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Author Topic: Time for Another "CW in the Movies" Thread  (Read 7793 times)
K0UA
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Posts: 1341




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« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2017, 07:56:34 AM »

One I have always wondered about is from "Hunt for Red October" what did, if anything, did Capt Mancuso send to Ramius vis the periscope flashes .. Anyone ever try to copy it?

It was in Russian Morse. Quite different from English Morse.



From what I understood, it was measurements for playmate of the month... Smiley
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KB1WSY
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« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2017, 03:30:26 PM »

Brigitte Bardot ... with a novel "fist."



73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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KM4DYX
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Posts: 62




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« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2017, 05:33:11 PM »

Brigitte Bardot ... with a novel "fist."

73 de Martin, KB1WSY

Now if that isn't enough to motivate you to practice code then I don't know what is.

73,
Al
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N3DF
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Posts: 266




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« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2017, 02:56:52 AM »

Lost Horizon, the 1937 film with Ronald Coleman and Jane Wyatt, shows two Vibroplexes in action as part of a montage depicting the search for the missing plane that eventually lands at Shangra La. 
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Neil N3DF
KQ4MM
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2017, 05:28:10 AM »

One I have always wondered about is from "Hunt for Red October" what did, if anything, did Capt Mancuso send to Ramius vis the periscope flashes .. Anyone ever try to copy it?

It was in Russian Morse. Quite different from English Morse.



From what I understood, it was measurements for playmate of the month... Smiley

Yeah, that part I remember plus we get what Ryan read to him to send, no way he sent all that plus there is  no way to really decode the clicking Mancuso did, I was mainly was wondering about the flashes from one of the periscope near the end of that scene .. You tubed it last night but couldn't make it out
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K0UA
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« Reply #20 on: September 21, 2017, 09:14:09 PM »

One I have always wondered about is from "Hunt for Red October" what did, if anything, did Capt Mancuso send to Ramius vis the periscope flashes .. Anyone ever try to copy it?

It was in Russian Morse. Quite different from English Morse.



Well, again "literary license" and all, the periscope scene was just a few seconds, but it would have taken several minutes of time to  send all that Ryan read to him at the rate he was clicking away there. And then there is the Russian/English morse thing.   What can you say, it was a movie, but a pretty enjoyable one though.

From what I understood, it was measurements for playmate of the month... Smiley

Yeah, that part I remember plus we get what Ryan read to him to send, no way he sent all that plus there is  no way to really decode the clicking Mancuso did, I was mainly was wondering about the flashes from one of the periscope near the end of that scene .. You tubed it last night but couldn't make it out
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M0LEP
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Posts: 487




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« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2017, 12:43:30 AM »

Un-picking the quotes...

Well, again "literary license" and all, the periscope scene was just a few seconds, but it would have taken several minutes of time to  send all that Ryan read to him at the rate he was clicking away there. And then there is the Russian/English morse thing.   What can you say, it was a movie, but a pretty enjoyable one though.

Yeah. Often seems the tapping, clicking or flashing is going pretty slowly so that the audience, who mostly can't read code, can recognise that there's supposed to be some meaning in it, but the message is read out rather faster so the story keeps moving. That's the movies...
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K8AXW
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« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2017, 10:04:12 PM »

Quote
It was in Russian Morse. Quite different from English Morse

Wrong!  Both are the same except for a few special characters.
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VK5EEE
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Posts: 1033




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« Reply #23 on: September 23, 2017, 07:00:41 AM »

He said quite different from English and it IS quite different from English. Not wrong.
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
VK5EEE
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Posts: 1033




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« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2017, 07:07:46 AM »

If we go by letters and sound, only A, E, K, M, O, T are the same. So I'd say that's very different.
If we go by sound only and ignore the different letters, then B, D, F, G, H, I, L, N, P, R, S, sort of U, Z are similar.
Totally different by sound and character are: C, J, Q, V, W, X, Y, AA, UT, OE, MM, UI.
I think that qualifies as being "quite different" from English Morse Smiley
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Long Live Real Human CW and wishing you many happy CW QSO - 77 - CW Forever
K8AXW
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« Reply #25 on: September 23, 2017, 09:15:08 AM »

 Roll Eyes
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KB1WSY
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Posts: 1282




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« Reply #26 on: September 23, 2017, 11:14:30 AM »

Morse was prominently featured in the movie "Lincoln." The operators listened to the clicks of the sounders (no tone). I assume that it would have been "American" Morse rather than International.

According to the ARRL:

Producer Steven Spielberg has used Amateur Radio or Morse code in three of his last four movies: Super 8 (2011), The Adventures of Tintin (2011) and Lincoln (2012). Members of the Morse Telegraph Club (MTC) -- an association of retired railroad and commercial telegraphers, historians, radio amateurs and others with an interest in the history and traditions of telegraphy and the telegraph industry -- played an integral part in the production of Lincoln.

According to International President of the Morse Telegraph Club James Wades, WB8SIW, several MTC members -- including Tom Perera, W1TP; Derek Cohn, WB0TUA; Kevin Saville, N7JKD, and Roger Reinke -- provided telegraph instruments to equip the 16 operating positions portrayed at the War Department set. Jim Wilson, K4BAV, and his son Matt had roles as extras. Wilson also worked with production staff and the actors to explain telegraph technology and the role of the telegrapher in the 1860s.


The full ARRL article is here:

http://www.arrl.org/news/morse-code-plays-role-in-new-spielberg-movie

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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N2EY
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Posts: 4436




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« Reply #27 on: September 23, 2017, 12:26:08 PM »

Morse was prominently featured in the movie "Lincoln." The operators listened to the clicks of the sounders (no tone). I assume that it would have been "American" Morse rather than International.

According to the ARRL:

Producer Steven Spielberg has used Amateur Radio or Morse code in three of his last four movies: Super 8 (2011), The Adventures of Tintin (2011) and Lincoln (2012). Members of the Morse Telegraph Club (MTC) -- an association of retired railroad and commercial telegraphers, historians, radio amateurs and others with an interest in the history and traditions of telegraphy and the telegraph industry -- played an integral part in the production of Lincoln.

According to International President of the Morse Telegraph Club James Wades, WB8SIW, several MTC members -- including Tom Perera, W1TP; Derek Cohn, WB0TUA; Kevin Saville, N7JKD, and Roger Reinke -- provided telegraph instruments to equip the 16 operating positions portrayed at the War Department set. Jim Wilson, K4BAV, and his son Matt had roles as extras. Wilson also worked with production staff and the actors to explain telegraph technology and the role of the telegrapher in the 1860s.


The full ARRL article is here:

http://www.arrl.org/news/morse-code-plays-role-in-new-spielberg-movie

73 de Martin, KB1WSY


Most excellent!

And it's not just the movies. In the musical "Titanic", there is a bit of Morse, in the song "Proposal/The Night Was Alive".

The "Proposal" part is sung by Barrett, who left his home and his girl to go to sea, because being a stoker on a ship was a better job that working in the pit (coal mine). The "Night Was Alive" part is sung by Harold Bride, the Marconi operator who sends the message free of charge for Barrett.

Some links:

Soundtrack album:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CWxDB7JxCA

Scene from a rehearsal:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzpRYtVk9Vk

I still remember the first time I heard it, and wondering if anyone else in the theatre could read the Morse.

73 de Jim, N2EY

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KB1WSY
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Posts: 1282




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« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2017, 01:07:20 PM »

Speaking of "Titanic," I always thought that SOS was "Save Our Souls" but it turns out to have been originally a German code adopted internationally in 1905. I also did not know that it is a prosign, and is thought to be distinctive in part because it has nine elements whereas supposedly no other prosign has more than eight elements. (All the above from Wikipedia.)



1913 Marconi operator room for 5 kilowatt ocean liner station (public domain photo).

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 1218




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« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2017, 11:24:09 PM »

Did anyone elsse get to show the movies while on watch?

Particularly crossing the pacific, they used to set the screen up at the after end of hatch just aft of the accommodation, and I used to able to show the film from the alleyway door outside the radio room.

Made it really great, warm night, just a gentle rock n roll swell, and a good movie, 500 on the loudspeaker.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
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