Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Solid state amp suggestions  (Read 657 times)
KI4HLB
Member

Posts: 23




Ignore
« on: May 29, 2007, 08:48:43 PM »

Hi all!

I have just under 3000.00 to play with and I was wondering what kind of solid state amps some of you may be using, I already have 2 L4b's and an sb-220, but I want something to cover all bands and switch bands when contesting without the muss and fuss of re tuning...

Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions.


73  DE  KI4HLB

Hari
Logged
AD5X
Member

Posts: 1426




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2007, 05:15:01 AM »

I really like my Ameritron ALS-600.  I've also been playing with the new Tokyo Hy-Power HL-1.5KFX which is also very nice.  It is a $-vs-power trade-off (about $1100/600 watts vs $2900/1000 watts).  Reviews of both of these are here on eHam.

Phil - AD5X
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20547




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2007, 12:01:08 PM »

Neither the Ameritron nor the THL has an auto tuner built in; if your antennas are all close to 50 Ohms (SWR <2.0 on all frequencies you use), the "instant bandswitching" goal can be met with these unit.

However, if your antennas depart much from a perfect match -- which is usually a pretty big problem on 80m and 160m, and maybe on other bands depending upon your antennas -- then the "instant bandswitching" feature can be entirely lost because the amplifiers won't transmit into a mismatch.

This is where solid state amps like the Yaesu VL1000 Quadra or Icom PW-1 come in.  They run a kilowatt PEP output power and also have internal auto-tuners, so if your SWR is 3:1, they'll just load into it and keep going.  

Although I have had good experience with THL products in the past, including some very nice VHF-UHF amps that were not only good but have now lasted about 20 years and are *still* good, I think their new line of HF amps is overpriced compared to the features offered: I'd expect an auto-tuner in a 1 kW SS amp that costs over $3000.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
WD8PTB
Member

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2007, 04:50:11 PM »

I would consider the Tokyo High Power. It's $3100 from HRO and includes 6m. I don't have one but I would like to.
  I have a ALS500m and a Tentec Herc II. Both work fine and are forgiving for most mistakes. 73 WD8PTB
Logged
AB3CX
Member

Posts: 622




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2007, 08:33:12 AM »

   I just bought a Yaesu FL-7000 from Bill Grassa, N4ATS. Bill is an expert on this amp. He buys them and reconditions, aligns, and custom modifies them, and then sells them for about $1300 to the general Ham audience. They put out 600-750 watts, function flawlessly, and are a bargain. Contact Bill directly via email, or check out his Website:

http://www.n4ats.com/

    I think you cannot go wrong with this one. I'm very happy with the performance. You would pay more for one on th eopen market than you would through Bill, and his are reconditioned and tested.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20547




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2007, 09:55:39 AM »

>RE: Solid state amp suggestions       Reply
by WD8PTB on May 30, 2007    Mail this to a friend!
I would consider the Tokyo High Power. It's $3100 from HRO and includes 6m. I don't have one but I would like to.<

::Interesting.  Just a question: Why would you buy the THL amp for $3K, when it runs 1 kW PEP 160-6m and does not have a tuner built in -- as opposed to a Yaesu Quadra VL-1000 which also costs $3K, also runs 1 kW PEP 160-6m and does have a tuner built in?  Unless I'm missing something, the Yaesu seems like a far better deal.  

WB2WIK/6
Logged
WD8PTB
Member

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2007, 02:28:45 PM »

The THP is very compact and includes 6m. I have not looked at the Yaesu, I have looked at the Icom PW1. It's too big for the spot I have in mind.
  73 Don WD8PTB
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20547




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2007, 03:17:58 PM »

You might want to check it out.

The Quadra is 16"w x 5-1/4"h x 17"d and is all bands including six meters, 1 kW output, with an internal auto-tuner that probably has a value of about $600 just for the tuner.  To me, that's the main benefit of using a SS amp: If I want to be cranking knobs on a tuner, I might as well just have a tube type manually tuned amplifier.  The whole value of a SS amp is "no tune," even if the antennas are less than perfect.

With the THL, I'd want to use a kW-rated auto tuner as an accessory, and the cheapest one on the market is $600 and marginally capable of handling the power.

WB2WIK/6
Logged
N6PSE
Member

Posts: 508


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2007, 10:37:54 AM »

I have been pretty happy with my Yaesu Quadra. The tuner is picky but the built in protection circuits are a life saver. I have a few local ham friends that now regret buying the 1KW Tokyo High Power. Both have found the finals too easy to blow and both owner's have their Amps in for repairs.

My next Amp is going to be the Alpha 9500.


Paul N6PSE.
Logged
K6AER
Member

Posts: 3487




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2007, 11:38:14 AM »

It need to be pointed out that if you are using a solid state amp your antenna needs to be close to 50 ohms impedance as possible. The solid state amps are designed with ratings for a 50 ohm load. G5RV and other impedance challenged antennas are OK with tuners and radios with built in tuners but should not be driven with transistor amplifiers with out a high impedance antenna coupler in between the antenna and the amp.

Also today‚Äôs modern ceramic amplifiers such as the Alpha 8100, 9500, ACOM 2000 etc. do not like loads other then 50 ohms. With as little as 150 watts reflected on a 1500 watt output the amplifiers will shut off.  It is important that with all transistor amplifiers your load be close to 50 ohms to prevent reflected high voltage from popping the output devices.
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2007, 06:53:14 PM »

You can use an antenna tuner between the antenna and the amp.  And in a lot of cases, you should.  The G5RV example is one of those cases.  

The thing to know and do is to always first tune the antenna tuner with just the rig's exciter power, turned down if possible first, to get a good match.  Once you have the match, turn the rig up to full power and check and tweak tune once again just be sure.  Turn the rig's output back down and then bring in the amplifier.  

I like to tune the amplifier into a 50 ohm dummy load, switched in via coax switch, first.  Then it theoretically will only be a very small amount of tuning, more like tweaking, to load the amp into the tuned antenna system.  

Pay careful attention to the duty cycle of your dummy load.  The second hand on the shack clock is invaluable here.  

.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!