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Author Topic: Long Distance AM station listening a new craze.  (Read 26312 times)
N8YX
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Posts: 989




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« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2017, 04:35:33 PM »

For an antenna, what I'd do is the following:

1) K9AY or similar loop. Maybe 6ft in diameter, electrically (varactor) tuned from the listening position and steerable by means of a TV antenna rotator.
2) The aforementioned End-Fedz or - if you have a high enough central support point - an array of Alpha Delta DX-SWL slopers steered with a remote coax switch. 5 in a NE/SE/S/SW/NW orientation ought to cover it nicely.
3) An active noise canceller (MFJ-1026 or equivalent) with an amplified vertical sense antenna of between 3 and 6ft. tall. Use this in conjunction with 1 or 2 if an offending noise source (like a noisy power line) can't be nulled out.
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KC8KTN
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Posts: 1400


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« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2017, 06:02:15 PM »

 AGAIN: THANKS TO ALL WHOM HAVE GIVEN ADVICE......

Would you guys recommend ccrane for am receivers or would you recommend another.....


http://www.ccrane.com/CCRadio-2E-Enhanced-AMFMWX2-Meter-Ham-Band-Radio-Black-Mica?gclid=CjwKEAiArIDFBRCe_9DJi6Or0UcSJAAK1nFvwnF43-N9HH137tUwEzplFFRzZCRcFfNgq4ef4N-smRoCdn_w_wcB
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WB8VLC
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Posts: 427




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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2017, 08:19:20 PM »

The Ccrane is fine for strong  SWL stations but for weak AM MEDIUM WAVE dx you really want a receiver with a narrow bandwidth cability, good noise reduction and especially a separate antenna connector for items that others mention in this thread to enhance medium wave reception.

Also as mentioned the mfj1026 noise canceling unit is good and although it requires some mods, that are well worthwhile to do, for aiding the Medium Wave performance, it is reasonably priced and once modified for medium wave use it is a capable noise reducer.

Also as mentioned my n8yx, a k9ay loop or shared Apex loop is more doable from a size/performance ratio standpoint as compared to a beverage antenna.
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WA8ZTZ
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Posts: 248




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« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2017, 01:52:27 AM »

The CCrane portables have a good reputation.  Have the CCrane Radio-EP here and it performs better than my GE Superadio III. It also has provision for external antenna connection.  Portables are what they are...  they will not replace a communications receiver.  The antenna is really the thing.  Look into the CCrane Twin Coil Ferrite antenna mentioned in my earlier post.  This is a simple way to get started in AM DX and it works amazingly well.  If you really get into this AM stuff, then the MFJ 1026 is another useful accessory.  It can be modified to cover AM BCB...  works great for reducing interference.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 188




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« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2017, 04:06:30 AM »

As a long time MW DX aficionado, in my experience almost ANY AM radio can DX, if you use an outboard inductively coupled loop (the ETON and Terk loop antenna models work well, as does the Select-A-Tenna). I've DXed with clock radios, Walkmen and boomboxes before, using external loops with them.

Most modern AM radios have a ceramic filter, which makes for adequate selectivity for most MW DXing. For heavy duty MW DXing, higher selectivity radios and comm rigs are probably better.

The CCrane EP has a good rep in the MW DX world, as I believe it has a 200mm internal loop antenna (the ad says the antenna is a Twin Coil Ferrite antenna -- such antennas work very well for DX), and I believe the CCraneEP has a tuned RF stage. A lot of guys DX with them.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2017, 04:09:04 AM by RENTON481 » Logged
W4KYR
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Posts: 1612




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« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2017, 05:29:04 AM »

Check YouTube for videos of Transatlantic AM DX. Some of it is quite interesting. A lot of Coastal AM (and even inland) stations have antenna patterns that spray most of their 50,000 watt signals into the Atlantic in order to serve a large metropolitan area and not have to worry about reducing power at AM at night.

Several relatively close by AM stations that spray their signal due east are never heard here in the Midwest at night (or in most cases not even heard during the day). Like CKLW 800 Windsor Ontario, WWKB 1520 Buffalo NY, WWVA 1170 West Virginia, WBAL 1090 Baltimore, WBT 1110 Charlotte NC and WFED 1500 Washington DC and many are non existent at night here but have huge signals into the NYC area.

I remember during the winter, WWKB (ex-WKBW) 1520 could be heard during the day into the NYC Metropolitan area. At night they were a powerhouse!
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N8YX
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Posts: 989




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« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2017, 07:22:45 AM »

If you can find a decent example, the Heathkit MR-1010 is also worth a look as an LF/MF DX rig.
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N0YXB
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Posts: 1142




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« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2017, 08:26:07 AM »

I forgot all about the MR-1010. What a cool receiver.
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W4KYR
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Posts: 1612




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« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2017, 08:49:03 AM »

Here is an example of  50,000 watt WBBR 1130 New York City being heard clearly in Ireland.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rgRz0MG0CU

But it cannot be received just a few states away because of their night pattern which is mainly beamed into the Atlantic Ocean.

http://radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/patg?id=WBBR-AM&h=N



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K9MHZ
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Posts: 1452




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« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2017, 09:19:42 AM »

OK Chuck, you're doing good on this one.....don't blow it.  Actually a pretty interesting topic.

 
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KF7CG
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Posts: 1192




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« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2017, 09:46:17 AM »

BCB DXing was one of the things that helped push me into Amateur Radio over 40 years ago. My radios then were the All American 5 tubers with an antenna coupled to them with a small coil of wire taped to the back.

Modern radio for that I find good for AM work is the Sangean AT909 if it is still available, it wasn't inexpensive but did give good coverage, have reasonable selectivity, have a BFO for sideband and also an external antenna jack. Digital tuning too.

OF course my FTdx3000 works pretty well also.

KF7CG
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KC8KTN
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« Reply #26 on: February 13, 2017, 09:52:49 AM »

Again thanks to all the great advice and your time. When i get off work tonight @11:00 pmest I will check out all the information. Again thanks this is the #1 site for Ham/cb/dx information. Take Care all.Trying to make Ham Radio a great listening hobby less talking. 73s
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AA4HA
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Posts: 2384




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« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2017, 10:00:22 AM »

If you like general coverage receivers of a more boat-anchory vintage look at the Hammarlund SP-600 or the Collins (designed) R-390A. The SP-600 is more pleasing sounding and is a late 1940's design but the R-390A was one of the premier designs from the mid 1950's until about 1975.

These are beasts and weigh in at the 40-60 pound range but if they still are highly regarded by the serious BCB DX crowd.

I own both radios and can even hear the little CW transmitters on fishing buoys in the north Atlantic from where I live. Unless there is some sort of crazy storm generated QRN almost every 50K powerhouse east of the rocky mountains can be heard every night (and many during the daytime too).

Listening in on the TIS stations (travelers information) it is just a mass of overlapping audio so nothing makes any sense.

But I also agree, good thread Chuck.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
Free space loss (dB) = 32.4 + 20 × log10d + 20 × log10 f
KB8GAE
Member

Posts: 227




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« Reply #28 on: February 13, 2017, 10:06:56 AM »

You may want to consider joining the Yahoo Ultralight Dx group.

They have tons of fun dxing the am band.  Lots of good info.

They have specific criteria on what receivers qualify as ultralight.

GL & 73's   Rich KB8GAE
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WZ7U
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Posts: 601




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« Reply #29 on: February 13, 2017, 12:25:13 PM »

Again thanks to all the great advice and your time. When i get off work tonight @11:00 pmest I will check out all the information. Again thanks this is the #1 site for Ham/cb/dx information. Take Care all.Trying to make Ham Radio a great listening hobby less talking. 73s


Fixed that for ya. EHam is not a CB site; never was, never will be. This is one issue Chuck I will NOT relent on with you.

Glad you are enjoying the AM BCB. It is still a most fascinating band for me. Makes me wish I could get on 160, maybe......

Having said that, SWL with my Dad as a child helped launch my ham interest. But, there was that sidetrack into CB......(covers face in shame)

Do let us know how it progresses for you.
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================================================
WZ7U ~ originating from CN86jc +/-

Yet another imperfect being created by THE perfect God. Thank you Jesus!
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