiner. All I remember is him being suprised at a youngster with good CW and complementing me on it. I know I went up on a train to take the exam in Derby, and when coming back into London it was snowing, some kind of unusual event, everything covered in snow, and me thinking damn, I have gone to Scotland by mistake, wrong direction! I think that was in 1981.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever

Support CW and join CW clubs. QTT: FIST#1124, HSC#1437, UFT#728, RCWC#982, SKCC#15007, CWOPS#1714, 30CW#1,
ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1225




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« Reply #40 on: November 16, 2016, 08:56:53 PM »

VK4FFAB. You make a lot of really good points, and yes we have all become black box operators.

Really it is a shame, because those halcyon days of a G2DAF design and seeing it come together, or even a Heathkit have passed for many.

The construction work that you do and the QRP is really more what it used to be.

10 watts was the limit on 160 and a lot of us had tremendous fun on CW with just that power, (More or less).

I think that the skill now is more and more in getting the black boxes to talk to each other, so the hobby has certainly moved along.

GL Cheers  gavin
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
SM0AOM
Member

Posts: 189




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« Reply #41 on: November 19, 2016, 09:03:21 AM »

Huh
The interesting question is this: Was there ANY COUNTRY that has or had a requirement for CW at 13 WPM or faster? So far, the answer is NO.  It seems that the only country that required 20 WPM was the US.
 Undecided

Sweden had 16 WPM for the Class A licence 1947-1989
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K9RJ
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #42 on: November 29, 2016, 08:04:19 PM »

When I tested in Canada in 1967 it was 10 wpm for the Amateur Certificate of Proficiency in Radio. I passed and became VE2DGL. Later I passed the Advanced Amateur licence which required 15 wpm. Those were the days. I did the test in front of a RI (Radio Inspector). Still have the Certificates hanging on the shack wall. --... ...--
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