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Author Topic: Comparing New SDRPlay RSP2 With RSP1  (Read 2264 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2880




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« on: December 07, 2016, 10:09:44 AM »

I know lots of SDRPlay RSP owners have bought the brand new model too as I have.

Looking for comparisons from owners. I understand that It's very early in the game for model 2.

I've only played with mine a few hours. The incredibly crowded 160 meter band sounded like it should during the weekend's big CW contest. The VHF spectrum produces tons of aircraft on AM in the Aero Band. I'm still unclear about how best to listen to longwave with the new antenna connections, but I did pickup a North Carolina NDB last night using a jerry-rigged pigtail. My RSP1 always worked great on FM broadcast so I've largely ignored that range.  

I did spend a fair amount of time checking out the calibration. RSP1, which tunes up to 2GHz, was criticized for its 10 PPM crystal accuracy. The new model has a more standard and costly 0.5 PPM oscillator.  Both are trimable manually or via an automatic routine. I really don't see much difference between the two radios once they're calibrated against WWV. As expected, RSP1 required more movement, about 2.20 PPM. RSP2 needed about a tenth that. But neither shows significant drift at WWV frequencies after warmup. RSP1 calibration/stability seems plenty adequate for common purposes.  

On the important question of whether the RSP2 reduces AM/FM broadcast breakthrough, I haven't compared that yet.    

« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 10:14:46 AM by K0OD » Logged
N2DTS
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Posts: 465




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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2016, 11:00:37 AM »

All I know is my rsp2 works very well for the money from the AM broadcast band on up.
Below the AM broadcast band seems a mess with blow through from something, but its not the AM broadcast band because the filters for that work VERY well.
If you turn the filter on while tuned to a very strong AM station it almost is totally gone.

It likely works very well down there (VLF) with some sort of preselector/antenna tuner.

You DO have to control the gain some, on lower frequencies (160, 80 and 40 meters) with a good antenna, the gain needs to be way down, and higher or all the way up on the higher bands.

The adjustable preamp and filters seem well worth the extra cost.
Adjusting the gain makes a big difference between bands on my setup.

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K0OD
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Posts: 2880




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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2016, 01:16:22 PM »

Surprising side by side photo shows there's vastly more to the RSP2 compared with the skimpy RSP1.
I'm thinking that future SDRUno software releases will reveal new features and performance
improvements. This photo is one reason I decided to buy the new model. 

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N0YXB
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2016, 01:37:29 PM »

Very interesting, I've definitely got to get an RSP2.
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N2DTS
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Posts: 465




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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2016, 04:57:26 PM »

And be sure to try it on a real computer, not a laptop.
All the laptops I have had generate a lot of noise, mostly from the power supply, but from the laptop itself also, no shielding at all on most of them.
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G1HBE
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« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2016, 03:20:38 AM »

The VLF performance is really good on the Hi-z input. Signals from NDB's and time & frequency standards come in solid against a low background noise.  There are a few images from the MW band, but you can move these out of the way by re-tuning. The AM(MW) rejector does not work on this input, but you can easily construct a simple LPF that rejects everything above 400 KHz.
The performance of the two SMA inputs drops slowly away below the MW band (this is documented) and by the time you get down to 100KHz there is lots of 'grub' beginning to turn up and signals are poor. I use these two inputs (A and B) purely for VHF/UHF.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2016, 03:27:15 AM by G1HBE » Logged
K0OD
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« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2016, 04:03:44 AM »

Quote
"The VLF performance is really good on the Hi-z input. Signals from NDB's and time & frequency standards come in solid against a low background noise"

Spent time on VLF last night and wasn't impressed with the signals I heard. Only a few local NDBs and no Euro broadcasters. But propagation in general has been dreadful. About the only WWV frequency I've been hearing well is 5 MHz. So my difficulties below the BCB may have been propagation related. I connected to the Hi-Z port but not sure I used it optimally. 

On the plus side, VLF was pretty clean of broadcast crud once I adjusted the gain slider on my RSP2. Maybe cleaner than on my  RSP1.  More comparisons to come...
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N2DTS
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« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2016, 07:50:50 AM »

The high z input seems to work much better at work on the off center fed dipole on the lower bands.
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K0OD
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Posts: 2880




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« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2016, 03:03:44 AM »

"This issue with the gain being incorrectly set after changing the 1st LO and some other parameters such as the sampling rate is a bug. It should be fixed in the next release of SDRuno. Many thanks for flagging this.

Sincerely

SDRplay Tech_Support"

http://www.sdrplay.com/community/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1509
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