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Author Topic: Expert Electronics SunSDR2 QRP new radio announcement 16-bit RF ADC Pre-order  (Read 3311 times)
N3QQ
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« on: March 27, 2017, 03:57:01 PM »

New SunSDR2 QRP SDR Transceiver 5W with a 16-bit RF ADC 160-6m

Kirkland, WA, USA —March 27th, 2017 –

Vasily Vasiliev (RN6LHF), Chief Hardware Engineer of Expert Electronics is pleased to announce availability of new SunSDR2 QRP transceiver 5W and 160-6m coverage in late May, 2017.

Notable features include the blocking dynamic range (BDR) ~115dB, 01-55MHz RX coverage , sample rates of 48-384KHz, 60MHz bandscope and full compatibility with ExpertSDR2 software.

Supported platforms are Windows® XP-10 or Linux Ubuntu x64.

No existing QRP transceivers come close with high sensitivity and broad dynamic range.  Remote operation (TCP/IP) interface is built-in and offers plug-and-play solutions for Amateur, Commercial and Government applications.

For further information please call (800)977-0448
https://nsiradio.com/#!/SunSDR2-QRP-HF-and-6m-SDR-transceiver-5W/p/81566558/category=14078087

73,
Yuri N3QQ


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W7ASA
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2017, 12:08:10 PM »

Wow!  What a great time to be a ham. 

Thanks for posting,

>Ray  ..._  ._
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AK4YH
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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2017, 07:55:41 AM »

Weird that the power supply connector is on the front and the key jack in the back... Otherwise, it looks very interesting, and small, except the price...

Gil.
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W9ZIM
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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2017, 11:29:11 AM »

I like the fact that they support Linux, but you'd think the lack of front-panel hardware and the fact that your PC is the control interface would make it cheaper than the self-contained competition.
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KB1GMX
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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 11:36:40 AM »

From where I sit....

A 900$ radio front end and a cheap PC for maybe 600$ I can easily buy a 7300 with change.
Portable, no to much.

The whole problem with SDR is the need for a decent PC and getting the software
to behave on that.  So the package is not cheap even if it has stellar specs.

For once I'd like to see a SDR with the required "PC" inside and all it needs is
Display, keyboard and mouse to use it as a radio...


Allison
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PJ2BVU
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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2017, 12:10:32 PM »

.....

For once I'd like to see a SDR with the required "PC" inside and all it needs is
Display, keyboard and mouse to use it as a radio...

...

Elad FDM-Duo. But same price as the ICOM-7300.

Jean-Claude PJ2BVU
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W3TTT
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2017, 01:27:17 PM »

From where I sit....
... and a cheap PC for maybe 600$ ...
...The whole problem with SDR is the need for a decent PC and getting the software
to behave on that....
Allison

My laptop cost $230 new.  Toshiba.  Not the top of the line, but absolutely no problems yet...
As for your other comments, yes, I agree.  What about those SDR thumb drives that cost $20?  I think I remember an article in QST for a complete rig in a box using one of these, and a few other parts.
73 de W3TTT
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ZENKI
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« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2017, 03:56:08 PM »

Its a stupid  design in this day and age.

It would not have taken much more effort to  give the radio a front panel and a TFT screen. Have Expert Electronics been looking at what hams have been doing on the STM32 Touch screen board platform? Obviously not. Theres many hams from the same country who have better homebrew  TFT SDR radios.

Likewise they could have used  the many linux  SBC's around . Something like the “NanoPi Neo”  would have made an ideal front panel for this box.

Even more disappointingly is the tendency to design radios like battery technology cant deliver power and  its the laws of physics and contesting that demands a 5 watt only radio. This is really backwards thinking with this  stupid 5 watt output mentality.

It would have been  just as easy to make the radio a 20 or 30 watt radio  that could  run on 18650 or other Lipo hobby car batteries. Ham designs  seem intent on designing Dick Tracey like wrist watch radios that are useless in the real world and  are designed as if they are using valves and need to preserve power like the WW2 spy radios. Its 2017 guys!  Maybe they should visit a part of the planet away from Europe or the USA  and try operating with a radio from a place where the HF bands  are so silent it sounds like 2 meters SSB and there is no country within short skip range. Then you need a 25 watt radio not a 5 watt radio.

Whats the point of making a radio so small  when you consider that the Laptop or computer that you will carry for operation will be 2 or 3 times the size. Its stupid thinking at its best. Even a miserable CB radio from 40 years ago can deliver  20 Watts of SSB output. Then lets talk about the many new Chinese radios that are all 10 to 20 watts of output. These QRP radio designers dont operate with the equipment that they design. They just seem to imitate the last 5 watt radio designer and  think " me too"

QRP radios are best made as stand alone designs with everything that you need in 1 convenient box. Military radio designers of been doing it for 50 years its called a manpack radio. While hams dont always need military ruggedness they do need  the packaging and the 1 box solution.

  I need to buy a radio then I need to trail a  mule to carry all the bits to operate the radio. Why cant designers get this simple fact of life, backpackers and trail hikers have got this concept for decades. Everything goes in 1 pack that enables you to survive. A radio  needs everything in 1 box so that you can operate in  a convenient  manner its simple really. You dont need a bag and a trunk full of junk just to make a few QSO's

I can only imagine what a laughing stock a cell manufacturer would be  if they brought out a SDR cell phone. Now here is your  "cell phone black box", there  is your "screen and interface box" and there is " your battery and interface box" You put one in each pocket and you can walk around  carrying your convenient 3 box cell phone.  A computer driven  SDR radio with external computer as a QRP radio is just such a joke! Hell even a plug in  Smart Phone interface with batteries would have made more sense.

Me carry this radio, a laptop and other junk when I can grab a HF Manpack or a radio like SGC2020 with a mic and battery with 20 watts of output its never going to happen!  Ham designers in the QRP market dont get it yet! Another blackbox that is a useless box in the real world.


I like the fact that they support Linux, but you'd think the lack of front-panel hardware and the fact that your PC is the control interface would make it cheaper than the self-contained competition.
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N3QQ
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« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2017, 12:05:48 PM »

Thank you Ray!

Device is designed for a forward thinking Hams. It is not about how heavy is total package.

Last poster is stuck in wrong reality (great suggestions, but no skin in the game) and since "it" has no balls to attach a real name/callsign, someone may help to take burka off that face:

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-04-01/press-2-use-services-russian-hackers-press-3-request-election-interference

Just kidding. April 1st. No worries.

If "it" wants to check Expert Electronics MB1 TX IMD's, PM me and towards end of this week we can talk on 80m.

73,
Yuri N3QQ


Wow!  What a great time to be a ham. 

Thanks for posting,

>Ray  ..._  ._
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AK4YH
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2017, 12:35:12 AM »

Quote
Immense functionality for a reasonable price

Uh, no! Not even close.

Yuri, it looks like a great little radio, but I can buy a KX3 for that price! It's also an SDR and it has buttons and a screen. I could see your radio on my desk next to my Mac Mini, even taking it camping with my small laptop, but at $400, not $900! If you want to charge that much you need to explain why... The case is very generic, and you need to move the power connector to the back and the key connector to the front. Is it gold plated on the inside? I am sure some people will buy one, but don't say the price is reasonable.

ZENKI has some very good points, though I think 5W is just fine.

Quote
Device is designed for a forward thinking Hams.

What does that even mean?

Not trying to rain on your parade, the radio looks interesting and you probably have to pay lots of taxes on your profits, but from a potential customer's side, not even an option, because of price.

Gil, AK4YH and now F4WBY, where we don't have $900 to buy a radio...

And please ask your buddies to mess with French elections so we don't get years of slavery again ;-)
As to 80m, try 3615 USB on Wednesday nights.

Gil.
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N3QQ
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« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2017, 05:58:07 AM »

Hi Gil,
Tnx!

1. Price. Other product is $950 without roofing filters (+$150) and panadapter (+$450). For buttons ShuttlePro2 is simple and inexpensive solution. 
2. If you purchased Mac Mini new, was you able to get it for half the price?
3. I agree both ends (RX and TX) must be improved.
4. Noted re connectors location.

Forward thinking means innovating: having only hard limit with Pout, everything also is open for experiments.

Sorry, can't help you with elections.

73,
Yuri N3QQ
 
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W9ZIM
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« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2017, 06:26:20 AM »

Its a stupid  design in this day and age.

[Yada yada yada]

Valid points, I suppose, but I don't get the impression that this rig is intended to be a portable radio.  If your interest is "hilltopping" or wilderness operating then there are much more suitable radios on the market -- or you can always roll your own.  The SunSDR2 seems to fill an entirely different niche.  May main "gripe" is that it seems overpriced for what it is.  If I'm supplying the front-end and brains of the rig then surely they could knock a few hundred off the price tag!
« Last Edit: April 04, 2017, 06:30:54 AM by KL0PE » Logged
W3TTT
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« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2017, 07:50:41 AM »

 Undecided
At five watts output, why the cooling fins? 

It doesn't look much more complex than a standard router/modem.  My guess is that they could sell it for $99 and still make a nice profit. 

W3TTT
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W9ZIM
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« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2017, 12:47:16 PM »

It doesn't look much more complex than a standard router/modem.  My guess is that they could sell it for $99 and still make a nice profit. 

Yes, but the make an even nicer profit at $899, at least per unit. 

Of course by bringing the price down it will attract more customers which means more profit in the end.  Remember the Nintendo 3DS?  It originally sold for $249, but sales were sluggish for the first five-months until Nintendo cut the price back to $169, and sales suddenly took off like a rocket.  Sure, they made less per unit, but they more than made up for it in volume.
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K7LZR
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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2017, 12:43:38 PM »

Looks to be a very nice SDR as they go.

I really don't understand all of the complaining about needing a computer to use with your SDR radio. While it is true that some installations may not work well, those are in the vast minority these days, especially if you are using MS Windows. Most of the better known programs such as PowerSDR & SmartSDR (Flex Radio), ExpertSDR(SunSDR), HDSDR, etc. are pretty easy to install and use. I come from the Collins KWM-2/Drake TR-3 era and I've had little trouble migrating to various SDR platforms. But I still use the oldies too Smiley.

"But the BUTTONS on my SDR aren't REAL!!" you say? Fooey. Sure they are. When you click on (or touch if so equipped) a soft button or control, it provides the same functionality that a "real" control would - i.e. the preset band buttons on your SDR do the same thing as their physical equivalents on your Kenwood, Icom, or Yaesu. Ditto the preset filter buttons. And if the computer bites it? No worries at all - get another, install software and move on. They are cheap and plentiful.

Personally, for home use I would rather have and SDR/computer combo because the hardware is often most reliable (little to go wrong) and I never have to worry about wearing out switches, pots, nor rotary encoders. I'm reasonably sure that my SDR will be still in working condition long after I am not. And I can do many things with my computer rigs that my conventional radios will never do such as infinitely variable brick-wall filters, multiple graphical tuning methods, multiple receivers, huge, beautiful spectrum & waterfall displays, remote control options, etc.

"But I need a SUPERCOMPUTER to run this stuff!" Not really. I regularly use both HDSDR & SDRUno(from the SDRPlay folks) at a full 10mhz bandwidth with smooth motion on an old Dell Optiplex 330 dual-core with 2g of RAM and it runs just fine. A decent computer which will run this stuff need not be new nor expensive.

Anyway, back to topic. That new SunSDR looks to be a nice entry in the modern radio arena Smiley.     

 
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